Stroud - An American Family History - As of AD 2014
SITE ADMINISTRATOR: Allen C. Stroud

If your family information listed is not up to date, please email me at astroud@domain-of-the-lord.com. I will update the online database.

George Strode: Our First Generation in America - AD 1697

(Early English pronunciation was "STRAHD" or "STROD".)

Descendants of Warinus Strode, (from Dorset, Parnham, and Shepton-Mallet, England).

This Stroud (Strode) genealogy begins at year 1066 AD in England, with our ancestor, Warinus Strode, Knighted "Warinus de la Strode" by William I, Duke of Normandy, King of England, (known as "William the Conqueror" after the Battle of Hastings).

- click here - to view Warinus Strode genealogy : (631 years, from AD 1066 to the arrival of George Stroud family in America, AD 1697).
- click here - to view George
Stroud (Strode) genealogy: (317 years, from AD 1697 to George Strode, (AD 1697), to modern day Stroud family, (AD 2014).

The 33rd generation from Warinus Strode includes the 10 children of Ivan Cecil Stroud and Mildred Wonita (Scott) Stroud: (Underscored names in GREY indicate deceased as of 2014):

Ivan Cecil Stroud, May 19, 1895- Sept. 4, 1969,Mildred Wonita (Scott) Stroud, June 6, 1910-April 10, 1971, (They had the following ten children.)

Ivan Ray, 1928-1953, Juanita June-1930, Mary Lou-1932, Bonnie Sue-1935, Susie Catherine-1937-2005,
Clara Mae-
1938, Allen Cecil-1942, Floyd Clarence-1946, Mildred Katie-1947 Johnnie Curtis-1953.

George Strode and Margaret (Smith) Strode had six children. Our American history started with two of his six children: Thomas (Stroud) Strode and John (Stroud) Strode.
Thomas (Stroud) Strode's descendents encompass a vast number of Americans, including Ivan Cecil Stroud.
John Strode's descendents include Thomas Green Clemson, founder of Clemson University. (John Strode's daughter, Elizabeth Strode, was Thomas Green Clemson's Great Grandmother).

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If you are related to Ivan C. Stroud, - click here - to instantly shortcut to his page. —But if you wish to examine all American generations leading up to Ivan C. Stroud, you may start directly below this copy with George Strode and Thomas Strode to get to Ivan Stroud through eight generations from George to Ivan. (In this database you can navigate the five generations from George Strode and John Strode to Thomas Green Clemson, Founder of Clemson University.) Or click Thomas Green Clemson, here to go directly to his family page).

The "BLUE" underscored numbers, ( ie: 123, ) located to the left of the children's names are HYPERLINKS which advance you to the next generation, and their spouses and children, if applicable. (The "BLUE" hyperlink included with the "parents" names will move you backwards to the previous generation). The absence of a hyperlink by a name does not necessarily indicate the individual's family history ends there; it could also indicate the research has not been completed for that person. The administrator of this database is part of the 33rd generation of Warinus Strode. As of August 8, 2011, and the birth of Scarlet Berlin May, (Great Grandaughter of Mary Lou Stroud), we are well into the 36th generation, and 991 years of recorded family history.

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1. 1George Strode. Born before 1660 in (England), Millbrook, Hampshire. Died about 1757 in Pennsylvania.

Married Margaret Smith. Margaret Smith b. in (England).

Issue of George Strode and Margaret Smith:

      i. son. 2George Strode b. about 1680.
      ii. dau. Ann Strode b. on 13 Oct. 1680.
2   iii. son. John Strode b. before 1682. (This family line goes to Thomas Green Clemson)
      iv. dau. Margaret Strode b. on 26 March 1682.
      v. dau. Elizabeth Strode b. about 1685.
3   vi. son. Thomas Stroud Strode b. about 1690. (This family line goes to Ivan Cecil Stroud)

Origins of the Strouds in America

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Warinus de la Strode

Warinus was born in Brittany. (Bretagne, France) He was a "Breton".

This genealogy encompasses thirty-six generations over nine-hundred-ninety four years.

It is an unbroken, contiguous family line from AD 1020, to AD 2014 .

As of the summer of 2014 CE, this genealogy extends from:

Generation 1. Warinus de la Strode - born 1020 CE; to Generation 36. Scarlet Berlin May - born Aug. 8, 2011 CE, is the most recent Great Granddaughter of Generation 33. Mary Lou Stroud - born Sept. 5, 1932 CE.

Generation 34. Russell Alan Stroud - born March 22, 1970 CE is the last paternal Stroud in this genealogy.

Generation 35. Megan Elise Stroud - born Aug. 25, 1990 CE is the last maternal Stroud in this genealogy.

Generation 36. Scarlet Berlin May - born Aug. 8, 2011 CE is the newest addition (to our family line).

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Generation 1. Warinus de la Strode (A) Born 1020. Came to England in the year 1066 A.D. in the retinue of William the Conqueror. Warinus was of the Normandy family of Geoffroi, as stated by "Hutchins", and was a son or grandson of the Duke of Bretagne, (Geoffrey I, Duke of Brittany), having borne arms (coat of arms), of ermine in a canton sable, an etoile of five points argent. This was the coat of arms issued to the English Strodes and gives further credence to the origin of the Strodes from France, (from Breton or Brittany much earlier). The "Geoffroi, Duke of Bretagne, mansion house" stood 11 miles south of Strasbourg, France. Warin is mentioned in the 1089 Domesday Book as a "ministri" (servant of the King). His land in the Domesday Book is stated as "Celewrde number 566", signifying is was an estate. Warinus wife's name is not known, but it is known that he obtained an estate upon which he built a commodious manor house (Strode Manor) and lived there until his death, rearing sons and daughters. His lineal heir was William de la Strode, (B).

Generation 2. William de la Strode, knight (B), born 1040, inherited Strode Manor from his father, (His role in the 1066 Battle of Hastings is very probable, due to his mature age of 26 years in 1066, but not certain). William and his father lived there during part of the reign of William the Conqueror, bearing the same arms as did his father, Warinus. William’s son and heir was John de Strode, knight, (C) Note that by this time the prefix of de la has now become de.

Generation 3. John de Strode, knight (C), born 1065, Strode, Dorsetshire, England, heir of William de Strode, lived at Strode Manor during the time of William Rufus (King William II), the third son of William I. In a deed, without date and written in French, John de Strode granted and released to his son and heir, Hugh de Strode, esquire (D), land in Lidlinch. Other deeds without dates were transferred to John de Strode (C). The use of French provides further credence to the Norman or French ancestry.

Generation 4. Hugh de Strode, esquire (D), born 1085, Strode & Hewstock, Dorsetshire, England, son and heir of John de Strode, knight (C), lived at Strode Manor during the time of the youngest and only English born son of William the Conqueror, King Henry I. In 1107, Hugh (D) witnessed a deed of John de Windlescore which granted to his brother, Thomas, the custody of land in Windlescore. Hugh de Strode's lineal heir was John de Strode, (E).

Generation 5. John de Strode, knight (E), born 1107, Strode & Hewstock, Dorsetshire, England, and Robert de Strode, gentlemen (F), were the sons of Hugh de Strode, esquire (D). John de Strode, knight (E), and heir of Hugh de Strode, esquire (D), by deed without date, gives to his brother, Robert de Strode, gentleman (F), and his own son, Peter, certain land in de Feescent and Middleton; remainder of it to his son, Hugh de Strode knight, brother of Peter. John de Strode (E) lived during the reigns of Henry I and Stephen.
Source 4: Page 573, "Henry I (1068-1135), reigned 1100-1135. Son of William I, Henry seized the English throne on the death of his brother William II after becoming Duke of Normandy in 1106." Page 1184, "Stephen (c1097-1154), King of England 1135-1154. A nephew of Henry I, Stephen was briefly supplanted (1141) by Matilda, Henry's daughter. Though a just and generous ruler, Stephen was not strong enough to govern the warring factions of his realm."

By two deeds without date, David de Childhaye gave to Robert de Strode, gentleman (F), son of Hugh, a manse [large stately house, or mansion] in Crockhaye. By another deed without date, William Foel of Broadwindsor gave this same Robert de Strode three acres in Over Wansley. By another deed, Alexander Barnard gave to Robert de Strode all his rights in land in Nether Wansley.

Generation 6. Hugh de Strode, knight (G), born 1130, Strode & Hewstock, Dorsetshire, England, died 1155, Strode & Hews, Dorsetshire,England, lineal heir of John de Strode, knight (E), lived during the reign of Henry I and Stephen (1100-1154). This Hugh had a son and lineal heir, Robert de Strode (H). Robert de Strode (F), son of Hugh de Strode (D), gave to his nephew, Sir Hugh de Strode (G), all his lands and rents in Broadwindsor, West Huestock, Eberworth, Nether Wansley, Over Wansley, Winzor Causey, Overstand le Down and Childhaye, County of Dorset, with house, lands of freemen, and villains, wards, reliefs, heriots, escheats, and liberties there, to him and his heirs; remainder to John, brother of Hugh (G). These lands eventually descended to Sir John de Strode, who was the John de Strode who collected and drew up the pedigree chart of the Parnham Strodes (which is being followed), along with his successors, where he lived until his death in 1636.

Returning to earlier times, another deed without date, Robert de Strode (F), canon of Sarum, gave to Hugh de Strode, Knight (G), his land in West Hewstock, Dibberwood, Over Wansley, Down and Childhaye, which was still in the family. That this Hugh de Strode lived during the reign of Henry II (1154-1181) is apparent by the character of the writing.

Generation 7. Robert de Strode, Knight (H) born 1150, Strode & Hewstock, Dorsetshire, England, was the son of the last written Hugh de Strode, knight. (G). By deed without date, Stephen de Parnham gave to Hawise, his son, land in vill of Parnham. By another deed, David de Chickley gave to Robert, son of Hugh de Strode, knight (G), and his heir, a house in Windsor. This Robert de Strode lived during the reign of Richard I (1189-1199).

Generation 8. John de Strode, knight (I), born 1175, Strode & Hewstock, Dorsetshire, England, died 1238 Strode & Hewstock, Dorsetshire, England, was the son and heir of Robert de Strode, knight (H), and lived during the reign of John and Henry III (1216-1272). From a record preserved in the Tower the following fact is substantiated: John de Strode, knight (I), was High Sheriff of Somerset and Dorset Counties during this time.

Generation 9. Nicholas de Strode, esquire (K), born 1200, Strode & Hewstock, Dorsetshire, England, died 1248, Strode & Hewstock, Dorsetshire, England, was the son and heir of John de Strode, knight (I), and grandson of Robert de Strode, knight (H). The Leiger Book of Abbotsbury, then in the hands of Sir John Strangways of Melbury, mentions that Nicholas de Strode, knight (1249), during the reign of Henry III, gave to the abbey his lands and tenements at Tolpuddle.
John de Strode, knight (L), second son of John de Strode, knight (I), and brother of Nicholas de Strode, esquire (K), lived during the reign of King Henry III.

Generation 10. Hugh de Strode, Knight (M), born 1225, Strode & Hewstock, Dorsetshire, England, died, Strode & Hewstock, Dorsetshire, England, was son and heir of Nicholas de Strode, esquire (K). He married Beatrix (Beatrice), daughter of John de Bitton, knight, by his wife Hiwisia, daughter and co-heir of Mat Furneaux, County Somerset. This Hugh was living during the reign of Edward I (1272-1307), and was given land in Childhaye for term of life, at three shilling rent. By Hughs marriage with Beatrix Bitton, their descendants were permitted to bear arms (Ermine a canton sable), and his family inherited the manor of Purefurneaux, Strengston, and the Castle of Deusborough on Quantock Hill, also manor of Sharpton.

Generation 11. Hugh de Strode, Knight (N) born 1250, Hewstock, Dorsetshire, England, died 1275, Chalmington, Catstock, Dorsetshire, England, son and heir of Hugh de Strode (M) and Beatrix Bitton Strode, married Beatrix, daughter of Fitchett, and their descendants were permitted to bear Arms (Gules, a lion rampant or, over all a bend ermine). In the sixteenth year of the reign of Edward II, this Hugh released to John Chickley and heirs land in Rigge; the same year he demised land in Bowdon in the Ford and Knighton, County Wilts. In the seventeenth year of the reign of Edward II (1307-1327), he granted of Henry Strode (O), his son, the said yearly rent for nine years of ten shillings, and after nine years, sixty shillings rent on the land he demised in Bowdon in the Ford and Knighton, County Wilts. This Hugh de Strode (N), is not styled at Chalmington in the old deeds referred to in the above notes, which are dated at Hewstock. Hewstock was his residence. The ancient places of residence of the Strode family were at Strode Manor and Hewstock, until Richard Strode (S) (listed below) during the time of Henry VI (1422-1461), moved to Parnham. Occasionally the families resided at Chalmington; and also at Chantmarle, after Sir John Strode, who had purchased Chantmarle and rebuilt the house, had succeeded to the family mansion at Parnham.

Generation 12. Henry de Strode, esquire (O), born 1275, Hewstock, Beminster, Dorsetshire, England, died 1349, Chalmington, Catstock, Dorsetshire, England, was son of Hugh de Strode, knight (N), and Beatrix Fitchet Strode, married Maud (or Matilda), daughter and heir of de Bauprea (Beaupres). By the marriage of Henry with Matilda de Bauprea, the manor of Middleway and Inclestreet came into this family. Henry demised a tenement at Stapleford for life at eight shillings rent.

In 1361, during the reign of Edward III (1327-1377), John, bishop of ... Badensis, by indenture under his seal, gives forty days pardon to all who would pray for the souls of Henry, his wife Maud (Matilda), John his son, and Joan his daughter, who had given goods for the advancement of a chapel in Chalmington in Catstock. In 1366 and 1370, Robert, Bishop of Sarum, by indenture, under the seal of Edward III, granted forty days pardon to those who should pray for the souls of said Henry, Matilda, wife of Henry, and Beatrice, mother of Henry, who had liberally given their goods to said chapel.

Generation 13. Hugh de Strode, esquire (P), born 1310, Chalmington, Catstock, Dorsetshire, England, died, Hewstock, Beminster, Dorsetshire, England; son and heir of Henry de Strode, esquire (O) and Matilda. Matilda, the mother of Hugh, and late wife of Henry de Strode, grants to Hugh and Beatrice his wife her lands in Hewstock, Nether Wansley, Chalmington, and lidlinch, during the life of Maud, at 10 s. rent and necessary diet and lodging and apparel, and diet for her son Edmund. This Hugh lived in the reigns of Edward III. and Richard II. 44 Edw. III. he granted the lands of Strode, in Lidlinch, for life, at the rent of four marks. "19 Edw. III, Hugh de Strode confirms to Edmund for life the grant of Maud his mother, of lands in Nether Wansley and Broadwindsor. Edmund gave the manor of Hemsworth to the abbey of Milton. 10 Rich. II. the abbot and convent of Milton in a deed recite, that this Edmund had by deed 2 Rich. II. granted all his land in Clifton in Broad Sidling to the abbot, with warrenty; the abbot released the warrenty to Henry de Strode. In the forty-fourth year of the reign of Edward III, Hugh de Strode (P) was granted the land of Strode in Lidlinch for life at the rent of four marks.

Edmund de Strode (Q) was the second son of Henry and Matilda. His brother Hugh de Strode, esquire (P), confirmed to him for life the grant of Maud, his mother, of lands in Nether Wansley and Broadwindsor.

Edmund (Q) gave the manor of Hemsworth to the abbey of Milton during the tenth year of the reign of Richard II. In this grant Edmund made to the abbey and convent of Milton, he said that he had by deed in the second year of the reign of Richard II, also granted all his land in Clifton and in Brod Sidling to the abbot with warranty.

Generation 14. Henry de Strode, esquire (R), born 1350, Chalmington, Catstock, Dorsetshire, England, died, Hewstock, Beminster, Dorsetshire, England; son and heir of Hugh de Strode, knight (P), and Matilda de Bauprea Strode, married Elizabeth, daughter and heir of John and Joan Brent. Their son and heir was Richard de Strode, esquire, (S) of Parnham, and was the great-great-grandson of Hugh and Beatrice Fitchett. He and his descendants bore Arms (Gules, a wyvern argent).
By deed during the reign of Richard II (1377-1399), Hugh de Strode (P), then of Hewstock, granted to Henry de Strode, esquire (R), his son and heir, his lands, etc. ... in Hewstock, Dibberworth, Causey, Hurst at le Dorn in Broadwindsor, Lidlinch, Stapleford, and Le Crenelle, County Dorset, with their rents, services, wards and marriages, reserving two chambers with the cellars under them, and with half the loft of the pigeon house there, and all his lands in County Wilts, with rents, etc. ... paying twenty marks per annum.

Generation 15. Richard de Strode, esquire (S), born 1390, West Hewstock, Beminster, Dorsetshire, England, died, Parnham, Dorsetshire, England, was the fifteenth in descent from his ancestor, William de la Strode, son of Warinus. This Richard Strode, esq. was the son and heir of Henry de Strode (P) and Elizabeth Brent Strode, and was twice married. His first wife was Elizabeth, daughter and heir of John Jerard (Gerard). His second wife was Margaret, relict of Walter Chantmarle. Margaret died without having issue by Richard. Richard and Elizabeth had sons: Edmund, son and heir, and William de Strode, esquire (T). Richard de Strode (S) and Elizabeth moved to Parnham during the reign of King Richard II (1377-1399). They had lived at West Hewstock in Berminster. Hutchins reported that Elizabeth inherited Parnham from her parents, John Jerard and Elizabeth Chaldecot (Chickly). Vestiges of Parnham remain and still show where it is reported to have stood. It was still in the family in the mid 1900s.

Generation 16. William de Strode, esquire (T), born 1420, Parnham, Dorsetshire, England, died 14 Sep 1499, Somerton, Somersetshire, England, was first son and heir of Richard de Strode, esquire of Parnham and Elizabeth Jerard Strode married Alys (Alice), daughter and heir of Roger Ledred (de Leddred), esquire.
In the 36th year of Henry VI (1422-1462) reign, by fine granted to John Nelway Etc. ... land in West Haygrove, Trent, Horsington, Higham, Netherham, Stowel, South Cadbury, Bobcary, Somerston, Ilchester, Langport, Estover, and Weston, County Somerset; the manor of North Week, land in Axminster, Okeber, Trill and Chilton, County Devon; and they rendered to William (T) and Alys and the heirs of Alys the said manors and lands; remainder to the right heirs of Robert Ledred. By this marriage of William de Strode (T) with Alys Ledred the lands mentioned came into the Strode family.

The said William de Strode (T) by a letter of attorney in the 14th year of Edward IV reign authorizes a person to deliver to William (U) his son, lands in the manors of Chalmington, Debberworth, Buckham, Bell and Blackdown, County of Dorset; and Boyden, County of Wilts. Records show a deed of feoffment made by William de Strode (T) to William de Strode (U), the son...

Generation 17. William de Strode (U) of Chalmington married Alianor, daughter of John Cheney (Cheyen) of Pinho, County Devon. The issues of William (U) and Alianor Strode were three children:
1. Richard, heir; (Richard, first born, died without a male issue, so William the second son became heir).
2. William,
3. 18. John de Strode (V). born 1450, Shepton Mallet,Somersetshire,England, died May 1510, Shepton Mallet,Somersetshire,England.

Generation 18. John de Strode (V) (the third son), (1450-1510) (below) married Joan Okele (Okle), daughter of John Okele and became the progenitor to the line of Shepton Mallet Strodes. (of which the American, Crawford Co. Indiana Stroud;s have their origin through 25. George Strode (Y). (1660-1757).

With the Strode/Ledred marriage partnership, and the resulting land inheritances of the two families, the Strode/Stroud family line would be firmly represented among landowners in Shepton Mallet history over the following centuries, leading up the 1790's when our Stroud ancestors came to America.

In John Collinson's History of West Cranmore, he states that the name of Strode in Shepton-Mallet has for at least four hundred years been a well known one. And he also says that the Strodes were persons of good social position and wealth, and that some of them, during the most eventful times, and under the most difficult and trying circumstances, strongly stood their ground and resolutely resisted their oppressor, even at the risk of their own lives and loss of personal wealth. This is an understatement as will be shown in the following ....

Generation 18. John de Strode (V), born 1450 Shepton Mallet,Somersetshire,England, died May 1510, Shepton Mallet,Somersetshire,England.the third son of William de Strode (U) and Alianor de Strode, progenitor of the Shepton-Mallet Strodes in County Somerset. He married Joan Okele by whom he had son and heir;

Generation 19. Walter Strode (W), born 1472, Shepton Mallet, Somersetshire, England, succeeded him to the Shepton-Mallet estate. Walter Strode’s son and heir was Thomas Strode (X). Note that the prefix de has been dropped from the Strode name.

Generation 20. Thomas STRODE (X) was born about 1493 at Shepton Mallet, Somerset, England, the son of generation 19. Walter Strode (W) and Joan Okele. Thomas' wife's name is not confirmed. Thomas Strode's children, born at Shepton Mallet, were: John Strode, born about 1513, inherited the estate at Shepton Mallet, had a son Stephen Strode who married Mary Hodges and had heir Thomas Strode of Wells, styled at Shepton Mallet in 1623. John died after 3 March 1555; and 21. Edward Strode, born about 1515.

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NOTE: 20. Thomas STRODE (X), son of 19. Walter Strode (W) and Joan Okele, was born in 1493. In this same year in Spain, on March 15, 1493, Christopher Columbus returned to Spain aboard the "Nina", the only returning vessel. (His flagship the Santa Maria ran aground on December 25th 1492). Columbus reported the details of his 224-day journey, and his discovery of the new land, to Spain’s King and Queen, Isabella I of Castelle, and Ferdinand II of Aragon.

Our Stroud ancestors arrived in America in 1697. This was 12 years after The failed attempt of the Duke of Monmouth to overthrow the Crown, and 7 years after George Strode purchased 500 acres of land in Chester County Pennsylvania from William Penn. It is not certain why George waited 7 years to leave England. His eldest child, George, Jr. was age 10, and his youngest son Thomas (my ancestor) was an infant at the time he purchased the land. Perhaps George waited for their benefit. British Tax records indicate he was taxed on 300 acres in Pennsylvania before 1697, so perhaps he sold (or transferred) 200 of the 500 original acres to another person before the ocean journey in 1697.

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Generation 21. Edward STRODE (Y) born 1515 at Shepton Mallet, Somerset, England, died 1570, the son of Thomas Strode and ?.
He married Alice Whiting at Somerset.
The LDS Ancestry File reports that their children were all born at Shepton Mallet. (Wallace Barr reports only Thomas, William and Edward with no dates):

William (Z) born about 1536 and died in 1592.
Agnes, born about 1538;
Thomas, born about 1540, married Eleanor Blanchard about 1565 at Batcomb, Somerset, and died at Batcomb on 7 June 1625;
Richard, born about 1542;
Anne, born about 1544, married John Ashe about 1564 at Shepton Mallet, and died after February 1592;
Jone, born about 1546;
Edward, born about 1548, married Alice Pore about 1585 at Wiltshire County, England, and died on 3 October 1608 at Shepton Mallet;
Thomas, born about 1552 and died in 1625 at Batcomb;
John, born about 1536;

Generation 22. William Strode (Z), born about 1536 (exact birth date appears questionable, but 1592 date of death is confirmed). William was the son of Edward Strode (Y) and Alice Whiting. The LDS Ancestry File reports that Edward Strode (Y) died at age 40 on 3 March 1555 at Shepton Mallet. However, Wallace Barr reports that Edward's will was proved 11 October 1593. Such long delays were not uncommon under English Law during that period, especially when real property and Manors were substantial, as it was with Edward, so a 22 year delay (1570-1593) does not conflict the LDS information. (both sources are considered credible in this sense.)

William married Elizabeth Upton at Worminster, Near Wells, Somerset. He was a clothier.
Their children, all born at Shepton Mallet, were:
Geoffrey, born about 1581, married Elizabeth Filliol about 1605 at Marnhull, Dorset, England, later married Sarah Barnard (sister of William’s wife Joan) about 1620 at Shepton Mallet, and died on 31 January 1624/5 at Shepton Mallet;
George, born about 1583, married Rebecca Crispe on 11 February 1615 at All Hallows Church, London, had nine sons and four daughters, was a wealthy clothier of Shepton Mallet and provided generously to the church there, and died in 1663, being buried on 2 June 1663 at St. James Church, Clerkenwell, Middlesex, England;
Mary, born about 1586 and died after 1640;
Thomasine, born 1587;
Generation 22. William (Z1), born 1589;

William Strode of Barrington (1589-1666) - 1635 portrait (at age 46), and James Scott, Duke of Monmouth - 1685

- click here - to view complete genealogy from Warinus Strode, (AD 1066), to modern day Stroud family, (AD 2013).
- click here - to view Stroud American Heritage and Ancestors from (AD 1697).

NOTE: STRODE CREST (COAT OF ARMS) IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER OF PORTRAIT.

Generation 23. William STRODE Member of Parliament (M.P.) (Z-1) born in 1589 at Shepton Mallet, Somerset, England, the son of William Strode and Elizabeth Upton. He was the youngest son of William Strode of Shepton Mallet and Elizabeth Upton, daughter of Geoffrey Upton of Warminster. A Somerset man, William (M.P.) (Z-1) opposed the king's commission of array in the county, and was one of the parliamentary deputy-lieutenants there in 1642. He became a colonel in the parliament's service. In 1646, at age 57, he was returned to the Long Parliament for Ilchester. A supporter of the Presbyterian faction in the House of Commons, he was expelled in Pride's Purge of 1648.
In 1661, at age 72, he was imprisoned and obliged to make submission for disobeying the orders of the king's deputy-lieutenants in Somerset. He died in 1666 at age 77.
He married Joan (or Joanne) Barnard in 1621 at Downside, Shepton Mallet.
Their children were:
William Strode, whom married Elizabeth Hivett in 1656. He died 19 February 1694/95. William followed commercial pursuits from which he acquired great wealth and reputation for integrity and honesty. In 1627 he purchased the estate of Barrington Court, in Somerset County, which had a great mansion house upon it. Then in a very short time, he became owner of many other estates -- at Martlock, Glastonbury, Street, and other places in Somersetshire;
Edward, (died at age 6) born 22 August 1623 at Shepton Mallet and buried on 2 April 1629 at the Parish Church, Shepton Mallet;
John, born about 1627 at Barrington, had two daughters, and died on 7 February 1705/6 at Odcombe, Somerset;
24. Edward Strode (Z-2), born 2 April 1629, son of 23. William STRODE M.P. (Z-1);
Elizabeth, born in 1635 at Barrington and married John Howe at Barrington on 20 April 1659;
George, baptized at Barrington on 9 October 1636 and reportedly had four sons;
Jane, born about 1640 at Barrington, married John Wyndham in 1659 at Barrington, and her will was proved on 19 August 1699 at Dunraven Castle, Glamorgan, Wales;
Johanna, born about 1642, married Henry Hickman in 1667 in England, and died in 1677;
Essex, baptized on 7 November 1646 at Barrington, married Mary Strode (daughter of Sir George, his cousin) after 1659 at London, England, and was buried at Westminster, Middlesex, England;
Barnard, baptized on 20 August 1649 at Barrington, died in 1685 (Bernard at age 36 was beheaded in the Bloody Assize for his involvement in supporting the Duke of Monmouth);
Mary, born about 1647, died the same year as her brother Bernard. Both were beheaded under the order and decree of Lord Chief Justice Jeffreys.

Generation 24. Edward Strode (Z-2), born 2 April 1629 son of 23. William Member of Parliament (M.P.) (Z-1) gave the Duke of Monmouth (James Scott) one hundred guineas and provided him shelter while he was on the run. Edward was granted a pardon, solely through his ability to pay for it. (reportedly 40 Pounds sterling). To help put this cost into perspective, William Penn would later sell plots of land in Pennsylvania at 6 pounds sterling per 500 acres. (NOTE: 40 pounds sterling would buy nearly 3300 acres in Pennsylvania in year 1700). Many of the original land sale contracts for property in Pennsylvania were finalized in England by William Penn, (or his Agent), sight unseen, having the land waiting for the buyer when they arrived in America. George Strode was one of these buyers. George Strode also inherited land in Pennsylvania from his father, Edward Strode (Z-2).

Generation 25. George Strode, (Y) son of 24. Edward Strode (Z-2), (George is our family ancestor in America) Additional information regarding this George Strode (Stroud) follows below. It seems apparent that this George Strode either choose to leave England, or possibly left under duress due to his father's, and perhaps his own, involvement with James Scott, Duke of Monmouth, in AD 1685. In 1685, Edward was age 56, and his son George was age 25. It could be assumed that George also supported the Monmouth rebellion, but no direct evidence of any indictments by the Crown is known to exist. George Strode's Grandfather was William STRODE Member of Parliament (M.P.) (Z-1). This William was expelled from England in "Pride's Purge" in 1648, and this fact undoubtedly shaped the political views of George, his son Thomas, and his Grandson, Abraham. There is much historical evidence and records in American history concerning these men, (Abraham, Thomas and George), and their families, indicating a strong desire to be free from English tyranny and rule. For them, as well as the many thousands of other American settlers of English heritage, it was extremely important, personal and imperative to be free from English rule.

End of English heritage and ancestors

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Start of American heritage and ancestors

Generation 25. George (Strode) Stroud - born 1660 in Millbrook, Hampshire, (England), died 1757 in Chester, PA; CHILDREN: George-1680; Ann-1682; John-1584; Margaret-1686; Elizabeth-1688; Thomas-1690. (Children all born in Millbrook, Hampshire, England).

Generation 26. Thomas (Strode) Stroud - (American Patriot) - born 1690 in Millbrook, Hampshire, (England), died 1773 in Chester, PA; CHILDREN: Isaac-1718; George-1720; Thomas-1722; Jacob-1723; John-1726; Abraham (Strode) Stroud-1728.

Generation 27. Abraham Stroud - (American Patriot) - born 1728 in Chester, PA, died 1812 in Chester, PA; CHILDREN: daughter Stroud-xxxx; Pvt. Jesse - America Patriot -1755; Lydia-1764; John-1765; Thomas Stroud, Sr.-1772.

Generation 28. Thomas Stroud Sr. - born 1772 in Randolph, North Carolina, died 1852 in Marengo, Crawford, IN; CHILDREN: Rial-1792; Abraham-1803; William-1804; Thomas, Jr.-1805; Delaney-1806; Charlotte-1808.

Generation 29. Abraham Stroud - born 1803-Randolph, North Carolina, died 1880 in Marengo, Crawford, IN; CHILDREN: Delana-1827; Rial-1828; Allen-1833; Lucretia-1836; Jane-1838; Simon-1839; Isaac-1843; Lucinda-1845; Joab-1850;

Generation 30. Rial Stroud - born 1828-, Crawford County, Milltown, IN; died 1902 in Marengo, Crawford, IN; CHILDREN: John R.-1851; Joab-1857; Jacob-1858; William Riley-1861; Isaac Cecil-1864;

Generation 31. William Riley Stroud - born 1861-Crawford County, Milltown, IN.; died 1939 in Temple, Crawford, IN; CHILDREN: Charles Curtis-1883; Lulu Pearl-1887; Clara Ann-1889; Minnie Dell-1861; Clarence Alva-1894; Ivan Cecil-1895; Versie Hazel-1899;

Generation 32. Ivan Cecil Stroud - born 1895-Crawford County, Temple, IN.; died in 1969 in New Albany, Floyd, IN; CHILDREN: Ivan Ray-1928; Juanita June-1930; Mary Lou-1932; Bonnie Sue-1935; Susie Catherine-1937; Clara Mae-1939; Allen Cecil-1942; Floyd Clarence-1946; Mildred Katie-1947; Johnnie Curtis-1953.

Generation 33. Allen Cecil Stroud - born 1942-Crawford County, Temple, IN. (extant) CHILDREN: Russell Alan-1970; Kristin Marie-1972, (died 2008); Jill Michelle-1974, (died 1990).

Generation 34. Russell Alan Stroud - born 1970-Lancaster, New York; (extant) CHILDREN: Megan Elise-1990.

Generation 35. Megan Elise Stroud - born 1990-Louisville, Kentucky; Daughter of generation 34. Russell Alan Stroud, Megan is currently the last "Stroud" of generation (32.) Ivan Cecil Stroud and Mildred Woneta (Scott) Stroud (Megan's Great Grandparents), to carry the Stroud name. Russell Stroud had no sons, Russell's father, Allen Stroud had no other sons, and Allen Stroud's three brothers had no sons. Of course very many other Strouds (distant cousins) will carry the name forward, but "our Stroud line" from Warinus Strode ends with Megan Elise Stroud. (A period of 994 years as of AD 2014) - (AD 1020 to AD 2014).

In this sense, "our" Stroud name will end with generation (34.) Russell Stroud, and with his daughter, generation (35.) Megan Elise Stroud .

Generation 36. Lydia Noel Maiwold - born 2004, Colin Daniel Maiwold - born 2006, Lila Sage Berger - born 2008, Michael Leonard Berger - born 2006, Scarlet Berlin May - born 2011,(These five recent additions to our family are the Great, Grandchildren of Generation 33, Mary Lou (Stroud) Henry.

END OF STRODE / STROUD HISTORY

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Our Generation 1 ancestor Warinus, was more than just an Arbalistarius "crossbowman". (Warinus' "Coat of Arms indicated that he, his father, or his Uncle was a descendant of Geoffery, Duke of Brittany.) After the Norman conquest at the Battle of Hastings in 1066, William "the Conqueror" became King William I, over all England, and Warinus Strode became Baron Sir William de la Strode, Knight. While it is quite easy to track Warinus Strode's descendants forward in history from 1066 to 1700, 1800 and beyond, the year 1066 is as far backward as I have ascertained at this time. But due to the incredible power of the internet, and social networking, it may only be a matter of time before much more missing family history prior to 1066 will be forthcoming. Cemeteries in France, Scotland or Holland, and areas in or near ancient Brittany may hold the final and only evidence; "cut in stone" TOMBSTONES. Warinus obviously had some noteriety, and important family history in France before 1066, and I have been actively trying to find it. Much history has beeen retained and well-attached to documented English political history. And just as important, retained in our English families' heritages; (but not necessarily in official records).

The names "Strode and Stroud" in England are synonymous, being indistinguishable in regards to the Warinus Strode bloodline, all leading back to one family line of Baron Sir Warinus de la Strode, Knight. In England it appears only to be a spelling preference. The same appears to be true in America, considering I have found evidence that Abraham Stroud, Patriot, (generation #29) - (born in 1803 in Randolph, N.C., died in 1880 in Marengo, Indiana, Crawford, County), used the STROUD spelling, while his father and some of his siblings continued with the STRODE spelling. Some of the spelling preferences may have simply been due to the lack of formal education after our family menbers left Pennsylvania and ventured deep into the Carolina and Indiana areas in search of fertile farmlands freely available from the government after 1776 and throughout the 1800's.

Abraham, (generation #29), born in Randolph N. Carolina, was the first generation to be buried in Crawford Country, City of Marengo, Indiana. A small number of Abraham's descendents, (having the name Stroud), continue to live in Crawford County, Indiana to this day.

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William, Duke of Normandy, whom became William I, the conqueror, descended from Viking raiders, he had been Duke of Normandy since 1035 under the title of William II. After a long struggle to establish his power, his hold on Normandy was secure by year 1060, and he launched the successful Norman conquest of England in 1066.

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After 1895, King James II, feeling that many rich delinquents had escaped for money, sent Lord Chief Justice Jeffreys into the West County. He was the most diabolic judge that ever sat on the bench. Jeffreys was a murderous circuit judge who conducted what has become known as the Bloody Assize. Upward of 300 persons were executed after short trials; many were whipped, imprisoned and fined, and nearly 1,000 were sent as slaves to American plantations. Judge Jeffreys was rewarded by King James II with the post of lord high chancellor. After King James abdicated, the chancellor was committed to the Tower, where he died in disgrace.

In Richard Symonds Diary, Symond states that "William Strode, [son of William Strode and Joan Bernard] ... lived at Barrington -- 3 myle from Ilminister -- had another house at Street, and hath all the parsonages between the towns of Street and Barrington ... his wealth was obtained by being a factor in Spain and the inheritance he received from his father, William Strode, who was a clothier in Shepton-Mallet ...

A number of our Stroud ancestors served over a 200 year period as members of Parliament from Somerset County. William Strode (W) was reelected as a member of Parliament to represent Ilchester, County Somerset in 1640. Thus he served his county in one of the most momentous times in English history. (The Civil War) The Long Parliament (1640-1653) had two William Strodes as members. This has caused much confusion, but none that cannot be resolved after a thorough study of available records.

William Strode of Barrington (1589-1666) - 1635 portrait (at age 46), and James Scott, Duke of Monmouth - 1685

- click here - to view complete genealogy from Warinus Strode, (AD 1066), to modern day Stroud family, (AD 2013).
- click here - to view Stroud American Heritage and Ancestors from (AD 1697).

The similarities of names and principals for which both stood caused this William Strode (W) of Barrington (1589) (pictured above) and "the William Strode, (1599) one of five members impeached by Charles I", to be confused by historians, who should have known better. While William Strode (W) of Barrington was in Parliament, having been returned there from the borough of Ilchester, and being a member of the Long Parliament of 1640, he could not have been one of the five members impeached for the following reasons;
William Strode (Member of Parliament), -- The Member -- died in 1645 and was buried in Henry VII Chapel in Westminster Abbey. William Strode (W) of Barrington did not die until 1666; (600 years after the Battle of Hastings)
That there were two contemporary William Strodes, who were members of the Long Parliament, is clearly proven by the Calendar of State Papers, ‘... Proclamation for the apprehension of William Strode of the County of Devon, who was accused of sedition ... was one of the representatives of the borough of Beer Alston in Devonshire;
In Collision’s Notes and Queries, Second Series, Volume XII, on page 461, ...William Strode (1599), the member ... son of Sir William Strode of Devon ... Beer Alson ... Long Parliament of 1640 ... died 1645. To compound confusion, the fathers of these two Williams were also named William;
William Strode, (Member of Parliament), (Z) for Ilchester in the Long Parliament of 1640, was son of 21. William Strode, (Z) clothier of Shepton-Mallet ... he distinguished himself by opposition to the authority of the King in Somersetshire ... The State Papers abound with notices of him during this period, and he appears to have been a source of trouble and annoyance to the King, the Bishop, and the Sheriff ... funeral for William Strode, M.P. (Z) was held in the year 1666.

There is more than sufficient evidence to distinguish between the two William Strodes. Both were heavily involved in the opposition to King Charles I as members of Parliament. This mistaken identity has caused much confusion and misinformation amongst Strode descendants in the U.S. Many American descendants have claimed descent from William of Devonshire, (the one of five members impeached). In many cases the tradition has been perpetuated without documentation. I feel confident that William Strode of Barrington, Somersetshire is the correct ancestor to the line of Strodes being traced. This William died on 20 December 1666 at Barrington and was buried at Beminster, Dorset, England.
Wallace Barr, Jr., in The Strode - Barr Descendancy includes a chapter entitled The Strodes of Shepton Mallet and Civil War (referencing The Shepton Mallet Story: A Brief Historical Sketch by Fred Davis, Alan Blandford and Lewis Beckerleg, The Shepton Mallet Society, Oakhill Press, Oakhill, Somerset, United Kingdom, 1977, Chapter VI, Civil War, pp. 45-77) which sheds much light on the turbulence of the times for the England and for the Strode family:
Charles I became king in 1625 when the country was in a troubled and disturbed state. During the first four years of his reign, he called three parliaments, with all of which he quarreled and dismissed. Thus, Charles reigned without a parliament in an arbitrary and oppressive manner for eleven years. In 1640 he was forced to call Parliament. William Strode (1589-1666, discussed above) was an elected member of this parliament from Ilchester, Somerset County. This Parliament is known as the Long Parliament because it was in session from 1640 to 1653.

The following will focus on the role of William Strode in the Civil War and his descendants role in the rebellion led by the Duke of Monmouth, in his failed quest for the English Crown. It will help to explain why some of the Strodes came to America and provides some background for the difficulties in tracing our ancestry in a precise manner in the late 1600s and early 1700s.

By 1640 confidence in the King had waned to low levels; he could not be trusted and the country was in danger of anarchy. During the debate, the King’s friends in Parliament became known as Royalists or Cavaliers. The opposition led by Oliver Cromwell received its chief support from the merchants, shop keepers, small free holders and a whole body of non-conformists and puritan members of the Church of England. The opposition were known as Roundheads or Parliamentarians. The Royalists were largely the nobles, clergy, country gentlemen, Roman Catholics, and others who disliked puritan austerity.

The demands (19 propositions) of Parliament were such that the King would become a puppet. At this point (1642) Charles I chose to draw the sword and the situation reached its climax on the battlefield in a storm of violence usually witnessed only in civil or religious strife. This was a combination of both.

The following description of events occurred in Somerset County and largely in Shepton Mallet. The Marquess of Hertford, heading up the Royalists efforts headquartered in Wells, north of Shepton Mallet, issued warrants to several hundred people requiring them to supply men and arms.

The Deputy Lieutenant of the County retaliated by issuing warrants instructing the several hundred to ignore the Marquess and to adhere to Parliament. The Deputy Lieutenant and committee announced a meeting to be held at Shepton Mallet on 1 August 1642 to take measures to preserve the peace.

The Marquess at Wells instructed Sir Ralph Hopton, M.P., Royalist Thomas Smith, and Sir Fernando Gorges with 100 mounted Cavaliers to ride to Shepton Mallet and publish the Commission of Array.

The following morning Colonel William Strode, hearing of Sir Ralph Hoptons intentions, rode from his manor house with his son and four servants, all but two of them well armed. They reached the marketplace in Shepton Mallet about the same time as Sir Ralph Hopton and his Cavaliers. Colonel Strode demanded to know the reason for the Cavaliers visit and such a show of arms. Sir Ralph bid him to alight and hear the petition read. To which Col. Strode barked: I came not to hear petitions, but to suppress insurrections, and considerably aroused, demanded they leave town. In reply, Sir Ralph laid hold of Col. Strode and arrested him on suspicion of treason.

In the struggle that ensued, Sir Fernando Gorges struck Col. Strode with a halbert (similar to a pikestaff) knocking Col. Strode from his horse. A number of Cavaliers drew their swords and held their points toward his body. Seeing this, one of Col. Strodes servants drew a pistol and held it to Sir Ralph Hopton, and would have killed him but for a quick witted Sheptonian (a Mr. White) who snatched the pistol from him.

Col. Strode thus arrested was handed over to the local constable. Sir Ralph started to read the Royalist Petition, and asked for supporters to come forward. After much mumbling and cursing from the large and rapidly growing crowd, only one man stepped forward, one Nicholas Dawton, which Col. Strode was asked to notice. To which he shouted: This is of no surprise to me. For this man is but one of the incendiaries of the town, but we are of the County and of Parliament and I demand, therefore, sir, you quit the town. On this the constable was instructed to take Colonel Strode before the Marquess of Hertford at Wells.

But shortly, a disturbance from the direction of Town Street caused a distraction. A single Cavalier came at full gallop and forced his way through the dense crowd to Sir Ralph Hoptons side and told him that many country folk were closing in on Shepton Mallet in support of Col. Strode. At this news Sir Ralph Hopton and his Cavaliers turned and rode in haste from Shepton Mallet, a much disillusioned and angry man. He and his followers, on retreat, were spreading violence and terror amongst those he met.

Following the departure of the Cavaliers, the poor constable became the center of abuse and was compelled to release Col. Strode or lose his life. Col. Strode, one of Shepton Mallets most wealthy clothiers, was loved and respected by rich and poor alike. Learning of the meeting, the tradesmen, yeomen and peasants swarmed to his support.

Before noon, without warrant or request, upwards of 2,000 people had joined Col. Strodes ranks. Scouts reported that many people coming to join Col. Strode were met by the Royalists and were beaten and wounded with ammunition and supplies taken from them.

As a result of the cowardly attacks, charges and counter charges between the Parliamentarians and the Royalists forces occurred. In another attempt to read the Commission of Array, Lord Hertford left Wells for Shepton Mallet. He was met about half way by Col. Strode and one hundred fifty horsemen. After much debate, a treacherous assault was made on Col. Strodes regiment. At least a dozen were cut to pieces and many more injured. Despite the element of surprise, the Marquess was not able to stand it and turned tail to Wells.

The Marquess of Hertford wrote a long letter to the House of Lords 25 August 1642 of which a small portion said ...that William Strode and George Malliard had made great preparation of arms and ammunition in the towns houses, and divers low persons had given out that such and such houses should be fired and the streets should run with blood.

From an original document, being a Parliamentary levey, signed by William Strode of Shepton Mallet and dated 26th August 1644. ....Whereas, this county hath extraordinarily suffered in their persons, goods, houses, lands and estates by great and bloody cruelties, oppressions, extortions, and many other wicked invertures of papist cavaliers, and other enemies ... for the prevention of further mischief, and for the preservation of the true protestant religion ... and by the authority of Parliament, require and command you to raise within your hundred fiftie able men of body and to arme them with the best armes you have or can provide and bring them to this town...

Later, at what became known as the Siege of Wells, the city found itself surrounded by Parliamentarian guns on the Bristol, Glastonbury and Shepton Mallet sides. Col. Strode had 2,000 men, ordinances, and a hundred and fifty horses. The Royalists evacuated the city. Following this the Royalists and Roundheads marched and counter marched throughout the unhappy land leaving bloodshed, violence and death in their wake. Both Royalists and Parliamentarians took their toll on Shepton Mallet, with Puritan fanaticism bringing havoc on many ecclesiastical buildings.

Following the capture and execution of Charles I in 1649, the people of Shepton Mallet returned to manufacturing and to agriculture. The town returned with vigor to both work and leisure.

Yet the day was not far distant when Shepton Mallet "Strodes" would play an even more intimate part in another drama, more bloody, more violent, than it had yet experienced -- that of the Duke of Monmouths abortive attempt for the Crown, so bringing a reign of terror upon this town more terrible than English history has hitherto known.

The Strodes were heavily involved in this rebellion. There are various accounts of how William Strode (?-1694), eldest son and heir of William Strode (1589-1666), entertained the Duke of Monmouth in 1680 at Barrington. In the year 1685, the Duke of Monmouth made an attempt to obtain the throne of England from his uncle, King James II. William Strode was in sympathy with Monmouth and sent him supplies of horses and money.

While he did this, he was not the only member (of the family) who openly aided Monmouth. Williams brother, Edward Strode of Downside, gave this Royal Rebel one hundred guineas. The gift of these guineas was not the only aid that Edward rendered. After the dreadful battle of Sedgmore, Somerset County, Monmouth fled to Shepton Mallet on the 6th day of July 1686. His trusty friend, Edward Strode, at the risk of his own life and fortune, gave the unfortunate fugitive shelter at Downside for the night. Monmouth presented Edward Strode with his brace of pistols as a token of gratitude for the loyalty shown him.

Retribution came thick and fast for the rebels. Colonel Kirke with a large band of cavalry was sent to Somersetshire to teach the rebels a lesson. Kirke and his forces extorted large sums of money from those that were able to pay. Edward Strode of Downside was among this group. His brother, William must have been able to buy his pardon. The accused who were poor were sentenced without trial and hanged.

But King James II, feeling that many rich delinquents had escaped for money, sent Lord Chief Justice Jeffreys into the West County. He was the most diabolic judge that ever sat on the bench. Jeffreys was a murderous circuit judge who conducted what has become known as the Bloody Assize. Upward of 300 persons were executed after short trials; many were whipped, imprisoned and fined, and nearly 1,000 were sent as slaves to American plantations. Judge Jeffreys was rewarded by King James II with the post of lord high chancellor. After King James abdicated, the chancellor was committed to the Tower, where he died in disgrace.

At that time in history, when George Strode came to America, (1697) the land ownership on the East Coast of America was recognized by most English settlers as being under the control of the "Crown" of England; (in regards to taxation), a situation that would not change until 1776. A vast area in Pennsylvania was given to William Penn by the King of England, to settle a debt owed by the Crown to Penn's father, who was a British Admiral. Penn, (William Penn, the son) acquired other land holdings in America as well, including areas which are now part of New Jersey. Pennsylvania records and maps, along with British tax records indicate George Strode owned several hundred acre of land previously owned by Pilliam Penn. Interestingly, Pennsylvania land records (and maps) show a 500 acre tract owned by George Strode, purchased from William Penn, while British tax records show George Strode was taxed on only 300 acres acquired from William Penn. This presents some confusion, because later records show that George sold 300 hundred acres before relocating to N. Carolina. It is this researchers's opinion that George Strode either sold, or had given away 200 acres to another party at an earlier date —perhaps before he came to Pennsylvania to live permanently. Records indicate George owned the 500 acre tract seven years before coming to America. Maps of that day show a number of adjacent 500 tracts alongside his.

Perry (Octavia J. Perry) in A Saga of Strouds and Strodes, Deford and Co., Baltimore, Maryland, 1966, p 45) says: Bernard Strode, the fifth son of William and Joan Barnard Strode, was beheaded in the Bloody Assize. There is also American tradition that Barnard was beheaded, but full substantiation is lacking. On 10th March 1686 an amnesty or proclamation of pardon was issued for all those involved in the rebellion led by Monmouth.

Edward Strode of Downside was heavily involved in the Monmouth led rebellion of 1685. But he survived the times and remained at Downside, undoubtedly because of his wealth. This is contrary to information in the book by Perry and perpetuated by other Strode descendants. She suggests that he fled to France and/or Holland with his children and sickly wife and eventually to the colonies. Elston does not make this error.

Photos taken in the Rectory of St. Peter and St. Paul Church in Shepton Mallet in 1986 provide proof to the contrary. There are numerous plaques and busts of the generosity of the Strodes. Two in particular are important in tracing Edwards (1630-1703) family. The first is a plaque in the Rectory stating Memory of Joan (Goninge) Strode, wife of edward Strode. Mrs. Joan Strode of Downside, England who had by him 10 children, 5 sons and 5 daughters of which 4 of them lyeth here underneath intered by her to wit: William, Edward, Edward, and Mary. The other six children are now living with their father to wit: Edward, John, Elizabeth, Johanna, Jane and Mercy. She (Joan) died 1st of April 1679 in the 40th year of her age.

There is another important plaque in the Shepton-Mallet parish church that says Here Relieth Edward Strode of Downside -- he departed this life the 23rd of October 1703 at the age of 73 years.

Still another plaque states Strode Bread Charity Jan. 23, 1699. Edward Strode by his will established the charity and Elizabeth, his daughter, by her will added to the fund; Rents of Farms at Winsor Hill (Downside), Sun Inn and Cottage, Townsend, Mendip and the annual dividend of L1407.16.11 at Consolidated Bank.

In Elston’s Vol. II there is a chart that supplies basic information on William (1593-1666) and on Edwards (1630-1703) children. Edward’s will abstracted by Mr. Robert Massey at the request of Elston and showed the will was dated 24 September 1697 at Shepton Mallet. Elizabeth, his unmarried daughter, was executrix. The will was proved in London 24 January 1703/04. Edward’s will mentions son John and 4 daughters and their children. More importantly it says my son, Edward, deceased. Thus Edward must have written his will sometime after Edward (born about 1665), our ancestor, died enroute to the New World with his family of small children.

In Elizabeth Strode’s will of 1715, there is mention made of her three sisters and their children, but no mention of Edward or John (her brothers). Elizabeth must have retained the rebellious ways of her father and other Strodes. Mention is made of her non-conformist ways and activities.

The well documented will of Edward Strode and his daughter Elizabeth plus the inscriptions in place as of 1986 in the Shepton Mallet church identifies Edwards family. The will of Edward dated 24 September 1697 gives us positive proof that his son Edward was deceased prior to the writing of the will. Tradition in the U.S. has been that Edward died in 1703. The documented history is much more reliable than word of mouth tradition.

The generosity of the Strode family of Shepton Mallet was initiated in the early 1600s and continued for about a century. There is a plaque at the rectory that recognizes the Strode School Charity. Founded by George Strode, clothier of Shepton Mallet in County of Somerset in 1627, May 14. The objects of the Charity are the education of Poor children of the Parish of Shepton Mallet, and the Relief of Poor Widows to be nominated Alms women of the Charity by the Trustees. Rectorial tithes of parish of Meare in County Somerset, Annual rent of Globe land at Meare and annual rent at Turbury land at Meare. George was a brother of William and an uncle of Edward of Downside.

Edward STRODE was born in 1630 at Barrington, Somerset, England, the son of William Strode and Joan Barnard BarnardM.htm.

Edward STRODE married Joan Gunning Gunning.htm in 1658 at Bristol, Gloucester, England. He died on 23 October 1703 at Shepton Mallet and was buried there in the Rectory at the Parish Church.
Their children, all born at Downside, Shepton Mallet, were:
William, born 8 July 1660 and died there, being buried on 24 March 1661/2;
Edward, born about 1661 and died before 1663;
Edward, born about 1663 and died before 1665;
Mary, born about 1664 and died before 1679;
Edward, born about 1665;
John, born about 1667, baptized 13 October 1675, married Frances Wyndham, and died after 1697;
Elizabeth, born about 1669, died in 1715, and her will was proved there on 9 August 1715;
Joanna, born about 1671 and died there on 26 November 1687;
Jane, born about 1673, married Joseph Browne there about 1693 and died after 20 March 1712 in Somerset;
Mercy, born about 1674, married Francis Wyndham about 1692 and died in 1722; and
Mary, born in 1675, baptized at Shepton Mallet on 13 October 1675 and buried there on 23 April 1676.

Edward STRODE was born about 1663 to 1668, probably at Downside, Shepton Mallet, Somerset, England, the son of Edward Strode and Joan Goninge Gunning.htm.
His wife’s name is not known.
Their children, possibly born in England, France and/or Holland, were:
George, born in 1685;
Samuel, born about 1687, married Anna ?, and died about 13 May 1765 in Loudoun County, Virginia, his will being recorded 13 November 1769;
William, born in 1688 and died in 1746;
Edward, born in 1690;
Martha, married Morgan Bryan in 1719 and died on 29 August 1762 in North Carolina; and maybe
Jeremiah.

Elston quoting Hutchins from The History and Antiquities of the County Dorset says, After the accession of Queen Mary and King William on February 13, 1689 to the English Throne, Edward Strode refused to take the oath they demanded of him, and was fined forty pounds. The following year another order was issued by the Justice of the Quarter Session. This order was that the oath be administered again, and if Edward Strode still refused, he should be committed to the gaol. (varient spelling of jail). Perry uses the same quote but note the error in date of accession to the throne in both cases. Neither checked their history books.

The preponderance of evidence is that an Edward Strode, wife and children fled England and went to France and/or Holland. We know it was not Edward Strode (1630-1703) because he died in England in 1703. It must have been Edward (born c.1665), son of Edward of Downside, that fled England.

It is very likely that Edward Strode (born c.1665) fled with his wife to France or Holland in the reign of James II (1685-1688). The Strodes were obviously strong Protestants. In addition, Edward of Downside, having various episodes with the Duke of Monmouth and possible complicity of Edward, (his son) could have been more than enough reason for him to flee with his wife, children and kinfolk.

If Edward fled England after William and Mary attained the throne (1689), as indicated by Hutchins, there may have been other circumstances that encouraged such action as a fine and threat to send Edward to jail. Obviously, the Strodes were non-conformist and rebellious.

Reports vary as to the destination of the fleeing Strodes. Some contend they went to France to join the Huguenots and, due to persecution, later fled to Holland prior to coming to the New World on the Paysay. Numerous accounts written by various U.S. descendants refer to Hollander or Huguenots (French Protestants). Tradition is not proof, but when accounts from widely differing sources make similar references, there is a strong likelihood for a basis of truth.

24. Edward Strode (X), father of: —George, Samuel, William, Edward, and probably of Martha, Jeremiah, and Barnard -- Edward died on the voyage to America in 1697, shortly before docking at port (perhaps New Jersey, Boston or Philadelphia). 24. Edward Strode was buried in New Jersey.

25. George Strode, (Y) (ancestor of Strouds in America) If the New Jersey Harbor was their port of landing, George, and his children would have then traveled to Philadelphia because George Strode (Y) had 500 acres of farmland waiting to be claimed by him. (land previous purchased from Willian Penn in 1682.)

This voyage must have been in 1697, though tradition says 1700. The 1697 date seems the most logical, given Edward Strodes (1630-1703) will dated 24 September 1697 referring to my son, Edward, deceased. In addition, Elston quotes from Administration of Estates Record Bk. A 1683-1700, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania that ‘the estate of Edward Stroud of Philadelphia, intestate, granted 12 October 1699 to George Strode, chief creditor and next of kin.

25. George Strode (Y) (born 1660) was taxed on 300 acres in Concord Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania in 1689. This tax record does not necessitate that George Strode was actually using the property in 1689; only that he owned it. Pennsylvania land records, maps and deeds confirm he purchased it directly from William Penn, (or his representative agent) and that the purchase was executed July 25, 1682 in England,

This George Strode, (Y) of the parish of Millbrook, in the county of Southampton, England, (a grocer), was a purchaser of 500 acres from William Penn, (transaction dated July 25, 1682). George came over later, (about 1697 as discussed earlier) and as old township maps show, his rectangular shaped land plot was located in Concord township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. Apparently, George divested 200 acres of the original 500 to another party before 1689, (between 1682 and 1689), which would explain a "300 acre" tax assessment record of 1689. The property tranfer of 200 acres must have occurred before George actually left England, although no physical record of that sale/transfer has been found; not in England or Pennsylvania records. Records exist of a 500 acre purchase from William Penn, while George Strode was yet in England, and records exist of taxes paid by George Strode on only 300 acres. I can only speculate on what caused this disparity. I do understand that in those days, (and for more than 200 years after that period of history), when a property dispute occurred concerning boundries, between adjacent properties, which were often only marked by rivers, ridges, cliffs and large or significant oak trees, and eventually man-made fencelines, and if a dispute raised is pracefully settled between the landowners themselves, then the taxing authority would accept the "new" bounderies and any resulting property tax assessment. Years later, beginning with "government land surveyors" such disputes are now virtually non-existant.

Public records indicate this George Strode may have been associated with a prominent Green family of Concord township, Chester, PA. The family association must have been long lasting, because 24 years later, Pennsylvania marriage records reveal Susannah Green married John Clemson on Apr. 24, 1771. And the mother of this John Clemson was Elizabeth Strode, daughter of John Strode and Magdelen James. Elizabeth married Thomas Clemson in Delaware, PA on Sept. 30, 1747.

The founder of CLEMSON UNIVERSITY-1893, was Thomas Green Clemson. His parents were Thomas Clemson and Elizabeth Baker, and his Grandparents were John Clemson and Susannah Green. His Great Grandparents were Thomas Clemson and Elizabeth (Strode) Clemson (Elizabeth Strode, born, 1712- was the younger daughter of John Strode 1682-1744, the son of George Strode 1660-1757), and brother to Thomas Strode, 1690-1787

Notes on George Strode and English history:

The Stroud Family Name is well documented in America and England; dating back 316 years to AD 1697 in America, when George Strode migrated from Shepton Mallet, Dorchester, England. (Ancient Dorsetshire, North of Lulworth Cove on the English Channel). The Strode name evolved into the current spelling of "Stroud" as the families moved south from Pennsylvania into Virginia, the Carolinas, and to Indiana in 1806. Indiana was officially admitted to the Union as a State on Dec. 11, 1816 during Madison's Presidency. Over the next 150 years, Stroud families continued westward to Illinois, Missouri, Oklahoma ...and West. Crawford County, Indiana was my place of birth. The Stroud's listed here include 36 generations of our English and American ancestors since Warinus de la Strode, Knight, in year 1066. (991 years of family history).

There are many families of English descent living in North America today who are descendants of Strouds, Strowdes or Strodes. As to the origin of the name ...in the early Tenth Century it was spelled Strodg. Most records claim that the name Stroud is of Norman origin. Some construe it to be Saxon. Whichever its origin may be, all authorities agree that in ancient records it has been spelled in different configuration -- Strode, Stroad, Strowde, Strodd, and Stroud -- all referring to the same family line, with the spelling in the U. S. generally being Strode & Stroud, with pronunciation nearly the same in England today.

Our family lineage before year 1066 will be difficult to document and confirm, and remains as speculation at this time; albeit there are strong historic indicators, and much documented English folklore, that in 1066 Warinus de la Strode came from Brittany, and was of Bretagne or Norman descent. The Native peoples are called "Bretons". (the same bloodline as Charlemaigne.) We do know that Warinus Strode came along with the retinue of King William the Conqueror. We also know for certain that our ancestors included many political activists through the chaotic period of English history from AD1100 to 1700. (especially after 1500 and King Richard) It was during this period that several individuals in our family became members of the English Parliament. Also during this period, Strodes actively supported some (but not all) attempts to overthrow the Crown. The failed attempt of the Duke of Monmouth in 1685, is one example, after his claim to the Crown was met with strong acceptance as he entered various English communities and villages, requesting support and receiving provisions and money along the way. Such action, being tantamount to treason, brought dire consequences (legal and political retribution) for supporters, including a number of Strode family members. Oftentimes innocent people were hanged or punished with huge fines for their involvement. In the instance of the Duke of Monmouth, (1685) simply living in a village where his soldiers stayed for a while would put ones life at great political risk. (see history of the Bloody Assage)

To be better informed about the family of Strouds and Strodes (most common spelling) it is well to know early English history, the history of that country when it was known as Britannia. At that time it was composed of present-day England, Wales, and Southern Scotland; the boundary line between it and Scotland being the Cheviot Hills and the Tweed River. The first recalled mention of it was by the Phoenician traders who went there often to obtain tin.

Following the Phoenicians came the Romans under Julius Caesar. The subjugation of the Britons began in 43 A.D. under Emperor Claudius, and was completed under Agricola during the years 78 to 81 A.D. From then it remained in Roman hands until 410 A.D.

When the Romans withdrew from Briton, the Picts and Scots swept down upon it from the North. The Britons then invited the Teutonic tribes (German) of Angles, Saxons, and Jutes to come help them drive out the invaders. This they did, but when they had done so, they turned upon the Britons and drove them into remote corners of Wales, Cornwall, and Cumberland before they established kingdoms of their own -- the Angles in Northumbria, East Anglis and Mercia; the Saxons in Sussex, Essex, and Wessex; and the Jutes in Kent.

From 827 A.D. to 1016 A.D. there was a long line of Anglo-Saxon sovereigns ruling England. Then came the Danish line of sovereigns, reigning until the year 1042 A.D. This was followed by the resotration of Anglo-Saxon sovereigns for twenty-four years.

In 1066 William, Duke of Normandy (Northwestern France), with about 5,000 soldiers, crossed the English channel to invade Sussex and conquer the Saxons. When the Normans won the Battle of Hastings, it meant the submission of all England to their leader, William the Conqueror. Through a preponderance of evidence found in legal documents, inheritance wills, along with marriage and church records, it has been confirmed that our "Stroud" ancestral family line in America is tracable to George Strode whom came from England to America, settling first in Chester, Pennslyvania, in year 1697. His descendants (our ancestors) relocated to North Carolina in later years. (perhaps to avoid the influence and/or oppression of Coloniel rule). Let us not forget that our Strode forefathers in America came from England. They understood English history and politics very well. It would be naive to think they didn't understand what the colonizing empire of Great Britain and the English Crown were attempting to do — it's the reason they left England.

By 1806 my direct ancestors were firmly established and raising families as farmers in Crawford County, territory of Indiana. George Strode and his ancestors have been traced back to Dorchester, England, through English church records and LDS records, (births and marriages primarily), combined with other public records such as wills, land holdings and burial (cemetery) records. These types of records abruptly end for us at year 1066, with our ancestor, Warinus Strode. The reason is clear; our ancestors were not in England before AD 1066.

King William's character was spirited, haughty, and tyrannical, but not without a generous portion of affection for his Norman followers. He disgusted his English subjects in many ways, but especially by the strong partiality which he had shown to the Normans -- preferring them in all offices of trust and dignity.

Descendants of the Normans became the ruling class of England. The Normans were a race of conquerors, with a genius for law and government, which came primarilly from their long-standing Judeo/Christian family history. It is a fact they ruled England with great ability. As it is also a fact that England became much more "Christianized" after the advent of King William I in 1066.

The English language, literature, and architecture owe much to the Normans. At first the Normans spoke French, but subsequently the Norman French blended with the Germanic tongue of the Anglo-Saxons and became English.

The Strode family of Parnham, Dorset County is an ancient knightly one, whose original progenitor in England is said to have been Warinus (Warine) de la Strode. This Warinus de la Strode came to England in 1066 in the retinue of William the Conqueror as one of his warriors and commanders. He was a skilled crossbowman, and is often given the name in Latin of "Warinus Arbalistarius" for his stature as a crossbowman. He was a participant in the Battle of Hastings on 14 October 1066 when King Harold was slain. The prefix of (de la), later added to the Strode name also lends strong credence to the French or Norman origin of the family.

The consequence of the Battle of Hastings was submission of all England to William the Conqueror, who had challenged Harold’s right to be its king. As a result of this submission, William was crowned King William I of England on 25 December 1066.

Early in his reign, King William I introduced feudal law into England, dividing the whole Kingdom, except for the royal demesne in baronies and bestowing most of them, under the tenure of military service, upon his Norman warriers. Warinus Strode, being one of those warriers, was knighted by King William I and was granted a vast estate. Afterwards, Warinus' Title was: Baron Warinus de la Strode, Knight.

From Ancient Pedigrees, Evidences, and Records, Collected and Drawn; by Sir John Strode, who died in 1636 at the age of 75 years, it is possible to learn much about these knightly STRODES. Especially can this be done when his charts are referenced in conjunction with notes of John Hutchins in his The History and Antiquities of the County of Dorset.

By recording the facts listed in Sir John Strodes chart, and the notes of Hutchins, much confusion would result if a means to differentiate people were not used. Accordingly, as had been done by both Sir John Strode and John Hutchins, capital letters (in parentheses) will be used to distinguish each succeeding generation in the early times....

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This research, which covers the period 1066 CE to today, seemed a natural extension of my previous genealogy research work covering a 6000 year period from 4052 BC to 1948 CE. This Stroud genealogy entends from 1066 CE to today; leaving 1066 years of Stroud history (between the British and Roman Empires dating to the time of Jesus Christ) yet unidentified. Perhaps some of that period can be filled in at a later date, and I have completed much research (via the unternet and telephone), but judging from evidence gathered to date, I believe an entended trip to England and France (possibly Ireland as well) would be required to accomplish anything significant concerning our heritage prior to AD 1066. Researching cemeteries first-hand would be a crucial first step; then contacting key (albeit very distant) "living" relatives to gather family histories there. France has a very long history, as does England, and I firmly believe the fragmented information is there to be found, (primarilly because of the nature and prominance of the historic characters our family was connected to), but it will take a well-planned, concerted effort, and possibly several years in France to accomplish, if at all possible.

The Stroud Family Name is well documented in America and England; dating back 316 years to AD 1697 in America, when George Strode migrated from Shepton Mallet, Dorchester, England. (Ancient Dorchestershire, North of Lulworth). The Strode name evolved into the current spelling of "Stroud" as the families moved south from Pennsylvania into Virginia, the Carolinas, and to Indiana in 1806, (20 years before Indiana was officially admitted to the Union as a State; which was enacted Dec. 11, 1816 by President Madison.) Over the next 200 years, Stroud families continued westward to Illinois, Missouri, Oklahoma ...and about everywhere by now. Crawford County, Indiana was my place of birth. Following are 34 generations of our American and English ancestors since Warinus de la Strode, Knight, in year 1066. (904 years).

James Scott and The Monmouth Rebellion, also known as The Revolt of the West or The West Country rebellion, was an attempt to overthrow James II, who had become King of England, Scotland and Ireland upon the death of his elder brother Charles II on 6 February 1685. James II was a Roman Catholic, and some Protestants under his rule opposed his kingship. James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth, an illegitimate son of Charles II, claimed to be rightful heir to the throne and attempted to displace James II.

Following the failure of the Rye House Plot to assassinate Charles II and James in 1683, plans were made for several different actions to overthrow the monarch were discussed while Monmouth was in self imposed exile in Holland. Archibald Campbell, the Earl of Argyll, landed with a small force in Scotland. Because Monmouth had previously been popular in the South West of England he planned to recruit troops locally and take control of the area before marching on London.

The Duke of Monmouth landed at Lyme Regis on 11 June 1685 and for the following few weeks his growing army of nonconformist, artisans and farm workers fought a series of skirmishes with local militias and regular soldiers commanded by Louis de Duras, 2nd Earl of Feversham and John Churchill who later became the Duke of Marlborough. Monmouths forces were unable to compete with the regular army and failed to capture the key city of Bristol. The rebellion ended with the defeat of Monmouth's forces at the Battle of Sedgemoor on 6 July 1685 by forces led by the Feversham and Churchill.

Monmouth was executed for treason on 15 July 1685. Many of his supporters were tried during the Bloody Assizes lead by Judge Jeffreys and condemned to death or transportation. James II was then able to consolidate his power and reigned until 1688 when he was overthrown in a coup d'état by William of Orange in the Glorious Revolution.

North America was used for transportation from the early 17th century to the American Revolution of 1776. In the 17th century, it was done at the expense of the convicts or the shipowners. The first Transportation Act in 1718 allowed courts to sentence convicts to seven years' transportation to America. In 1720, extension authorised payments by the state to merchants contracted to take the convicts to America. Under the Transportation Act, returning from transportation was a capital offence.

The gaols (jails) became overcrowded and dilapidated ships were pressed into service, the hulks moored in various ports as floating gaols. The number of convicts transported to North America is not verified although it has been estimated to be 50,000 by Dr John Dunmore Lang. These went originally to New England, the majority of prisoners taken in battle from Ireland and Scotland. Some were sold as slaves to the Southern states.

American Revolution: From the 1620s until the American Revolution, the British colonies in North America received transported British criminals. The American Revolutionary War brought that to an end and since the remaining British colonies in what is now Canada were close to the new United States of America, prisoners sent there might become hostile to British authorities. Thus, the British Government was forced to look elsewhere.

Transportation (or penal transportation) is the sending of convicted criminals to a penal colony. For example, France transported convicts to Devil's Island, and the UK to its colonies in the Americas (from the 1610s until the American Revolution in the 1770s); and Australia (from 1788–1868).

Origin of Penal Transportation: A convict who had served part of his time might apply for a ticket of leave permitting some prescribed freedoms. This enabled some convicts to resume a more normal life, to marry and raise a family, and a few to develop the colonies while removing them from the society. Exile was an essential component and thought a major deterrent. Transportation was also seen as a humane and productive alternative to execution, which would most likely have been the sentence for many if transportation had not been introduced.

In British colonial India, opponents of British rule were transported to the Cellular Jail in the Andaman islands.

Australia: In 1787, the "First Fleet" departed from England, to establish the first British settlement in Australia, as a penal colony. They arrived at Port Jackson (Sydney) on 26 January 1788, a date now celebrated as Australia Day. In 1803, Van Diemen's Land (Tasmania) was also settled as a penal colony, followed by the Moreton Bay Settlement (Queensland) in 1824. The other Australian colonies were "free settlements", as non-convict colonies were known. However, the Swan River Colony (Western Australia) accepted transportation from England and Ireland in 1851, to resolve a long-standing labour shortage. Until the massive influx of immigrants during the Australian gold rushes of the 1850s, the settler population had been dominated by English and Irish convicts and their descendants. However, compared to America, Australia received a significantly higher number of English prisoners.

Transportation from Britain/Ireland officially ended in 1868 although it had become uncommon several years earlier.

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The 25th Generation that came to America


Issue of 1George Strode [1] and Margaret Smith

2. 2John Strode, son of 1George Strode [1] and Margaret Smith. Born before 1682. Died in 1744 in West Marlborough, Chester, Pennsylvania, at least 62 years old.

Married Magdalen James.

Issue of John Strode and Magdalen James:

      i. dau. 3Margaret Strode . Born about 1709
4   ii. dau. Elizabeth Strode . Born about 1712

3. 2Thomas Stroud Strode, son of 1George Strode [1] and Margaret Smith. Born about 1690 in Chester, Pennsylvania. Died between 1772 and 1787 in Kennett Square, Chester, Pennsylvania.

Married Elizabeth Hollingsworth, dau. of Thomas Hollingsworth (son of Valantine Hollingsworth and Catherine Cornish) and Grace Cook, about 1717 when about 27 years old (Elizabeth was about 23 years old). Elizabeth Hollingsworth b. on 8 Nov. 1694 in (Ireland); d. in Kennett Square.

Issue of Thomas Stroud Strode and Elizabeth Hollingsworth:

5   i. son 3Issac Strode b. on 20 Sep. 1718 in Chester.
      ii. son George Strode b. on 28 Aug. 1720 in Chester.
      iii. son Thomas Strode b. on 8 Oct. 1722 in Chester.
      iv. son Jacob Strode b. on 4 Jan. 1723 in Chester.
      v. son John Strode b. on 11 May 1726 in Chester.
6   vi. son Abraham Strode American Patriot b. on 24 Nov. 1728 in Chester.

During this period the spelling of "Strode" changed to "Stroud", The reasons are uncertain, but probabably due to the pronunciation and spelling variations of "Strode", evolving from "Strowde", (losing the "long "o" sound), to "Strowd" and then to "Stroud". Such spelling changes, and pronunciations, in family names were not uncommon 300 years ago; attributable to lack of formal education and writing skills, as well as the influence of various accents and dialects of other immigrants coming from various parts of the world. The art and science of language and speech is extremely fluid and dynamic; and especially susceptable to change where formal education was chronically lacking, as it was from 1700 to 1800 in the rural areas of Southern and Central States. Farming and surviving were the main priorities in rural America and Institutions of learning came slowly for the rural masses swarming to the new land of opportunity.



Third Generation


Issue of 2John Strode [2] (1George Strode [1]) and Magdalen James

4. 3Elizabeth Strode, dau. of 2John Strode [2] and Magdalen James.

Married Thomas Clemson on 30 Sep. 1747 (Thomas was 36 or 37 years old). Thomas Clemson b. in 1710 in Delaware, Pennsylvania; d. on 30 Oct. 1785 in Lancaster, 74 or 75 years old.

Issue of Elizabeth Strode and Thomas Clemson:

7   i. son 4John Clemson b. on 12 Aug. 1748.
      ii. son James Clemson b. on 15 Jan. 1750; d. on 29 Sep. 1832, 82 years old.
      iii. dau. Sarah Clemson .
      iv. dau. Elizabeth Clemson .
      v. son Tamer Clemson .
      vi. dau. Margaret Clemson .
      vii. son Thomas Clemson .
      viii. dau. Mary Clemson .


Issue of 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3] (1George Strode [1]) and Elizabeth Hollingsworth

5. 3Issac Strode, son of 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3] and Elizabeth Hollingsworth. Born on 20 Sep. 1718 in Chester, Pennsylvania.

Married first Lydia Hayes.

Issue of Issac Strode and Lydia Hayes:

      i. dau. 4Dau Strode .
      ii. son Thomas Strode b. on 2 Nov. 1774.
      iii. dau. Mary Strode b. on 30 Sep. 1776.
      iv. dau. Elizabeth Strode b. on 16 Oct. 1778.

Married second Sarah Baker on 8 March 1741 in Wilmington, New Castle, Deleware when 22 years old.

6. 3Abraham Strode American Patriot, son of 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3] and Elizabeth Hollingsworth. Born on 24 Nov. 1728 in Chester, Pennsylvania. Died before 1812, at most 83 years old.

Married Lucretia Ogle, dau. of John Ogle III (son of John Ogle Jr. and Elizabeth Graham Harris) and Mary Elizabeth Robinson, on 2 April 1752 in New Castle, Delaware, Holy Trinity (Old Swede’s) Church when 23 years old. (Lucretia was 18 years old). Lucretia Ogle b. on 13 April 1733 in New Castle, New Castle, Delaware; d. about 1800 in North Carolina, about 67 years old.

Issue of Abraham Strode American Patriot and Lucretia Ogle:

      i. dau. 4Dau Stroud .
8   ii. son Pvt. Jesse Stroud American Patriot b. about 1755 in Randolph.
9   iii. dau. Lydia Stroud b. about 1764.
10   iv. son John Stroud b. about 1765 in Randolph.
11   v. son Thomas Stroud Sr. b. on 13 May 1772 in North Carolina.

Notes on Abraham Strode American Patriot:

Death
Note: Prob Indiana but could have been North Carolina.

Event
Type: Military Service
Date: 1771
Place: , Randolph, North Carolina
Note: Regulators Advertisement # 9
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Abraham Strode
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 14 SEP 1886 [13092]
Extracted text: Abraham Stroud of North Carolina, Randolph Co - Hillsborough District, a member of the Regulators of North Carolina, signed Regulators Advertisement # 9 in protest to the treatment the representatives of the Crown were giving the Colonists. Following an outbreak of violence at Alamance, NC on May 16, 1771, six (6) members were hanged by Governor Tyron.

Census
Date: 1790
Place: North Carolina

Will
Date: 1791
Place: , Randolph, North Carolina
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): Abraham Strode
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 14 SEP 1886 [13110]




Fourth Generation


Issue of Thomas Clemson and 3Elizabeth Strode [4] (2John Strode [2], 1George Strode [1])

7. 4John Clemson, son of Thomas Clemson and 3Elizabeth Strode [4]. Born on 12 Aug. 1748. Died on 17 May 1808 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, 59 years old.

Married Susannah Green on 24 April 1771 when 22 years old (Susannah was 19 years old). Susannah Green b. on 22 May 1751; d. on 23 May 1832, 81 years old.

Issue of John Clemson and Susannah Green:

12   i. son 5Thomas Clemson .





Issue of 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6] (2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Lucretia Ogle

8. 4Pvt. Jesse Stroud American Patriot, son of 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6] and Lucretia Ogle. Born about 1755 in Randolph, North Carolina. Died in 1812 in Harrison, Indiana, about 57 years old. Buried in Floyd, Indiana, Schrader Taylor Cemetery.

Married Jane Fields, dau. of William Fields and _____ Leniah. Jane Fields b. about 1769 in North Carolina; d. in 1859 in Floyd, about 90 years old.

Issue of Pvt. Jesse Stroud American Patriot and Jane Fields:

      i. dau. 5Catharine Stroud b. between 1790 and 1794 in North Carolina.
      ii. son Allen Stroud b. about 1794 in North Carolina; m. Arsa Askin on 10 Feb. 1825 in Orange when about 31 years old.
      iii. son Joel Stroud b. about 1795 in North Carolina.
13   iv. son Hiram Stroud b. in 1800 in North Carolina.
14   v. dau. Elizabeth Stroud b. in 1802 in North Carolina.
      vi. son Nield D. Stroud b. between 1805 and 1810 in North Carolina; m. Mary Lewis.
15   vii. son Fielding Stroud b. in 1810 in Indiana.
      viii. son Jesse Stroud b. between 1810 and 1813 in Indiana.

Notes on Pvt. Jesse Stroud American Patriot:

9. 4Lydia Stroud, dau. of 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6] and Lucretia Ogle. Born about 1764. Died in 1847 in Boone, Indiana, about 83 years old.

Married first Jacob Skeen. Jacob Skeen b. about 1767 in Augusta, Virginia; d. about 1835 in Randolph, North Carolina, about 68 years old.

Issue of Lydia Stroud and Jacob Skeen:

      i. dau. 5Betsy Skeen b. about 1782; m. John Craven.
      ii. dau. Mary C. Skeen b. about 1783; m. Benjamin Hopkins in North Carolina.
      iii. dau. Sarah Skeen b. about 1785; d. after 1850; m. Hiram Nordyke on 16 Aug. 1808 in Highland, Highland, Ohio when about 23 years old.
16   iv. dau. Lucretia Skeen b. about 1787.
17   v. son John Skeen b. about 1789.
      vi. dau. Clarissa Skeen b. about 1791; m. Samuel S. Milliken on 23 Feb. 1817 in Highland when about 26 years old.
      vii. son Abraham Skeen b. about 1793; d. after 1850 in Highland; m. Nancy Kenworthy on 18 Sep. 1817 in Highland when about 24 years old.
      viii. son Jacob Skeen b. about 1795; m. Rebecca McGREW on 23 Oct. 1823 when about 28 years old.
      ix. dau. Lydia Skeen b. about 1798; m. John Frazier on 11 June 1818 in Highland when about 20 years old.

Married second Robert Walker before 1810.

10. 4John Stroud, son of 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6] and Lucretia Ogle. Born about 1765 in Randolph, North Carolina. Died before 25 June 1847 in Harrison, Indiana.

Married Mary Julian. Mary Julian b. about 1770 in North Carolina.

Issue of John Stroud and Mary Julian:

18   i. son 5Isham (Isom) Stroud b. in 1789 in North Carolina.
      ii. dau. Catherine Stroud b. between 1790 and 1795 in North Carolina; m. (1) Moses Goldman; m. (2) Charles Savage on 10 Oct. 1810 in Harrison.
      iii. son Joseph Stroud b. between 1790 and 1795 in North Carolina.
19   iv. dau. Lucretia Stroud b. about 1795 in North Carolina.
      v. dau. Mary J. Stroud b. about 1800 in North Carolina; d. before 1847 in Indiana; m. Jesse Barnett (abt. 1800 in Kentucky–) on 16 Jan. 1821 in Orange when about 21 years old (Jesse was about 21 years old).
20   vi. son Abraham Stroud b. about 1802 in North Carolina.
      vii. dau. Mahala Stroud b. say between 1809 and 1814; m. John Mauk on 25 Jan. 1829 in Crawford.
21   viii. son Wesley Stroud b. about 1810 in Floyd.
22   ix. son Isaiah Stroud b. about 1815 in Floyd.

Notes on John Stroud:



11. 4Thomas Stroud Sr., son of 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6] and Lucretia Ogle. Born on 13 May 1772 in North Carolina. Died on 25 Jan. 1852 in Marengo, Crawford, Indiana, USA, 79 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs.

Married first Hannah Robinson on 26 Dec. 1800 in Orange when 28 years old. Hannah Robinson b. in North Carolina; d. about 1810.

Issue of Thomas Stroud Sr. and Hannah Robinson:

23   i. son 5Rial Stroud b. about 1792 in Randolph.
24   ii. son Abraham Stroud b. about 1803 in Randolph.
25   iii. son William Stroud b. about 1805 in Crawford, Indiana.
26   iv. son Thomas Stroud Jr. b. on 11 April 1805 in North Carolina Or South Carolin.
27   v. dau. Delaney Stroud b. about 1806 in North Carolina.
28   vi. dau. Charlotte Stroud b. about 1808 in Randolph.

Married second Jane Agan, dau. of Alford Agan and Ann Dimbrel, about 1806 when about 34 years old (Jane was about 34 years old). Jane Agan b. on 20 Dec. 1772 in North Carolina; d. on 25 Jan. 1852 in Marengo, 79 years old.

Issue of Thomas Stroud Sr. and Jane Agan:

29   vii. son 5Rev. Annual Stroud MG b. on 14 May 1813 in North Carolina.
30   viii. son Annanias Stroud b. on 22 May 1815 in Indiana.
31   ix. son Riley Stroud b. on 24 Dec. 1817 in Indiana.
32   x. dau. Sarah J. Stroud b. about 1819.
33   xi. son John Stroud b. on 13 Nov. 1820 in Crawford.
      xii. dau. Matilda Stroud b. in 1821 in Crawford.
      xiii. son Henry G. Stroud b. about 1826 in Crawford; m. Lucretia Bullington (abt. 1826 in Indiana–) on 14 Jan. 1875 in Orange when about 49 years old (Lucretia was about 49 years old).
34   xiv. dau. Lucinda Stroud b. on 12 Dec. 1826 in Crawford.
35   xv. son Joab Stroud b. on 9 July 1831 in Crawford.

Notes on Thomas Stroud Sr.:




Residence
Date: 1806
Place: , Clark, Indiana
Note: Harrison County was formed in 1808. Marengo later became a part of Crawford County in 1818. Thomas was in the group of first settlers to Crawford Co, Indiana in 1806
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): Early Settlements Section
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 14 SEP 1886 [12875]
Extracted text: Excerpt from the “ Illustrated Historical Atlas of Indiana” dated 1876. Early Settlements Section: Crawford Co “In March 1806, a colony of twenty-two families came to Indiana from North Carolina. Among them came Thomas Stroud, who was the first settler in Crawford Co. Thomas had sold 100 acres of land in 1806 to Samuel Ashton in Randolph Co, NC, before leaving for Indiana. He settled on Clear Creek, in the NE part of what today is Crawford Co, ( Note: This location is near the Cedar Fork of Whiskey Run Creek in what is now Whiskey Run Township.), stopping while others went on into what is today Southern Orange Co. near present day Valeen. Among those going on was a brother of Thomas and an uncle. During the summer and fall of 1806, Mr. Stroud was followed by E. E. Morgan, William McKee, and William Frakes, the latter of whom settled in the NW corner of the present Crawford Co. In 1807, a number of families were added to the settlers. Among them were Peter Frakes and William Van Winkle. The former established himself on the Big Blue River in the eastern part of the county. The Stroud neighborhood was increased in 1808 by John Peckinpaugh, Jacob Rice, Jonathon Rice, and Malachi Munk settling near the Big Spring.”

Census
Date: 1810
Place: , Harrison, Indiana
See source 3 for this person
Page(s): Thomas R. Stroud
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 14 SEP 1886 [12908]
Extracted text: 2-1-0-1-0 2-0-0-0-0

Census
Date: 1820
Place: , Crawford, Indiana
See source 4 for this person
Page(s): Thomas R. Stroud
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 14 SEP 1886 [12917]
Extracted text: p 14. 4-1-1-1-0-1 1-2-1-1-0, Liberty Township, Crawford Co., Indiana census

Event
Type: Property
Date: 06 NOV 1826
See source 5 for this person
Page(s): 1218
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 14 SEP 1886 [12927]
Extracted text: THOMAS STROUD Warrantee Name: Document #: 1218 Misc. Doc. Nr: --- Indian Allotment Nr: --- Tribe: --- US Reservations: --- Mineral Reservations: No Geographic Name: --- Metes/Bounds: No Survey Date: --- Issue Date: November 6, 1826 Cancelled: No Authority: April 24, 1820: SALE-CASH ENTRY (3 Stat. 566) Acres: 80 Land Office: JEFFERSONVILLE 1 WNW 28/ 1-S 2-E No 2nd PM IN CRAWFORD ---

Census
Date: 1830
Place: , Crawford, Indiana
Note: STROUD Thomas 12020001 00000 11000010 00000, 1 male - 5 2 males - 510 2 males - 1520 1 male - 50 60 1 female - 0 5 1 female - 510 1 female - 4050
See source 6 for this person
Page(s): Thomas R. Stroud
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 14 SEP 1886 [12959]
Extracted text: p 245. 1202000100000 1100001000000

Event
Type: Property
Date: 16 MAR 1837
See source 5 for this person
Page(s): 7158
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 14 SEP 1886 [12968]
Extracted text: THOMAS STROUD Warrantee Name: Document #: 7158 Misc. Doc. Nr: --- Indian Allotment Nr: --- Tribe: --- US Reservations: --- Mineral Reservations: No Geographic Name: --- Metes/Bounds: No Survey Date: --- Issue Date: March 16, 1837 Cancelled: No Authority: April 24, 1820: SALE-CASH ENTRY (3 Stat. 566) Acres: 40 Land Office: JEFFERSONVILLE 1 NENE 31/ 1-S 2-E No 2nd PM IN CRAWFORD/ORANGE ---

Census
Date: 1840
Place: , Crawford, Indiana
See source 7 for this person
Page(s): Thomas R. Stroud
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 14 SEP 1886 [12997]
Extracted text: p 919. 0011100001000 0002000010000

Census
Date: 1850
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty Township
See source 8 for this person
Page(s): Line 461
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Event: Marriage Date Questions
Type: Note
See source 9 for this person
Page(s): Thomas Stroud
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 14 SEP 1886 [13011]
Extracted text: There are several uncertainties re Thomas wives and children. The assumption that Hannah Robinson was his first wife is uncertain. It is also possible that Thomas had another wife that was his first. The attachment of children and mother is for now only to aid in reporting. I am in no way certain of Thomas STROUD’s children or their birth order! If this listing of Thomas’ children is correct, was one of them an infant in the care of another family and thus not in the household of the 1810 census. Oct 1994 - I am now curious as to whether Thomas may have married first in VA. Hopefully, we will be able to identify his first wife sometime in the near future. IN 1801, Thomas deeded 64 acres to Abraham in Randolph Co lying along Richland Waters at Chaney’s Corner. Could this be Hannah ROBINSON who married Thomas STROUD on 26 Dec 1800 in Orange Co., NC? Will assume this to be true until other verify or dispute.

Notes for the family of Thomas Stroud Sr. and Jane Agan:

Census: 1850Date: 1850Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty TownshipSee source 1 for this familyPage(s): page 76/38 line 467Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence. Extracted text: Thomas Stroud age 80 born North Carolina, wife Jane age 71 born in Niorth Carolina and the following all born in Crawford County: John age 26 Joel age 22 Henry age 24 Lucinda age 24

Notes for the family of Thomas Stroud Sr. and Hannah Robinson:

Marriage Note: This marriage may not be the same Thomas Stroud as there was another living in the same area, son of William Stroud and Elizabeth Eastridge. As the marriage was witnessed by Dixion Stroud, son of above, it is likely true.

Sources for Thomas Stroud Sr.:




Fifth Generation

Issue of 4John Clemson [7] (3Elizabeth Strode [4], 2John Strode [2], 1George Strode [1]) and Susannah Green

12. 5Thomas Clemson, son of 4John Clemson [7] and Susannah Green.

Married Elizabeth Baker.

Issue of Thomas Clemson and Elizabeth Baker: (Six children).

iiiiiiiiiii iiii. son. 6Thomas Green Clemson - Founder of Clemson University - 1893

iiiiiiii iiiiii. son. John Baker Clemson

iiiiiiiiiiiiiii. son. William Clemson

iiiiiiiiiiiiiv. dau. Louisa Clemson

iiiiiiii iiiiv. dau. Catherine Clemson

iiiiiiiiiiiivi. dau. Elizabeth Clemson





Issue of 4Pvt. Jesse Stroud American Patriot [8] (3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Jane Fields

13. 5Hiram Stroud, son of 4Pvt. Jesse Stroud American Patriot [8] and Jane Fields. Born in 1800 in North Carolina. Died after 1850, at least 50 years old.

Married Sarah Fox on 25 Sep. 1836 in Floyd, Indiana when 35 or 36 years old (Sarah was about 31 years old). Sarah Fox b. about 1805.

Issue of Hiram Stroud and Sarah Fox:

      i. dau. 6_____ Stroud b. before 1830.
36   ii. dau. Elizabeth Stroud b. about 1838 in Floyd.
37   iii. dau. Sylvania Stroud b. about 1843 in Floyd.
38   iv. dau. Jane Stroud b. about 1846 in Floyd.

Notes on Hiram Stroud:

14. 5Elizabeth Stroud, dau. of 4Pvt. Jesse Stroud American Patriot [8] and Jane Fields. Born in 1802 in North Carolina.

Married Wilson Taylor on 7 May 1818 in Harrison, Indiana when 15 or 16 years old (Wilson was about 24 years old). Wilson Taylor b. about 1794 in Tennessee.

Issue of Elizabeth Stroud and Wilson Taylor:

      i. son 6John Taylor b. about 1827; m. _____ _____.
      ii. son William S. Taylor b. about 1832.
      iii. dau. Mary Ann Taylor b. about 1836; m. Pickney C. Nance.
39   iv. son Nield Taylor b. about 1838.
      v. son Thomas J. Taylor b. about 1842.
      vi. son Warren Taylor b. about 1846.

Notes on Wilson Taylor: None.

Event
Type: Military Service
Place: War (1812) (With Great Britian)
Note: Indiana Militia, 1st Reg’t (Jordan’s) Indiana Militia During The Battle of Tippecanoe.
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Wilson Taylor
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 14 SEP 1886 [67503]
Extracted text: Company: 1 REG’T (JORDAN’S) INDIANA MILITIA. Initial Rank: PRIVATE, Final Rank: PRIVATE

Notes for the family of Wilson Taylor and Elizabeth Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book 2 page 9Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Sources for Wilson Taylor:

Source 1
Title: War (1812) Service Records
Extracted Text:
Regular Army Campaigns:

Canada18 June 1812-17 February 1815
Chippewa5 July 1814
Lundy’s Lane25 July 1814
Bladensburg17-29 August 1814
McHenry13 September 1814
New Orleans23 September 1814-8 January 1815


Canada, 18 June 1812 - 17 February 1815.
This campaign includes all operations in the Canadian-American border region except the battle of Chippewa and Lundy’s Lane. The invasion and conquest of Canada was a major objective of the United States in the War of 1812. Among the significant causes of the war were the continuing clash of British and American interests in the Northwest Territory and the desire of frontier expansionists to seize Canada while Great Britain was preoccupied with the Napoleonic Wars.
In the first phase of the war along the border in 1812 the United States suffered a series of reverses. Fort Michilimackinac fell (6 August), Fort Dearborn was evacuated (15 August), and Fort Detroit surrendered without a fight (16 August). American attempts to invade Canada across the Niagara (October) and toward Montreal (November) failed completely. Brig. Gen. William Henry Harrison’s move to recapture Detroit was repulsed (January 1813), but he checked British efforts to penetrate deeper into the region at the west end of Lake Erie, during the summer of 1813. Meanwhile, in April 1813, Maj. Gen. Henry Dearborn’s expedition captured Fort Toronto and partially burned York, capital of Upper Canada. On 27 May Brig. Gen. Jacob Brown repelled a British assault on Sackett’s Harbor. An American force led by Col. Winfield Scott seized Fort George and the town of Queenston across the Niagara (May-June 1813), but the British regained control of this area in December 1813. A two-pronged American drive on Montreal from Sackett’s Harbor and Plattsburg in the fall of 1813 ended in a complete fiasco. Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry defeated the British fleet on Lake Erie (10 September 1813), opening the way for Harrison’s victory at the Thames River (5 October), which reestablished American control over the Detroit Area.

Chippewa, 5 July 1814.
An American advance from Plattsburg in March 1814, led by Maj. Gen. James Wilkinson, was checked just beyond the border, but on 3 July 3,500 men under General Brown seized Fort Erie across the Niagara in a coordinated attack with Commodore Isaac Chauncey’s fleet designed to wrest control of Lake Ontario from the British. In subsequent troop maneuvers in the Niagara region, Brig. Gen. Winfield Scott’s brigade (1,300 men) of Brown’s command was unexpectedly confronted by a large British force while preparing for an Independence Day parade (5 July 1814) near the Chippewa River. Scott’s well-trained troops broke the enemy line with a skillfully executed charge, sending the survivors into a hasty retreat. British losses were 137 killed and 304 wounded; American, 48 killed and 227 wounded.
Lundy’s Lane, 25 July 1814. After Chippewa Brown’s force advanced to Queenston, but soon abandoned a proposed attack on Forts George and Niagara when Chauncey’s fleet failed to cooperate in the operation. Instead, on 24-25 July 1814, Brown moved back to the Chippewa preparatory to a cross-country march along Lundy’s Lane to the west end of Lake Ontario. Unknown to Brown, the British had concentrated about 2,200 troops in the vicinity of Lundy’s Lane and 1,500 more in Forts George and Niagara. On 25 July, Scott’s brigade, moving again towards Queenston in an effort to draw off a British detachment threatening Brown’s line of communications on the American side of the Niagara, ran into the enemy contingents at the junction of Queenston Road and Lundy’s Lane. The ensuing battle, which eventually involved all of Brown’s force (2,900 men) and some 3,000 British, was fiercely fought and neither side gained a clear cut victory. The Americans retired to the Chippewa unmolested, but the battle terminated Brown’s invasion of Canada. Casualties were heavy on both sides, the British losing 878 and the Americans 854 in killed and wounded; both Brown and Scott were wounded and the British commander was wounded and captured. British siege of Fort Erie (2 August - 21 September 1814) failed to drive the Americans from that outpost on Canadian soil, but on 5 November they withdrew voluntarily. Commodore Thomas Macdonough’s victory over the British fleet on Lake Champlain (11 September 1814) compelled Sir George Prevost, Governor General of Canada, to call off his attack on Plattsburg with 11,000 troops.

Bladensburg, 17 - 29 August 1814.
After the surrender of Napoleon the British dispatched Maj. Gen. Robert Ross from France on 27 June 1814 with 4,000 veterans to raid key points on the American coast. Ross landed at the mouth of the Patuxent River in Maryland with Washington as his objective on 19 August and marched as far as Upper Marlboro (22 August) without meeting resistance. Meanwhile, Brig. Gen. William Winder, in command of the Potomac District, had assembled a mixed force of about 5,000 men near Bladensburg, including militia, regulars, and some 400 sailors from Commodore Joshua Barney’s gunboat flotilla, which had been destroyed to avoid capture by the British fleet. In spite of a considerable advantage in numbers and position, the Americans were easily routed by Ross’ force. British losses were about 249 killed and wounded; the Americans lost about 100 killed and wounded, and 100 captured. British detachments entered the city and burned the Capitol and other public buildings (24-25 August) in what was later announced as retaliation for the American destruction at York.

Fort McHenry, 13 September 1814.
While the British marched on Washington, Baltimore had time to hastily strengthen its defenses. Maj. Gen. Samuel Smith had about 9,000 militia, including 1,000 in Fort McHenry guarding the harbor. On 12 September the British landed at North Point about 14 miles below the city, where their advance was momentarily checked by 3,200 Maryland Militiamen. Thirty-nine British (including General Ross) were killed and 251 wounded at a cost of 24 Americans killed, 139 wounded, and 50 taken prisoner. After their fleet failed to reduce Fort McHenry by bombardment and boat attack (night of 13-14 September), the British decided that a land attack on the rather formidable fortifications defending the city would be too costly and on 14 October sailed for Jamaica. Francis Scott Key, after observing the unsuccessful British bombardment of Fort McHenry, was inspired to compose the verses of “The Star Spangled Banner.”

New Orleans, 23 December 1814 - 8 January 1815.
On 20 December 1814 a force of about 10,000 British troops, assembled in Jamaica, landed unopposed at the west end of Lake Borgne, some 15 miles from New Orleans, preparatory to an attempt to seize the city and secure control of the lower Mississippi Valley. Advanced elements pushed quickly toward the river, reaching Villere’s Plantation on the left bank, 10 miles below New Orleans, on 23 December. In a swift counter-action, Maj. Gen. Andrew Jackson, American commander in the South, who had only arrived in the city on 1 December, made a night attack on the British (23-24 December) with some 2,000 men supported by fire from the gunboat Carolina. The British advance was checked, giving Jackson time to fall back to a dry canal about five miles south of New Orleans, where he built a breastworks about a mile long, with the right flank on the river and the left in a cypress swamp. A composite force of about 3,500 militia, regulars, sailors, and others manned the American main line, with another 1,000 in reserve. A smaller force of perhaps 1,000 militia under Brig. Gen. David Morgan defended the right bank of the river. Maj. Gen. Sir Edward Pakenham, brother-in-law of the Duke of Wellington, arrived on 25 December to command the British operation. He entrenched his troops and on 1 January 1815 fought an artillery duel in with the Americans outgunned the British artillerists. Finally, at dawn on 8 January, Pakenham attempted a frontal assault on Jackson’s breastworks with 5,300 men, simultaneously sending a smaller force across the river to attack Morgan’s defenses. The massed fires of Jackson’s troops, protected by earthworks reinforced with cotton bales, wrought havoc among Pakenham’s regulars as they advanced across the open ground in front of the American lines. In less than a half hour the attack was repulsed. The British lost 291 killed, including Pakenham, 1,262 wounded, and 48 prisoners; American losses on both sides of the River were only 13 killed, 39 wounded, and 19 prisoners. The surviving British troops withdrew to Lake Borgne and reembarked on 27 January for Mobile, where on 14 February they learned that the Treaty of Ghent, ending the war, had been signed on 24 December 1814



15. 5Fielding Stroud, son of 4Pvt. Jesse Stroud American Patriot [8] and Jane Fields. Born in 1810 in Indiana.

Married _____ Elizabeth.

Issue of Fielding Stroud and _____ Elizabeth:

      i. son 6Dick Stroud b. about 1847 in Indiana.


Issue of Jacob Skeen and 4Lydia Stroud [9] (3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1])

16. 5Lucretia Skeen, dau. of Jacob Skeen and 4Lydia Stroud [9]. Born about 1787. Died on 4 Sep. 1849 in Boone, Indiana, about 62 years old.

Married William Kenworthy on 17 Dec. 1807 in Highland, Highland, Ohio when about 20 years old (William was 27 years old). William Kenworthy b. on 22 Jan. 1780 in Guilford, Guilford, North Carolina, USA; d. on 31 Aug. 1854, 74 years old.

Issue of Lucretia Skeen and William Kenworthy:

40   i. son 6Abijah Kenworthy b. about 1808 in Ohio.
41   ii. dau. Sarah Kenworthy b. on 30 Dec. 1810 in Coshocton, Coshocton, Ohio.
42   iii. son David Kenworthy b. on 10 Oct. 1816 in Ohio.
43   iv. son Allen Kenworthy b. about 1818 in Ohio.
44   v. son John Kenworthy b. about 1821 in Ohio.

17. 5John Skeen, son of Jacob Skeen and 4Lydia Stroud [9]. Born about 1789.

Married Rebecca Walker on 20 April 1812 when about 23 years old.

Issue of John Skeen and Rebecca Walker:

      i. son 6Son Skeen b. about 1813.
      ii. dau. Mary Skeen b. about 1814; d. after 1880 in Marion, Linn, Iowa; m. John Burnham.
      iii. son Jacob Skeen b. about 1816.
45   iv. dau. Lydia Skeen b. on 25 April 1817 in Highland, Highland, Ohio.
      v. son Walker Skeen b. about 1825 in Highland; m. Mary Simpson on 14 Aug. 1845 in Howard, Indiana when about 20 years old.
      vi. son Son Skeen b. about 1825.
      vii. son John Lot Skeen b. in 1826; d. in 1879 in Boone, 52 or 53 years old; m. Emilene Melton.
      viii. son Abraham Skeen b. in 1831 in Boone; d. in Boone; m. Marjorie Fraizer.
46   ix. son William R. Skeen b. on 8 Feb. 1832 in Boone.
      x. dau. Rebecca Jane Skeen b. on 31 Dec. 1837 in Boone; d. on 10 Oct. 1911 in Marion, 73 years old; m. William R. Frush.


Issue of 4John Stroud [10] (3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Mary Julian

18. 5Isham (Isom) Stroud, son of 4John Stroud [10] and Mary Julian. Born in 1789 in North Carolina. Died in Orange, Indiana.

Married first Sarah McCRARY on 24 Aug. 1811 in Harrison when 21 or 22 years old. Sarah McCRARY b. in North Carolina.

Issue of Isham (Isom) Stroud and Sarah McCRARY:

47   i. son 6Julian Stroud b. in March 1813 in Orange.
48   ii. dau. Catharine Stroud b. about 1815 in Indiana.
49   iii. dau. Sarah Stroud b. about 1818 in Indiana.
50   iv. dau. Mary Stroud b. about 1818 in Indiana.
51   v. dau. Lucretia Stroud b. about 1820 in Indiana.
52   vi. dau. Lydia M. Stroud b. about 1823 in Indiana.
53   vii. son John Stroud b. about 1824 in Indiana.
54   viii. dau. Sereptia Stroud b. about 1828 in Orange.
55   ix. dau. Rebecca Stroud b. about 1833 in Orange.
56   x. dau. Susannah Stroud b. on 15 June 1835 in Salem, Washington, Indiana, USA.
57   xi. son Isom Stroud b. on 27 Jan. 1840 in Orange.

Married second Elizabeth Scott on 4 Jan. 1859 in Orange when 69 or 70 years old.

Notes on Isham (Isom) Stroud:

A story of an early Crawford Countian Lance Stroud 1editorialtablebody.lasso?-token.searchtype=authorroutine&-token.lpsearchstring=Lance%20Stroud&-nothing February 13, 2008 In 1805 Isom Stroud (1789-1860) left the familiar surrounding of Randolph County, N.C., with his father, John, and uncles, Jesse and Thomas Stroud. The Strouds started the journey with 19 other families through Tennessee and Kentucky to new Indiana territories. The Indiana Territory was looking very good by leaving behind high taxes, low prices for tobacco and Federalist extravagances in North Carolina. John and his brother, Jesse, had acquired property from the Vincennes land office in April 1807 at $2 per acre in Clark County. Thomas Stroud settled further west in the less populated lands of Knox County. By 1808, Harrison County appeared from Knox and Clark counties, and by 1818 Crawford County appeared from Orange, Harrison and Perry counties. A marriage license was issued to Isom Stroud and Sarah McCrary (also from North Carolina) on Aug. 24, 1811, in Corydon. Isom is listed an early settler in Harrison and Orange County early history records, but oddly is not mentioned in Crawford history text despite spending much of his adult life there. According to Professor J.M. Johnson in the April 5, 1906, issue of The Crawford County Democrat, Isham/Isom was buried in the old section of Marengo Cemetery and should be considered part of the War of 1812. Isom, also known as Isham Stroud, joined the fighting force known as the Yellow Jackets of Corydon on Sept. 12, 1811, less than a month after his marriage to Sarah in Corydon. Isham was part of the 120-man mounted riflemen 4th Regiment of Indiana Volunteer Militia as a fifer (musician) under Gen. William Henry Harrison. Capt. Spier Spencer (the first sheriff of Harrison County) led the Yellow Jackets Company, whose members dyed the cuffs and fringes of their buckskins or homemade wool coats bright yellow. The company from Corydon would have been a sight to see on the march with drummer and shrill fifer music playing. Isom was paid $7.33 per month, with 40 cents per day allowance for his horse. The military campaign against the Native Americans led the Yellow Jackets along with other fighting companies to the Battle of Tippecanoe on Nov. 7, 1811. I have acquired record of two accounts of heroic acts by Isham Stroud. The first book, by Samuel Duff McCoy, is entitled “Tippecanoe: Being a True Chronicle of Certain Passage Between David Larrance & Antoinette O’Bannon.” The second book, by Arville L. Funk, is entitled “A Sketchbook of Indiana History.” In both history accounts of Isham Stroud, he was found helping the wounded Spier Spencer to a log from which Capt. Spencer continued rallying his men until a shot to the head ended his life. Isham was also shot in the hip, but he continued to keep the men’s fighting spirit high with his fifer music throughout the remainder of the battle. It was reported that the shrill fifer music could be heard above the gunfire and roar of the battle. Isham was then discharged from service Nov. 23, 1811, at Shakertown, Ind. The Battle of Tippecanoe is periodically re-enacted on stage at the Outdoor Drama Theater of Lafayette, Ind. Isham is portrayed in the drama, as are others. Isham and Sarah McCrary Stroud had 13 children and several grandchildren, including some grandsons who served in the Civil War. The graves of both remain unmarked in the Old Marengo Cemetery.

19. 5Lucretia Stroud, dau. of 4John Stroud [10] and Mary Julian. Born about 1795 in North Carolina. Died on 6 April 1878 in Crawford, Indiana, about 83 years old.

Married Ebenezer E. Morgan on 27 Jan. 1814 in Harrison when about 19 years old (Ebenezer E. was about 24 years old). Ebenezer E. Morgan b. about 1790 in Delaware; d. on 13 Aug. 1850 in Crawford, about 60 years old.

Issue of Lucretia Stroud and Ebenezer E. Morgan:

      i. son 6John Morgan b. about 1819.
58   ii. son Nathan N. Morgan b. about 1820 in Crawford.
59   iii. dau. Sarepta Morgan b. on 21 Sep. 1821 in Indiana.
60   iv. dau. Catherine Morgan b. in 1823 in Indiana.
      v. dau. Martha Morgan b. in 1834.
      vi. son William H. Morgan b. about 1842 in Crawford.

Notes on Lucretia Stroud:

20. 5Abraham Stroud, son of 4John Stroud [10] and Mary Julian. Born about 1802 in North Carolina. Died before 13 Aug. 1850 in Indiana.

Married first Susannah Goldman on 18 July 1817 in Harrison when about 15 years old.

Issue of Abraham Stroud and Susannah Goldman:

61   i. dau. 6Nancy Catherine Stroud b. on 8 June 1846 in Orange.
      ii. son James L. Stroud b. about 1841; m. Celia E. Rariden on 22 Dec. 1866 in Orange when about 25 years old.

Married second Polly Jane Barnett in 1834 in Orange when about 32 years old (Polly Jane was 22 or 23 years old). Polly Jane Barnett b. in 1811 in Kentucky; d. before 1850 in Crawford, at most 38 years old.

Issue of Abraham Stroud and Polly Jane Barnett:

      iii. dau. 6Nancy A. Stroud b. in 1839 in Indiana.
      iv. son James Stroud b. in 1842 in Indiana.

Notes on Abraham Stroud:

21. 5Wesley Stroud, son of 4John Stroud [10] and Mary Julian. Born about 1810 in Floyd, Indiana.

Married first _____ Nancy. Divorced. _____ Nancy b. in Tennessee.

Married second Winna _____ on 1 April 1837 in Crawford when about 27 years old (Winna was about 25 years old). Winna _____ b. about 1812 in Tennessee.

Issue of Wesley Stroud and Winna _____:

      i. son 6Andrew J. Stroud b. about 1843 in Crawford; d. on 10 Feb. 1863 in Young’s Point, Louisiana, about 20 years old.
62   ii. son George W. Stroud b. on 30 June 1844 in Crawford.
63   iii. dau. Nancy Rebecca Stroud b. about 1846 in Orange.
64   iv. dau. Mahala M. Stroud b. about 1848 in Orange.
      v. dau. Sarah E. Stroud b. in June 1850 in Orange.
      vi. son Thomas Stroud b. about 1853.

Notes on Wesley Stroud:

22. 5Isaiah Stroud, son of 4John Stroud [10] and Mary Julian. Born about 1815 in Floyd, Indiana. Died after 1880. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Fairview Baptist Cemetery.

Married first Alia Ann Highfill, dau. of William Highfill and Elizabeth Crawford, on 3 Oct. 1839 in Crawford when about 24 years old (Alia Ann was about 16 years old). Alia Ann Highfill b. about 1823 in Crawford.

Issue of Isaiah Stroud and Alia Ann Highfill:

65   i. son 6Henry C. Stroud b. about 1844 in Crawford.
66   ii. son Francis M. Stroud b. on 9 Nov. 1845 in Crawford.
      iii. son Jesse F. Stroud b. in 1847 in Crawford.
67   iv. son Elijah J. Stroud b. about 1848 in Crawford.
68   v. dau. Mary G. Stroud b. in 1851 in Crawford.
69   vi. son Elisha Stroud b. in 1853 in Crawford, Indiana, Patoka Township.
      vii. dau. Lucinda Stroud b. about 1856 in Crawford.
70   viii. dau. Malinda Stroud b. about 1856 in Crawford.

Married second Hannah Gillett on 20 Aug. 1866 in Crawford when about 51 years old (Hannah was 39 or 40 years old). Hannah Gillett b. in 1826 in Virginia.

Notes on Isaiah Stroud:


Issue of 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11] (3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Hannah Robinson

23. 5Rial Stroud, son of 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11] and Hannah Robinson. Born about 1792 in Randolph, North Carolina.

Married Netty Morgan on 4 Sep. 1822 in Switzerland, Indiana when about 30 years old.

Issue of Rial Stroud and Netty Morgan:

      i. dau. 6Dau Stroud .
      ii. son Son Stroud b. after 1822.
71   iii. dau. Malinda Stroud b. about 1824 in Indiana.
72   iv. son James Stroud b. about 1833 in Crawford.

Notes on Rial Stroud:

24. 5Abraham Stroud, son of 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11] and Hannah Robinson. Born about 1803 in Randolph, North Carolina. Died after 1880 in Crawford, Indiana.

Married Nicey Adkins on 10 Feb. 1825 when about 22 years old (Nicey was about 19 years old). Nicey Adkins b. about 1806 in North Carolina.

Issue of Abraham Stroud and Nicey Adkins:

73   i. dau. 6Delana Stroud b. about 1827 in Crawford.
74   ii. son Rial Stroud b. on 5 March 1828 in Crawford.
75   iii. son Allen Stroud b. about 1833 in Crawford.
76   iv. dau. Lucretia Stroud b. about 1836 in Crawford.
      v. dau. Jane Stroud b. about 1838 in Crawford; m. Jacob Bloat on 21 Nov. 1853 in Crawford when about 15 years old.
77   vi. son Simon Stroud b. on 15 June 1838 in Crawford.
      vii. son Isaac Stroud b. about 1843 in Crawford; d. on 16 Aug. 1863 in Carrollton, Orleans, Louisiana, USA, about 20 years old.
      viii. dau. Lucinda Stroud b. about 1845 in Crawford; m. William H. Edwin on 2 Jan. 1865 in Crawford when about 20 years old.
      ix. son Joab Stroud b. in 1850 in Crawford; m. Sarah Bosley on 21 Nov. 1870 in Crawford when 19 or 20 years old.

Notes on Abraham Stroud:




Notes for the family of Abraham Stroud and Nicey Adkins:

Event: Pension RollType: Pension RollDate: 1874Note: Both Abraham & Nursey applied for loss of services pension for son Isaac’s service during the Civil War.See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Parents loss pension Cert# 190 225 for father & 170 559 foUnrecognized GEDCOM tag: 4 CONC r mother. [1428790]Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceMedia format: jpgMedia file: Isaac Stroud.jpgCensus: 1850Date: 1850Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run TownshipSee source 2 for this familyPage(s): page 81/41 line 499.Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceExtracted text: This is listed as the residence of John Moss age 45 born in Kentucky and wife Anna born in Crawford County with the following addiotional people living at the same location: Abraham Stroud age 47 born in North Carolina Nancy age 44 born in North Carolina Rial age 28 born in Crawford County Lucrece age 14 born in Crawford County Simon age 9 born in Crawford County Isaac age 7 born in Crawford County Lucinda age 5 born in Crawford County Joab age 4 months born in Crawford County

25. 5William Stroud, son of 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11] and Hannah Robinson. Born about 1805 in Crawford, Indiana. Died after 1850 in Indiana.

Married first Nancy Jarrold on 13 Feb. 1824 in Knox when about 19 years old (Nancy was 17 or 18 years old). Nancy Jarrold b. in 1806; d. about 1840 in Indiana, about 34 years old.

Issue of William Stroud and Nancy Jarrold:

78   i. son 6John Stroud b. about 1832 in Clay City, Clay, Indiana, USA.
79   ii. son James Watson (Wilson) Stroud b. in June 1833 in Clay City.
80   iii. son Annel Stroud b. on 18 Oct. 1835 in Clay City.
81   iv. dau. Nancy Jane Stroud b. about 1837 in Clay City.

Married second Hannah Moore on 11 Jan. 1841 in Crawford when about 36 years old (Hannah was 25 or 26 years old). Hannah Moore b. in 1815 in Crawford; d. on 19 Feb. 1873, 57 or 58 years old.

Issue of William Stroud and Hannah Moore:

      v. son 6Elisha M. Stroud b. on 16 Oct. 1841 in Crawford; d. on 7 Sep. 1863 in Valley, Chambers, Alabama, USA, 21 years old; bur. in Washington, Indiana, Old Unity Cemetery.
      vi. son Barnett M. Stroud b. on 20 Nov. 1843 in Crawford; d. on 16 Dec. 1862 in Bowling Green, Warren, Kentucky, USA, 19 years old; bur. in Washington.

Notes on William Stroud:

Birth
Note: prob Indiana

Census
Date: 1840
Place: , Crawford, Indiana
Note: census, p 893. 1200010000000 1000000000000

Census
Date: 1850
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Line 495
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Notes for the family of William Stroud and Hannah Moore:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book A page 239 record 768Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceEvent: Marriage ServiceType: Marriage ServicePlace: , Crawford, IndianaNote: Services by Rev. KeyCensus: 1850Date: 1850Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run TownshipSee source 2 for this familyPage(s): page 81/41 line 495 listAssessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceExtracted text: William Stroud age 45 born in Crawford County, wife Hanah age 26 born in Crawford County, children John age 18 born in Clay County, Wilson age 17 born in Clay County, Aniel age 15 born in Clay County, Nancy Jane age 13 born in Clay County, Elisha age 9 born in Crawford County, and Barnett age 7 born in Crawford County.

Sources for William Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1850 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1850 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of William Stroud and Hannah Moore:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1850 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1850 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Nancy Jarrold:

Need to pursue the possibility that either James or William JERRELL of 1820 Knox Co., IN, may be the father of Nancy.

Notes on Hannah Moore:

Event
Type: Pension Roll
Date: 26 AUG 1863
Note: Applied for and awarded a pension for the loss of her son Elisha during the Civil War.
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Nannah Stroud, Mother, cert# 84963
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Media format: jpg
Media file: Elisha M. Stroud.jpg
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [22695]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [22696]

See attached sources.
See source 2 for this person
Extracted text: 1860 Washington Co., IN census, Posey TWP, p 392. Buried Old Unity Cemetery. dependent mother’s pension Hannah Stroud (application 31220 certificate 84973) Hannah Stroud filed claims based upon two sons who died while serving in the Civil War. She had been married to William Stroud Jan. 13, 1841 in Crawford Co. Indiana. She said her maiden name was Hannah More (or Mose?). William deserted her and she had been dependent on her sons for her support. Barnett M. Stroud enlisted Aug. 22, 1862 in Co. C, 81 Ind. Inf. at New Albany, Floyd Co., Indiana. He died at Bowling Green Hospital Dec. 10, 1862 of an unknown disease, possibly consumption. He left no wife or child. At enlistment he had been 18 years old, eyes black, hair light, complexion light. He had been born in Crwoford Co. Indiana and his occupation was blacksmith. Elisha Stroud mustered in Aug. 29, 1862. He was killed in a skirmish with the enemy on Lookout Mt. Alabama Sept. 3, 1863. He also left no wife or children. Hannah gave her age as 47 in a July 30, 1863 statement. In Oct. 1865 she was age 49, of Washington Co. Indiana. There was a deposition from Andrew J. Moore and William L. Schwartz dated April 7, 1866. They said they had personally been acquainted with William Stroud and knew him to be an indolent, shiftless, drunken man without any property or means whatever by which Hannah could compel him to support her. Another letter said William had run off with another woman.
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [22746]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [22747]

Sources for Hannah Moore:

Source 1
Title: Pension records
ABBR: Pension records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: Craig Beeman, Notes of
ABBR: Notes of Craig Beeman
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

26. 5Thomas Stroud Jr., son of 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11] and Hannah Robinson. Born on 11 April 1805 in North Carolina Or South Carolin. Died on 1 Jan. 1876 in Effingham, Illinois, Union Township, 70 years old. Buried in Effingham, Illinois, Stroud Cemetery.

Married first Eliza Aston, dau. of Samuel Aston, on 12 May 1827 in Crawford, Indiana when 22 years old (Eliza was 20 or 21 years old). Eliza Aston b. in 1806 in North Carolina; d. on 29 Jan. 1852 in Effingham, 45 or 46 years old; bur. in Effingham.

Issue of Thomas Stroud Jr. and Eliza Aston:

82   i. son 6Joseph F. Stroud b. about 1828 in Orange.
      ii. dau. Harriet Stroud b. about 1830 in Orange.
83   iii. son Ura A. Stroud b. on 20 Feb. 1831 in Orange.
84   iv. dau. Eliza Vandalia Stroud b. about 1834 in Orange.
      v. dau. Lucretia B. Stroud b. in 1836 in Orange; m. James H. Cooper on 24 Dec. 1852 when 15 or 16 years old.
      vi. dau. Lydia Stroud b. in 1838 in Orange.
85   vii. son Ner Stroud b. on 4 July 1841 in Orange.
      viii. dau. Lydia A. Stroud b. in 1842 in Effingham, Illinois.
      ix. dau. Charlotte Stroud b. in 1844 in Effingham.
86   x. son Samuel Josephus Stroud b. on 23 Jan. 1844 in Effingham.
      xi. son Nathaniel S. Stroud b. on 5 Nov. 1845; d. on 24 Aug. 1864 in Arkansas, 18 years old.
87   xii. son Ephriam Joy Stroud b. in 1847 in Effingham, Effingham, Illinois.
      xiii. son Austin Rogers Stroud b. in April 1849 in Effingham; d. in 1928 in Effingham, 78 or 79 years old; bur. in Effingham, Illinois, Mt. Zion Cemetery.
88   xiv. son Richard Nalls Stroud b. in April 1849 in Effingham.
      xv. son Sidney Stroud m. Bethsaida Rife (abt. 1846–10 Feb. 1867 in Jasper) on 8 Jan. 1862 (Bethsaida was about 16 years old).

Married second Sarena Blunt Moody Blakely on 16 May 1859 in Effingham when 54 years old (Sarena Blunt Moody was 35 or 36 years old). Sarena Blunt Moody Blakely b. in 1823 in Tennessee; d. on 29 April 1889 in Flora, Clay, Illinois, 65 or 66 years old.

Issue of Thomas Stroud Jr. and Sarena Blunt Moody Blakely:

89   xvi. dau. 6Irena Helena Stroud b. about 1860.
      xvii. dau. Angelina Bernicia Stroud b. about 1862 in Effingham.

Notes on Thomas Stroud Jr.:

GEDCOM The place name “North Carolina Or South Carolina” must not exceed 31 characters: 0 @I722@ INDI ◊ 1 BIRT ◊ 2 PLAC North Carolina Or South Carolina [24600]

See attached sources.
See source 1 for this person
Extracted text: Thomas came with his parents to Indiana as a boy where he married Eliza Aston. He lived in Orange Co, IN until 1840 when he moved to various points in KY, Ark, & Mo until settling in Lucas TWP, Effingham Co, IL in 1841 living there until 1860 when he moved to Union TWP, Effingham Co where he died in 1874. Obit lists 15 children. 1830 Orange Co., IN census, p 41. 1840 Orange Co., IN census, p 77. 1870 Effingham Co., IL census, Union TWP, p 1. Resided Effingham Co., IL, 1841 thru his death in 1874. Buried Stroud Cemetery. Dependent father pension application for Thomas Stroud 192,185: On Dec. 6, 1870, Samuel J. Stroud of Effingham Co. IL deposed that Thomas Stroud had been afflicted for 15 years and unable to work and Nathaniel had supported him.(Nathaniel Stroud was in Co. D 54 IL Inf and was killed in action at Jones Station Ark. Aug. 24, 1864) Eliza, the wife of Thomas Stroud died Jan. 29, 1852 and Nathaniel S. Stroud was born Nov. 5, 1845. In a declaration dated Aug. 20, Thomas Stroud was of Elliott Town, Effingham Co. IL, age 63. On March 6, 1871 Thomas Stroud deposed that he had lived at Elliottown the last 16 years. He had owned land, but about 11 years ago, because of feeble health, had traded it for personal property and provisions. Since the soldiers death, he had been supported by his son, Joseph Stroud, who deceased 20 July 1869 and by his son Samuel J. Stroud. Other children mentioned: Ere A. Stroud of Elliottown IL Eliza V. Tilton of Iowa City IA Lucretia Cooper of Iowa City IA Sidney Stroud of Neuton IL Ner Stroud of Elliottown IL Samuel J. Stroud of Elliottown IL Austin R. Stroud of Casey IL Richard V. Stroud of Casey IL Since the death of Joseph Stroud, Samuel J. and Ner Stroud furnished him with provisions and wearing apparel. Before the war, Nathaniel S. Stroud had worked for Henry Lake, Zacharias Allen and Joseph J. Stroud.
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [24665]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [24666]

Notes for the family of Thomas Stroud Jr. and Eliza Aston:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book A page77 record #268Assessment: 4MarriageNote: Name show on license was “Eliza Seton”

Sources for Thomas Stroud Jr.:

Source 1
Title: Craig Beeman, Notes of
ABBR: Notes of Craig Beeman
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Thomas Stroud Jr. and Eliza Aston:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Sarena Blunt Moody Blakely:

Census
Date: 1880
Place: Mason, Effingham, Illinois
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0205, Page Number 452C
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Irena STROUD Self W Female W 58 TN Keeping House AL AL Hellena STROUD Dau S Female W 19 IL Keeping House IN TN Angeline STROUD Dau S Female W 17 IL Keeping House IN TN Malen MOODY Son S Male W 29 IL Farmer IL TN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [54860]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [54861]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [54862]

Sources for Sarena Blunt Moody Blakely:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

27. 5Delaney Stroud, dau. of 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11] and Hannah Robinson. Born about 1806 in North Carolina. Died about 1839 in Indiana, about 33 years old.

Married James Luther, son of Peter Luther (son of Christian Luther and Allie Sewell) and Sarah Randall, on 13 June 1825 in Crawford when about 19 years old (James was 18 or 19 years old). James Luther b. in 1806 in North Carolina; d. in 1856 in Clay, 49 or 50 years old; m. (2) Hannah Gooden (1813 in Kentucky–) on 3 Jan. 1841 in Owen when 34 or 35 years old (Hannah was 27 or 28 years old); issue (surname Luther): Nancy (3 Sep. 1843 in Clay–5 July 1874), George W (1846 in Clay–), Sarah J. (1846 in Clay–) and Mary Ann (1849 in Clay–).

Issue of Delaney Stroud and James Luther:

90   i. dau. 6Mahala Luther b. about 1830 in Clay.
91   ii. son William Riley Luther b. on 30 April 1832 in Clay.
      iii. dau. Charlotte Luther b. in 1834.
92   iv. dau. Ally Louiza Maria Luther b. in 1837 in Clay.

Notes on Delaney Stroud:

Delany may have died prior to 1850 due to her husband, James LUTHER, appearing in the 1850 Clay Co., IN census, with wife Hannah, b. KY.

Notes on James Luther:

GEDCOM Extraneous, unrecognized or ambiguous characters “by August” in date: 0 @I58113@ INDI ◊ 1 DEAT ◊ 2 DATE by August 1856 [891097]

Death
Note: The administrator of his estate was Henry Moss. At this term of court in 1856, the administrator petitioned to sell the land of James Luther, deceased, to John Dalgarn. The deal also included some personal property, not specified. A guardian had been appointed for the minor heirs. (Can’t read name.) The land being sold was:
SE 1/4 SW 1/4 Sec 7 Twn 10 Range 6, 36 88/100 acres.
NW 1/4 SW 1/4 Sec 7 Twp 10 Range 6, 6.37 acres.
SW 1/4 SW 1/4 Sec 7 Twp 11 Range 6, 37 acres.
SW 1/4 SW 1/4 Sec 4 Twp 11, Range 6, 40 acres.
(Note that this record is very hard to read.)
It appears that Dalgarn was to make three payments of $595 each.

The heirs of James Luther were given as: Alley Louisa Maria age 19, Nancy Ann
age 13, George Washington age 10, Sarah Jane age 10, and Mahala White wife of Richard White, William R. Luther and Charlotte S. Luther, the latter 3 are adults.

Residence
Date: 01 JUN 1831
Place: , Clay, Indiana
Note: , when he patented land, This was for W 1/2 NW 1/4 Sec 10 T 10 N, R 6 W. James and Delaney sold this land 14 Jan 1837 for $100, to John Hulett, 40 acres. Witnesses were David and Mary White. They also had patent for N E 1/4 SE 1/4 Sec 6 T 10 N R 6 W (15 Oct 1835). On 30 Mar 1837 James patented SE 1/4 NW 1/4 Sec 10 T 10 N R 6W.

Census
Date: 1830
Place: , Clay, Indiana
Note: Both husband and wife are age 20-30. There are two girls under 5 in the household.

Census
Date: 1840
Place: , Clay, Indiana
See source 1 for this person
Extracted text: They are on page 351. The listing is: 111001-112001. Husband and wife are age 30-40. There are two girls and a boy age 10-15 (born 1825-1830), one boy and one girl age 5-10 (born 1830-1835), and one boy and one girl under 5. Note that we do not have the names of the two girls who were born before 1830.
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [891130]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [891131]

Census
Date: 1850
Place: , Clay, Indiana
See source 2 for this person
Extracted text: He was living in Harrison Township, p. 287. He was age 44, born North Carolina, and had real-estate worth $450. His wife, Hannah, was age 37, and children in the household were William R 18, Charlotte 16, Louisa 13, Nancy 7, George 4, Sarah J. 4,and Mary Ann 1.
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [891143]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [891144]

Residence
Date: 10 APR 1847
Place: , Clay, Indiana
Note: I think he must be the James Luther who bought land from Joseph Luther, the North East 1/4 SW 1/4, Section 25, Township 11 North, Range 6 West.

Notes for the family of James Luther and Delaney Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book A Page 60-199Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceSee source 1 for this familyEvent: Marriage ServiceType: Marriage ServicePlace: , Crawford, IndianaNote: William B. Johnson Justice of the Peace

Notes for the family of James Luther and Hannah Gooden:

See source 1 for this familySee source 2 for this family

Sources for James Luther:

Source 1
Title: 1840 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1840 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1850 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1850 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of James Luther and Delaney Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of James Luther and Hannah Gooden:

Source 1
Author: Janice Hagan
Title: Hand written Family Listings and “Luther News” published 1986-1989
Publication: Athens, Georgia, about 1980.
ABBR: Correspondence--Janice Hagan
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

28. 5Charlotte Stroud, dau. of 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11] and Hannah Robinson. Born about 1808 in Randolph, North Carolina.

Married William Luther, son of William Luther (son of Christian Luther and Allie Sewell), on 23 March 1827 in Crawford, Indiana when about 19 years old (William was 22 years old). William Luther b. on 27 Oct. 1804 in North Carolina; d. on 18 Dec. 1864 in Clay, 60 years old.

Issue of Charlotte Stroud and William Luther:

      i. son 6Jable Luther b. about 1828 in Indiana; d. on 18 Dec. 1864 in Clay, about 36 years old; m. Henrietta Billings on 21 Feb. 1856 when about 28 years old.
      ii. dau. Luinda Luther b. in 1832 in Clay; d. before 1909, at most 76 years old.
93   iii. son James Luther b. about 1828 in Indiana.
94   iv. dau. Malinda J. Luther b. on 17 Dec. 1832 in Clay.
95   v. dau. Sarah A. Luther b. about 1838.
      vi. son James R. Luther b. about 1840; d. on 12 Dec. 1864 in Clay, about 24 years old.
96   vii. son Peter Thomas Luther b. on 18 Oct. 1844 in Clay.
      viii. dau. Permelia A. Luther b. about 1850 in Clay City, Clay, Indiana, USA.
      ix. child _____ Luther .
      x. child _____ Luther .
      xi. child _____ Luther .

Notes on William Luther:

Census
Date: 1850
Note: Clay Co., Indiana census

Notes for the family of William Luther and Charlotte Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book A Page 75-260Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Sources for the family of William Luther and Charlotte Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11] (3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Jane _____

29. 5Rev. Annual Stroud MG, son of 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11] and Jane _____. Born on 14 May 1813 in North Carolina. Died on 8 July 1890 in Marengo, Crawford, Indiana, USA, 77 years old.

Married Elizabeth B. Larrance on 5 July 1834 in Crawford, Indiana when 21 years old (Elizabeth B. was 16 years old). Elizabeth B. Larrance b. on 10 Sep. 1817 in Fredonia, Crawford, Indiana; d. on 23 June 1892 in Marengo, 74 years old; bur. in Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs.

Issue of Rev. Annual Stroud MG and Elizabeth B. Larrance:

      i. son 6Wilson Stroud b. on 13 July 1835 in Crawford; d. in 1894 in Effingham, Illinois, 58 or 59 years old; m. Mary Ann Funk (14 Nov. 1838 in Indiana–11 Feb. 1894), dau. of Rheuben Funk (son of John Funk and Rebecca Padgett) and Lucinda Spencer, on 9 Aug. 1856 in Crawford when 21 years old (Mary Ann was 17 years old).
97   ii. son Elisha Stroud b. on 13 Nov. 1838 in Crawford.
98   iii. son Jeremiah Stroud b. on 11 Oct. 1842 in Crawford.
99   iv. son John Riley Stroud b. on 13 Oct. 1845 in Crawford.
100   v. dau. Malinda Jane Stroud b. on 25 Oct. 1848 in Crawford.
      vi. dau. Lucinda Stroud b. in 1851; d. before 1860, at most eight years old.
101   vii. son Thomas Landine Stroud b. on 27 Sep. 1854 in Marengo.
      viii. dau. Sarah Elizabeth Stroud b. on 16 April 1856 in Marengo.
      ix. son Joab Stroud b. in 1859 in Crawford.

Notes on Rev. Annual Stroud MG:

Occupation
Date: Lifelong
Place: , Crawford, Indiana
Note: was a pioneer United Brethern minister.
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Annual Stroud
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 14 SEP 1886 [22312]
Extracted text: Annual Stroud was frequently listed as a Minister of the Gospel in marriage records of Crawford Co. Recorded marriages with Annual as the MG were as follows: two in 1838, three in 1839, two in 1841, two in 1843 tow in 1845, three in 1847, two in 1849, two in 1850, six in 1851, two in 1852, two in 1853, five in 1854, two in 1855, two in 1856, two in 1857, eight in 1858, four in 1859, and one in 1860.

Census
Date: 1840
Place: , Crawford, Indiana
Note: census, p 919. 3000100000000 0000100000000

Census
Date: 1850
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): Line 501
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Census
Date: 1860
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township
See source 3 for this person
Page(s): Page 59, Line 420
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Listed as Emanuel

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township
See source 4 for this person
Page(s): Page 10, Line 71
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Annual, Elizabeth, Melinda, Thomas, Sarah E., and Joab listed.
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [22349]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [22350]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [22351]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township
See source 5 for this person
Page(s): NA Film T9-0270, Page 278A
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Aunal, Self, M, M, W, 66, Indiana Elizabeth, Wife, F, M, W, 63, Indiana Sarah, Dau, F, S, W, 23, Indiana Joab, Son, M, S, W, 21, Indiana
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [22364]

Event
Type: Cemetery
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs, Old Town) Cemetery, Marengo
Note: 'bªRev. Annual Stroud (1813-1890) UB reverend being buried directly in front of the old UB United Brethren Church with his brothers in Marengo, Indiana. The first tombstone in the picture has a bible on top which depicts a preacher during life. Annual was the elder son of Thomas & Jane Moore Stroud who married Elizabeth Larrance on July 3, 1834. Annual age 46 enlisted 23 April 1861 at Salem, Indiana to serve the Union Army being assigned to Co. G, 13'supªth'/supª Indiana Volunteers. Annual was a Wagon Master during the war and son Jeremiah Stroud age 18 enlisted in the 59'supªth'/supª Indiana Infantry. Annual reenlisted to finish the War, but Jeremiah was out of the war after only one year with disability. Jeremiah the third son of Annual lived near Miltown with wife Martha. Annual had a fourth son named John Riley who also became a reverend and UB preacher of the word of God like his father. John Riley married Rachael P. Purkhiser who had a son, my uncle George Stroud who I remember very well as a young boy of old town Marengo. Genealogy has given me a wonderful understanding of my family roots, who I am and from where I came.'/bª
See source 6 for this person

(Research):On Sept 21, 1843 Annual married a Michael Harvey and Mary Stroud Crawford county book page 319 record 903. Mary is person to be identified.

Notes for the family of Rev. Annual Stroud MG and Elizabeth B. Larrance:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book A page 140 record #512Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceEvent: Marriage ServiceType: Marriage ServicePlace: , Crawford, IndianaNote: Rev. Isaac BullingtonCensus: 1850Date: 1850Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run TownshipSee source 2 for this familyPage(s): page 82/42 line 501 listAssessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceExtracted text: Aniel Stroud age 36 born in North Carolina. All the following born in Crawford Coujnty: Elizabeth age 33 Wilson age 16 Elisha age 12 Jerimiah age 7 John R. age 4 Melinda age 1 Lavester Coleman age 19

Sources for Rev. Annual Stroud MG:

Source 1
Title: Craig Beeman, Notes of
ABBR: Notes of Craig Beeman
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1850 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1850 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Source 3
Title: 1860 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1860 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Source 4
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 5
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 6
Title: Personal knowledge of.
ABBR: Lance Stroud
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Rev. Annual Stroud MG and Elizabeth B. Larrance:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1850 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1850 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Elizabeth B. Larrance:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I660@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs, Old Town) Cemetery, Marengo [22792]

Other notes found list KY as place of birth

Last name may have been spelled “Larence”

30. 5Annanias Stroud, son of 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11] and Jane _____. Born on 22 May 1815 in Indiana. Died on 11 Jan. 1888 in Marengo, Crawford, Indiana, USA, 72 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs.

Married Mariah Bullington, dau. of Benjamin Bullington (son of William Bullington and Elizabeth _____) and Martha Weathers (dau. of William Weathers and Judah Elkins), on 24 Feb. 1834 in Crawford when 18 years old (Mariah was 18 years old). Mariah Bullington b. on 22 March 1815 in Indiana; d. on 3 Aug. 1900 in Marengo, 85 years old; bur. in Crawford.

Issue of Annanias Stroud and Mariah Bullington:

102   i. son 6William Stroud b. on 30 Oct. 1835 in Crawford.
103   ii. son Silas D. Stroud b. in 1838 in Indiana.
104   iii. son John Calvin Stroud b. in July 1840.
105   iv. dau. Martha T. Stroud b. about 1843.
106   v. dau. Malinda H. Stroud b. about 1845 in Indiana.
      vi. dau. Sarah Ann Stroud b. in 1850.
107   vii. dau. Eliza Caroline Stroud b. on 4 May 1854 in Crawford.
108   viii. son Beechem Stroud b. on 25 Sep. 1855 in Orange.
109   ix. dau. Lovey Stroud b. about 1859 in Orange.

Notes on Annanias Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I648@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs, Old Town) Cemetery, Marengo [22412]

Census
Date: 1850
Place: , Orange, Indiana
Note: census, p 374.

Census
Date: 1860
Place: , Orange, Indiana
Note: census, p 554.

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 23 Line 166
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0302, Page Number 96D
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Annias STROUD Self M Male W 65 IN Farming NC NC Mariah STROUD Wife M Female W 65 IN House Keeping TN TN Lovy STROUD Dau S Female W 21 IN Asst. House K. IN IN Leroy H. BOSLEY Other S Male W 21 IN Farm Hand IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [22443]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [22444]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [22445]

Note: there is a Caroline STROUD living in this household, b. abt 1855, that I cannot determine from the 1860 census as being a dau. of Annanias.

Notes for the family of Annanias Stroud and Mariah Bullington:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book A page 127 record #505Assessment: 4Event: Marriage ServiceType: Marriage ServicePlace: , Crawford, IndianaNote: Married by the Rev. Isaac BullCensus: 1850Date: 1850Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast TownshipSee source 2 for this familyExtracted text: In the 1850 census Annanias is listed with the last name ( Right). This appears to be a misprint as the previous entry was a Right. In any case the entries are as follows: “Annanias age 35 born in IN, wife Myriah age 35 born in IN, son William age 13 born in IN, son Silas D. age 11 born in IN, son John C. age 9 born in IN, daughter Martha I. age 7, born in IN, daughter Malinda age 5, born in IN and daughter Sara age 18 months, born in IN.Census: 1860Date: 1860Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast TownshipSee source 3 for this familyExtracted text: 0175-0175 Stroud, Ananius 45 M W Farmer $1,200 $600 IN Stroud, Mariah 45 F W IN Stroud, John 20 M W IN Stroud, Martha J. 17 F W IN Stroud, Malinda H. 13 F W IN Stroud, Sarah A. 10 F W IN Stroud, Eliza C. 8 F W IN Stroud, Beechem 5 M W IN Stroud, Lovey 1 F W IN

Sources for Annanias Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Annanias Stroud and Mariah Bullington:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1850 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1850 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Source 3
Title: 1860 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1860 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Mariah Bullington:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I661@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs, Old Town) Cemetery, Marengo [22815]

Census
Date: 1900
Place: , Orange, Indiana
Note: census, Southeast Township, 57-103.

31. 5Riley Stroud, son of 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11] and Jane _____. Born on 24 Dec. 1817 in Indiana. Died on 3 Nov. 1904 in Marengo, Crawford, Indiana, USA, 86 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs.

Married Nancy Jones on 3 March 1841 in Crawford when 23 years old (Nancy was 20 years old). Nancy Jones b. on 20 Nov. 1820 in Tennessee; d. on 14 June 1919, 98 years old; bur. in Crawford.

Issue of Riley Stroud and Nancy Jones:

110   i. son 6Aniel Stroud b. in Feb. 1842 in Crawford.
111   ii. son Elisha Hatfield Stroud b. in July 1866 in Crawford.

Notes on Riley Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I231@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs, Old Town) Cemetery, Marengo [12754]

Census
Date: 1850
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Line 460
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: A James Stroud age 17 is living with Riley.

Census
Date: 1860
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): Page 106, Line 754
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty Township
See source 3 for this person
Page(s): Page 6, Line 42
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [12775]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [12776]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [12777]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty Township
See source 4 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0271, Page Number 400D
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Riley STROUD Self M Male W 53 IN Farmer KY VA Nancy STROUD Wife M Female W 60 TN MD VA Eli H. STROUD GSon S Male W 14 IN Works On Farm IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [12792]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [12793]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [12794]

Event
Type: Note
Place: , Crawford, Indiana
See source 5 for this person
Page(s): Rilry Stroud
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 14 SEP 1886 [12801]
Extracted text: May have been named Riley. Records list Rial m Netty Morgan in 1822 and a Riley Stroud m Nancy Keyes 1841. As of Aug 1994, I am reasonably convinced that Rial STROUD who m. Netty MORGAN 1822, and Riley STROUD who m. Nancy KEY, 1841 are one and the same person, unless someone can locate some sort of probate record for a Rial STROUD between 1840 and 1849. Did Riley STROUD leave any sort of probate record naming his children, or can some of his descendants be identified who can clarify this matter.

Notes for the family of Riley Stroud and Nancy Jones:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book A page 242 record 794Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: On oath of Goldsberry Key.Census: 1850Date: 1850Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty TownshipSee source 2 for this familyPage(s): page 76/38 line 466 listAssessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceExtracted text: Riley Stroud age 33 born in Crawford Co wife Nancy age 26 born in Kentucky, and Aniel age 8 born in Crawford County and a James Stroud age 17 born in Crawford County in same household.

Sources for Riley Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1850 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1850 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1860 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1860 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Source 3
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 4
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 5
Title: Craig Beeman, Notes of
ABBR: Notes of Craig Beeman
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Riley Stroud and Nancy Jones:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1850 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1850 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Nancy Jones:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I825@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs, Old Town) Cemetery, Marengo [27416]

32. 5Sarah J. Stroud, dau. of 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11] and Jane _____. Born about 1819.

Married Alexander Barnett on 23 April 1834 in Crawford, Indiana when about 15 years old (Alexander was about 22 years old). Alexander Barnett b. about 1812 in Kentucky.

Issue of Sarah J. Stroud and Alexander Barnett:

112   i. son 6Stephen Barnett b. on 27 Nov. 1837.
      ii. dau. Mariah J Barnett b. about 1838 in Indiana.
      iii. dau. Martha A. Barnett b. about 1843 in Indiana.
      iv. dau. Mary E. Barnett b. in 1850 in Orange.

Notes on Alexander Barnett:

Census
Date: 1850
Place: , Orange, Indiana
Note: , Southeast Township, p. 380.

Notes for the family of Alexander Barnett and Sarah J. Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book A page 140 record #509Assessment: 4MarriageNote: Husbands name shown on license as “Burnett”

Sources for the family of Alexander Barnett and Sarah J. Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

33. 5John Stroud, son of 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11] and Jane _____. Born on 13 Nov. 1820 in Crawford, Indiana. Died on 11 March 1876 in Marengo, Crawford, Indiana, USA, 55 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs.

Married Martha Bobbitt in Orange. Martha Bobbitt b. on 13 Nov. 1820 in Valley, Chambers, Alabama, USA; d. on 11 March 1876 in Marengo, 55 years old; bur. in Crawford.

Issue of John Stroud and Martha Bobbitt:

      i. dau. 6Rhoda Stroud b. about 1845; m. George W. Garner on 2 Feb. 1870 in Crawford when about 25 years old.
113   ii. son James L. Stroud b. about 1849 in Orange.
      iii. son Isom Stroud b. about 1853 in Orange.
      iv. dau. Senora R. Stroud b. about 1856 in Orange; m. William W. Bates on 14 Sep. 1880 in Crawford when about 24 years old.
      v. son Samuel I. Stroud b. about 1858 in Orange.
114   vi. dau. Surrepta A. Stroud b. in 1858 in Valeene, Orange, Indiana.
115   vii. son William Isham Stroud b. in May 1850 in Indiana.
116   viii. dau. Nancy E. Stroud b. about 1860 in Orange.
      ix. dau. Martha E. Stroud b. about 1861 in Indiana; m. Jesse W. Foster on 19 July 1890 in Crawford when about 29 years old.
      x. dau. Lucrettia A. Stroud b. about 1863 in Indiana; m. William G. Pleasant on 7 Dec. 1886 in Crawford when about 23 years old.

Notes on John Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I651@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs, Old Town) Cemetery, Marengo [22498]

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 32, line 244
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: There are two Martha listings. Martha #1 born 1861 and Martha #2 born in 1869. Also living with the family is a Nancy Snowden listed as living with daughter.
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [22509]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [22510]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [22511]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0271, Page Number 383B
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: John STROUD Self M Male W 61 IN NC NC Martha STROUD Wife M Female W 60 TN Keeping House --- --- Surepty STROUD Dau S Female W 25 IN IN TN Nancy E. STROUD Dau S Female W 18 IN IN TN Loucretia A. STROUD Dau S Female W 16 IN IN TN William I. STROUD Son M Male W 22 IN Laborer IN TN William A. STROUD GSon S Male W 6 IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [22533]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [22534]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [22535]

Notes for the family of John Stroud and Martha Bobbitt:

Marriage License: , Orange, IndianaPlace: , Orange, IndianaSee source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C Page 2 127Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceCensus: 1850Date: 1850Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast TownshipSee source 2 for this familyExtracted text: John Stroud age 28 born in IN, Martha age 27 born in Alabama, Rhoda age 5 born in IN, Serepta age 4 born in IN and son James L. age 1 born in IN.Census: 1860Date: 1860Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast TownshipSee source 3 for this familyExtracted text: 0274-0274 Stroud, John 38 M W Farmer $500 $500 IN Stroud, Martha 38 F W AL Stroud, Ruda 15 F W IN Stroud, Serepta 13 F W IN Stroud, James L. 11 M W IN Stroud, Samuel J. 8 M W IN Stroud, Isom 2 M W IN Stroud, Sarah R. 4 F W IN

Sources for John Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of John Stroud and Martha Bobbitt:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1850 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1850 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Source 3
Title: 1860 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1860 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Martha Bobbitt:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I664@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs, Old Town) Cemetery, Marengo [22874]

34. 5Lucinda Stroud, dau. of 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11] and Jane _____. Born on 12 Dec. 1826 in Crawford, Indiana. Died on 28 July 1903, 76 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs.

Married Alexander P. Trotter on 15 April 1856 in Crawford when 29 years old (Alexander P. was 28 years old). Alexander P. Trotter b. on 9 Jan. 1828 in Virginia; d. on 18 May 1912 in Crawford, 84 years old; bur. in Crawford.

Issue of Lucinda Stroud and Alexander P. Trotter:

      i. son 6John T. B. Trotter b. on 22 Feb. 1857; d. on 28 Jan. 1862 in Crawford, four years old.
      ii. dau. Sarah Amelia J. Trotter b. on 14 Aug. 1860; d. on 14 Feb. 1862, a year old; bur. in Crawford.

Notes on Lucinda Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I653@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs, Old Town) Cemetery, Marengo [22585]

Notes on Alexander P. Trotter:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I666@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs, Old Town) Cemetery, Marengo [22906]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film T9-0270, Page 273C
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Alex P. Trotter, Self, M, M, W, 53, Virginia Lucida, Wife, F, M, W, 53, Indiana Armine L. Stroud, Niece, F, S, W, 15, Indiana
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [22918]

Notes for the family of Alexander P. Trotter and Lucinda Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book B page 271Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by Charles Sands, MG

Sources for Alexander P. Trotter:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Alexander P. Trotter and Lucinda Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

35. 5Joab Stroud, son of 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11] and Jane _____. Born on 9 July 1831 in Crawford, Indiana. Died on 26 Dec. 1881 in Marengo, Crawford, Indiana, USA, 50 years old.

Married Sarah Ann Polson, dau. of Henry H. Polson, on 12 June 1853 in Washington when 21 years old (Sarah Ann was 19 years old). Sarah Ann Polson b. on 8 June 1834 in Indiana; d. on 15 Dec. 1869 in Marengo, 35 years old.

Issue of Joab Stroud and Sarah Ann Polson:

      i. dau. 6Sarah M. Stroud b. in 1858 in Crawford.
      ii. dau. Lenora R. Stroud b. in 1860 in Indiana.
      iii. dau. Anna L. Stroud b. about 1865 in Indiana.

Notes on Joab Stroud:

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 9, Line 63
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [22609]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [22610]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [22611]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0271, Page Number 401B
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Joab STROUD Self M Male W 48 IN Farmer NC NC Sarah A. STROUD Wife M Female W 47 IN Keeping House IN IN Lenora R. STROUD Dau S Female W 20 IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [22626]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [22627]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [22628]

Notes for the family of Joab Stroud and Sarah Ann Polson:

MarriageNote: Book F, Pg 279

Sources for Joab Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Sixth Generation


Issue of 5Hiram Stroud [13] (4Pvt. Jesse Stroud American Patriot [8], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Sarah Fox

36. 6Elizabeth Stroud, dau. of 5Hiram Stroud [13] and Sarah Fox. Born about 1838 in Floyd, Indiana.

Married Pleasant L. Ingram on 7 July 1854 in Floyd when about 16 years old (Pleasant L. was 17 or 18 years old). Pleasant L. Ingram b. in 1836 in Indiana.

Issue of Elizabeth Stroud and Pleasant L. Ingram:

      i. dau. 7Laura A. Ingram b. in 1860 in Indiana.
      ii. dau. Florence E. Ingram b. in 1862 in Indiana.
      iii. son Harry Ingram b. in 1866 in Indiana.
      iv. son Sylvester Ingram b. in 1868 in Indiana.
      v. dau. Emma Ingram b. in 1870 in Indiana.
      vi. dau. Rosa E. Ingram b. in 1873 in Indiana.
      vii. dau. Cora Ingram b. in 1876 in Indiana.

Notes on Pleasant L. Ingram:

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Daviess, Indiana, Veale Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0271, Page Number 510A
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Pleasant INGRAM Self M Male W 44 IN Day Laborer IN IN Elisabeth INGRAM Wife M Female W 42 IN Keeping House IN IN Laura A. INGRAM Dau S Female W 20 IN House Work IN IN Florence E. INGRAM Dau S Female W 18 IN House Work IN IN Herry INGRAM Son S Male W 14 IN Farm Hand IN IN Sylvester INGRAM Son S Male W 12 IN Farm Hand IN IN Emma INGRAM Dau S Female W 10 IN At Home IN IN Rosa E. INGRAM Dau S Female W 7 IN At Home IN IN Cora INGRAM Dau S Female W 4 IN At Home IN IN Charles MARSHAL Other S Male W 18 KY Farm Hand KY KY
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [213034]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [213035]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [213036]

Notes for the family of Pleasant L. Ingram and Elizabeth Stroud:

MarriageNote: Record 4-82

Sources for Pleasant L. Ingram:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

37. 6Sylvania Stroud, dau. of 5Hiram Stroud [13] and Sarah Fox. Born about 1843 in Floyd, Indiana.

Married Silas Smith on 29 Oct. 1872 in Floyd when about 29 years old (Silas was 30 or 31 years old). Silas Smith b. in 1841 in Ohio.

Issue of Sylvania Stroud and Silas Smith:

      i. dau. 7Bertha May Smith b. in 1876 in Indiana.

Notes on Silas Smith:

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Jackson, Indiana, Hamilton Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0286, Page Number 80B
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Silas SMITH Self M Male W 39 OH Laborer OH VA Sylvania SMITH Wife M Female W 33 IN Keeping House --- --- Burthy May SMITH Dau S Female W 4 IN OH IN Charles LOOKABILL Other S Male W 16 IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [213101]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [213102]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [213103]

Notes for the family of Silas Smith and Sylvania Stroud:

MarriageNote: Record 7-124

Sources for Silas Smith:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

38. 6Jane Stroud, dau. of 5Hiram Stroud [13] and Sarah Fox. Born about 1846 in Floyd, Indiana.

Married Robert Newman on 14 Feb. 1867 in Floyd when about 21 years old (Robert was 19 or 20 years old). Robert Newman b. in 1847 in Indiana.

Issue of Jane Stroud and Robert Newman:

      i. dau. 7Ora Newman b. in 1868 in Indiana.
      ii. dau. Emma Newman b. in 1870 in Indiana.
      iii. dau. Rosa Newman b. in 1872 in Indiana.
      iv. son Rodgers Newman b. in 1875 in Indiana.
      v. son Rufus Newman b. in 1877 in Indiana.

Notes on Robert Newman:

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Clark, Indiana, Wood Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0269, Page Number 305A
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Robert NEWMAN Self M Male W 33 IN Farm Laborer --- --- Jane NEWMAN Wife M Female W 32 IN Keeping House NC NC Ora NEWMAN Dau S Female W 12 IN IN IN Emma NEWMAN Dau S Female W 10 IN IN IN Rosa NEWMAN Dau S Female W 8 IN IN IN Rodgers NEWMAN Son S Male W 5 IN IN IN Rufus NEWMAN Son S Male W 3 IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [213068]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [213069]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [213070]

Notes for the family of Robert Newman and Jane Stroud:

MarriageNote: Record 6-303

Sources for Robert Newman:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of Wilson Taylor and 5Elizabeth Stroud [14] (4Pvt. Jesse Stroud American Patriot [8], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1])

39. 6Nield Taylor, son of Wilson Taylor and 5Elizabeth Stroud [14]. Born about 1838.

Married _____ _____.

Issue of Nield Taylor and _____ _____:

      i. son 7Ben F. Taylor .

Notes on Nield Taylor:

(Research):Civil War - New Albany National Cemetery listed the following: Taylor, Nield, d. 05/04/1929, PVT K 17TH IND INF CW, Plot: D 3274, bur. 05/06/1929. Could be same person?


Issue of William Kenworthy and 5Lucretia Skeen [16] (4Lydia Stroud [9], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1])

40. 6Abijah Kenworthy, son of William Kenworthy and 5Lucretia Skeen [16]. Born about 1808 in Ohio. Died on 19 Feb. 1873 in Avon, Polk, Iowa, USA, about 65 years old.

Married Sophronia Kent on 22 March 1832 in Clinton, Indiana when about 24 years old (Sophronia was 18 years old). Sophronia Kent b. on 15 Dec. 1813 in Herrick Center, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania; d. on 7 Jan. 1873 in Avon, 59 years old.

Issue of Abijah Kenworthy and Sophronia Kent:

      i. dau. 7Eliza Kenworthy b. about 1833 in Boone.
      ii. son Leander C. Kenworthy b. about 1835 in Boone.
      iii. son Fernando D. C. Kenworthy b. on 17 Feb. 1841 in Boone; d. on 6 Dec. 1912, 71 years old.
      iv. son Steele O. Kenworthy b. about 1844 in Boone.
      v. son Silas B. Kenworthy b. about 1846 in Boone.
      vi. dau. Harriet E. Kenworthy b. in 1849 in Boone.
      vii. son Charles Kenworthy b. about 1852 in Boone.
      viii. dau. Ella Kenworthy b. about 1857 in Boone.

Notes on Abijah Kenworthy:

Birth
See source 1 for this person

Sources for Abijah Kenworthy:

Source 1
Title: 1850 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1850 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Sophronia Kent:

Birth
See source 1 for this person

Sources for Sophronia Kent:

Source 1
Title: 1850 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1850 US Census
_PAREN: Y

41. 6Sarah Kenworthy, dau. of William Kenworthy and 5Lucretia Skeen [16]. Born on 30 Dec. 1810 in Coshocton, Coshocton, Ohio. Died on 4 Sep. 1849 in Thorntown, Boone, Indiana, 38 years old.

Married James Philips Mills, son of James Mills and _____ Marian, on 22 Nov. 1832 when 21 years old (James Philips was 24 years old). James Philips Mills b. on 22 Aug. 1808 in York, Pennsylvania; d. on 22 April 1889, 80 years old.

Issue of Sarah Kenworthy and James Philips Mills:

      i. son 7William Wallace Mills .
      ii. dau. Marietta Mills .
      iii. dau. Eliza Jane Mills .
      iv. son Emmett Mills .
      v. son Allen Mills .
      vi. son John Mills .
      vii. dau. Caroline Mills .
      viii. son Thomas Edwin Mills .
117   ix. son Brigadier General Anson Mills United States Army b. on 21 Aug. 1834 in Thorntown.

Notes on James Philips Mills:

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Boone, Indiana, Sugar Creek Township
See source 1 for this person
Extracted text: Mills, James P., age 61.
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [82778]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [82779]

Sources for James Philips Mills:

Source 1
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

42. 6David Kenworthy, son of William Kenworthy and 5Lucretia Skeen [16]. Born on 10 Oct. 1816 in Ohio. Died on 3 May 1877 in Lebanon, Boone, Indiana, 60 years old.

Married Sarah Ann Burkhalter, , on 20 Dec. 1837 in Boone, Indiana when 21 years old (Sarah Ann was 21 years old). Sarah Ann Burkhalter b. on 26 April 1816 in Indiana; d. on 29 May 1904 in Lebanon, 88 years old.

Issue of David Kenworthy and Sarah Ann Burkhalter:

      i. dau. 7Sophronia A. Kenworthy b. on 14 Aug. 1839 in Thorntown, Boone, Indiana; d. on 9 April 1859 in Lebanon, 19 years old; m. Samuel M. Shipp (abt. 1839 in Indiana–).
118   ii. son William A. Kenworthy b. on 23 May 1841 in Thorntown.
119   iii. son Thomas Perry Kenworthy b. on 11 April 1843 in Thorntown.
      iv. son John J. Kenworthy b. on 8 Nov. 1845 in Thorntown; d. on 11 Nov. 1872 in Lebanon, 27 years old.
      v. dau. Mary E. Kenworthy b. on 24 Oct. 1853 in Boone; d. on 20 Dec. 1873 in Lebanon, 20 years old; m. James D. Wilson (abt. 1851 in New York–).
      vi. son Jeremiah D. Kenworthy b. on 26 July 1856 in Lebanon; d. on 31 March 1922, 65 years old; m. May McCUNE (abt. 1860–).

Notes on David Kenworthy:

Notes for the family of David Kenworthy and Sarah Ann Burkhalter:

See source 1 for this familyExtracted text: Burkhalter Sarah Kinworthy David Boone 12-20-1837

Sources for the family of David Kenworthy and Sarah Ann Burkhalter:

Source 1
Title: Indiana Marriages through 1850
ABBR: Indiana Marriages through 1850
_PAREN: Y

43. 6Allen Kenworthy, son of William Kenworthy and 5Lucretia Skeen [16]. Born about 1818 in Ohio.

Married Mary Elizabeth Long on 23 Jan. 1843 in Montgomery, Indiana when about 25 years old (Mary Elizabeth was about 20 years old). Mary Elizabeth Long b. about 1823 in Ohio.

Issue of Allen Kenworthy and Mary Elizabeth Long:

      i. son 7Squire L. Kenworthy b. about 1844 in Indiana.
      ii. son William Kenworthy b. about 1846 in Indiana.
      iii. son Oliver H. Kenworthy b. about 1846 in Indiana.
      iv. dau. Ellen J. Kenworthy b. about 1847 in Boone.
      v. son John Kenworthy b. about 1849.
      vi. dau. Sarah Kenworthy .

Notes on Allen Kenworthy:

Birth
See source 1 for this person
See source 2 for this person
Extracted text: Census Records: Indiana, 1860, Kenworthy, Allen Age : 40 Year(s) Birthplace : Ohio County / Township : Boone / Sugar Creek Post Office : Thorntown State : IN Census Page / Line Number : 0887 / 17A National Archive Series / Microfilm Number : M653 / 245 Job / Job Code : Farmer / 001 - Farmer Real / Personal Property : $9124 / $4213 Head of Household : Y Literate : Yes Family Number : 0623 Dwelling Number : 0638.
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [930441]

Notes for the family of Allen Kenworthy and Mary Elizabeth Long:

See source 1 for this family

Sources for Allen Kenworthy:

Source 1
Title: 1850 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1850 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1860 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1860 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Allen Kenworthy and Mary Elizabeth Long:

Source 1
Title: Indiana Marriages Through 1850Long Elizabeth Kenworthy Allen Montgomery 01-23-1843.
ABBR: Indiana Marriages Through 1850Long Elizabeth Kenworthy Allen Montgomery 01-23-1843.
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Mary Elizabeth Long:

Birth
See source 1 for this person
See source 2 for this person

Sources for Mary Elizabeth Long:

Source 1
Title: 1850 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1850 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1860 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1860 US Census
_PAREN: Y

44. 6John Kenworthy, son of William Kenworthy and 5Lucretia Skeen [16]. Born about 1821 in Ohio.

Married first Bracia ’kenworthy’. Bracia ’kenworthy’ b. about 1826 in Ohio; d. between 1850 and 1860.

Issue of John Kenworthy and Bracia ’kenworthy’:

      i. son 7Jefferson Kenworthy b. about 1845 in Boone, Indiana.
      ii. son Abijah Kenworthy b. about 1848 in Boone.

Married second Phebe Brewer before 1860. Phebe Brewer b. about 1828 in Ohio.

Notes on John Kenworthy:

Name: John /KENWORTHY/
See source 1 for this person
Extracted text: Roll 136, Page 96 Dist. 7, Boone Co. IN 13 Aug 501/509 John Kenworthy 28 OH laborer
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [930519]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: Walker, Moniteau, Missouri
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0704, Page Number 486B
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: John KENWORTHY Self M Male W 60 OH Farmer OH OH Pheba KENWORTY Wife M Female W 55 OH Keeping House OH OH
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [930537]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [930538]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [930539]

Sources for John Kenworthy:

Source 1
Title: 1850 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1850 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Bracia ’kenworthy’:

Name: Bracia /’KENWORTHY’/
See source 1 for this person
Extracted text: Roll 136, Page 96 Dist. 7, Boone Co. IN 13 Aug 501/509 Bracia 23 OH
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [930555]

Sources for Bracia ’kenworthy’:

Source 1
Title: 1850 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1850 US Census
_PAREN: Y


Issue of 5John Skeen [17] (4Lydia Stroud [9], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Rebecca Walker

45. 6Lydia Skeen, dau. of 5John Skeen [17] and Rebecca Walker. Born on 25 April 1817 in Highland, Highland, Ohio. Died on 5 March 1876 in Marion, Linn, Iowa, 58 years old.

Married Joshua Routh, son of Issac Routh and Sarah Sloat, on 12 March 1836 in Boone, Indiana when 18 years old (Joshua was 20 or 21 years old). Joshua Routh b. in 1815 in Ohio.

Issue of Lydia Skeen and Joshua Routh:

120   i. dau. 7Lydia Routh b. in 1854 in Tippecanoe.

46. 6William R. Skeen, son of 5John Skeen [17] and Rebecca Walker. Born on 8 Feb. 1832 in Boone, Indiana. Died in Marion, Linn, Iowa.

Married Martha Milton, dau. of John Milton, on 27 Dec. 1860 when 28 years old.

Issue of William R. Skeen and Martha Milton:

      i. son 7John Skeen .
      ii. son Robert W. Skeen .
      iii. son Abraham S. Skeen .
      iv. dau. Mala H. Skeen .
      v. son Thomas J. Skeen .
      vi. dau. Bessie Skeen .
      vii. dau. Nora Skeen .

Notes on William R. Skeen:

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Marion, Iowa


Issue of 5Isham (Isom) Stroud [18] (4John Stroud [10], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Sarah McCRARY

47. 6Julian Stroud, son of 5Isham (Isom) Stroud [18] and Sarah McCRARY. Born in March 1813 in Orange, Indiana. Died in Feb. 1865 in Orange, 51 years old.

Married Mariah Blackburn on 5 Sep. 1833 when 20 years old (Mariah was 21 years old). Mariah Blackburn b. on 20 Nov. 1811 in Kentucky; d. after 1884, at least 73 years old.

Issue of Julian Stroud and Mariah Blackburn:

121   i. son 7William H. Stroud b. about 1842 in Orange.
122   ii. son Samuel J. Stroud b. in May 1844 in Orange.
      iii. son Isom Stroud b. in 1849 in Indiana; d. in Sep. 1865, 15 or 16 years old.
      iv. dau. Sarah A. Stroud b. in April 1852.
123   v. dau. Clary Elizabeth Stroud b. in July 1854 in Crawford.

Notes on Julian Stroud:

Census
Date: 1850
Place: , Orange, Indiana
Note: census, Southeast Township, page 377.

Census
Date: 1860
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 101, Line 710
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Notes for the family of Julian Stroud and Mariah Blackburn:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book A page 135 record #491Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceEvent: Marriage ServiceType: Marriage ServicePlace: , Crawford, IndianaNote: Married by Isaac Bullington

Sources for Julian Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1860 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1860 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Julian Stroud and Mariah Blackburn:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Mariah Blackburn:

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Patoka Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 12 Line 111
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Mariah age 52, and Elizabeth age 16.
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [81655]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [81656]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [81657]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township
Note: Living with George Vance family.

Event
Type: Pension
Date: 31 JAN 1884
Place: , Crawford, Indiana
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): Application 237,890 certificate 205,371
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Dependent mother’s pension for Maria Stroud (application 237,890 certificate 205,371) In a notorized statement from Maria Stroud, dated Jan. 31, 1884, she said her post office in 1862 and 1863 was Pedina, Crawford CO. Ind. Since then it had been Marengo, Crawford Co. Ind. members of her family in 1862 were: herself, born Nov. 20, 1811; her husband, Julian Stroud, born March 1813, he died in Feb. 1865; Mary Stroud, born in 1837 and had to do for herself from the time she was able, she was married March 1854; William Stroud, born in 1841, he had to do for himself mostly from the time he was able to do so, he married in 1864, he was in the army, 23 Reg. Ind. Vols. Co. G and was wounded at Vicksburg 1863; Samuel Stroud, born May 1844, went in army 1862 and died 1862 (illegible, maybe Isum) Stroud, born 1847, blind and helpless to day of his death, he died Sept. 1865 Clary E. Stroud bon July 1854, was married in 1879 Sarah A. Stroud was born April 1852, died in infancy She said none of her children were able to take care of her - all were poor. In another declaration, she said she had been married Sept. 5, 1832 in Crawford Co. Indiana. In a statement, Robert Blackburn and Mary Belcher, who had been neighbors of Julian and Mariah Stroud, parents of Samuel Stroud, said that the physical condition of Julian had not been good. He had the palsy or paralytic affliction so bad that he couldn’t work.
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [81712]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [81713]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [81714]

Sources for Mariah Blackburn:

Source 1
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: Pension records
ABBR: Pension records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

48. 6Catharine Stroud, dau. of 5Isham (Isom) Stroud [18] and Sarah McCRARY. Born about 1815 in Indiana.

Married Ogleby Sevedge in Orange. Ogleby Sevedge b. about 1818 in Indiana.

Issue of Catharine Stroud and Ogleby Sevedge:

      i. dau. 7Martha Sevedge b. about 1836 in Indiana; m. John W. Southit.
124   ii. dau. Sarah Sevedge b. about 1840 in Indiana.
      iii. dau. Lydia Sevedge b. about 1842 in Indiana.
125   iv. son Isom Sevedge b. about 1830 in Indiana.
      v. dau. Surepta Sevedge b. about 1847 in Indiana.
      vi. son Lafayette Sevedge b. about 1853 in Indiana.
      vii. dau. Surenia Sevedge b. about 1856 in Indiana.

Notes on Ogleby Sevedge:

Census
Date: 1850
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 17 Line 118
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0302, Page Number 95B
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Ogle SEVEDGE Self M Male W 63 IN Farming NC NC Catharine SEVEDGE Wife M Female W 65 IN House Keeping NC NC Lafaette SEVEDGE Son S Male W 27 IN Farm Hand IN IN Catharine HOSKINS GDau S Female W 12 IN Asst. House K. IN IN John R. HOSKINS GSon S Male W 9 IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [81755]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [81756]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [81757]

Also found spelled as Sevedge

Notes for the family of Ogleby Sevedge and Catharine Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C-2, page 65Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceMarriageNote: Record C-2 65Census: 1850Date: 1850Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast TownshipSee source 2 for this familyExtracted text: Ogle age 32 born in IN, Catherine age 35 born in IN, Martha age 14 born in IN, Sara age 10 born in IN, Lydia age 8 born in IN, Isom age 6 born in IN, and Surepta C age 3 born in IN.

Sources for Ogleby Sevedge:

Source 1
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Ogleby Sevedge and Catharine Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1850 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1850 US Census
_PAREN: Y

49. 6Sarah Stroud, dau. of 5Isham (Isom) Stroud [18] and Sarah McCRARY. Born about 1818 in Indiana.

Married William Key on 16 June 1834 in Orange when about 16 years old (William was 24 or 25 years old). William Key b. in 1809 in Tennessee.

Issue of Sarah Stroud and William Key:

      i. dau. 7Lavesta Key b. about 1835 in Orange.
126   ii. dau. Lucinda Key b. in June 1836 in Orange.
      iii. dau. Winnie Key b. in 1838 in Orange.
127   iv. son Theophilus Key b. on 5 Sep. 1839 in Orange.
      v. son Isam Key b. about 1841 in Orange.
128   vi. son John Key b. about 1842 in Orange.
129   vii. son Joel Key b. about 1845 in Orange.
130   viii. dau. Susannah Key b. about 1847 in Orange.

Notes on William Key:

Census
Date: 1850
Place: , Orange, Indiana
Note: census, Southeast Township, p. 377.

Notes for the family of William Key and Sarah Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C-2-56Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceMarriageNote: Record C-2 55Marriage License: , Orange, IndianaPlace: , Orange, IndianaCensus: 1850Date: 1850Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast TownshipSee source 2 for this familyExtracted text: William Key age 41 school teacher born in TN, wife Sara age 32 born in IN., note; all children listed as born in IN, Lavesta age 15, Linda age 13, Winnie age 12, Theoplius age 10, Isom age 9, John age 8, Joel age 6 and Susannah age 3.

Sources for the family of William Key and Sarah Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1850 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1850 US Census
_PAREN: Y

50. 6Mary Stroud, dau. of 5Isham (Isom) Stroud [18] and Sarah McCRARY. Born about 1818 in Indiana.

Married Goldsberry Key on 13 Feb. 1840 in Orange when about 22 years old. Goldsberry Key b. between 1806 and 1808 in North Carolina; d. after 1850 in Indiana; m. (1) _____ _____.

Issue of Mary Stroud and Goldsberry Key:

      i. son 7Waddy W. Key b. about 1832 in Kentucky.
      ii. dau. Alsey Key b. about 1836 in Indiana.
131   iii. son Martin V. Key b. in 1838 in Indiana.
132   iv. dau. Sarah Adeline Key b. on 8 Feb. 1841.
      v. son Charles Key b. about 1843.
      vi. dau. Isabel Key b. about 1846.
      vii. son Wesley Key b. about 1849.
      viii. son Riley Key b. in 1852 in Indiana.
      ix. son Elijah Key b. about 1855 in Indiana.
      x. dau. Delilia Key b. about 1855 in Indiana.
      xi. dau. Nancy Key b. about 1856 in Indiana.
133   xii. son Aniel Key b. in 1864 in Indiana.

Notes on Goldsberry Key:

Census
Date: 1840
Place: , Crawford, Indiana
See source 1 for this person
Extracted text: Males: 11000100 Females: 01101010
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [81806]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [81807]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0302, Page Number 94C
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Goolsbury KEY Self M Male W 72 NC Farming NC NC Mary KEY Wife M Female W 61 IN House Keeping NC NC Delilia KEY Dau S Female W 24 IN Asst. House K. NC IN Aniel KEY Son S Male W 16 IN Farm Hand NC IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [81824]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [81825]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [81826]

(Research):Goolsbury supposely had 3 children by his first wife and 9 by Mary Stroud.

Notes for the family of Goldsberry Key and Mary Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C-2-98Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceMarriageNote: Record C-2 98Census: 1850Date: 1850Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast TownshipSee source 2 for this familyExtracted text: Goldsberry age 42 born in TN, wife Mary age 32 born in IN, Waddy W. Key age 18 born in KY., daughter Alsey age 14 born in IN., son Martin N. age 12 born in IN., daughter Sara age 9 born in IN., son Charles age 7 born in IN., daughter Isabel age 4 born in IN., and son Wesley age 1 born in IN.

Notes for the family of Goldsberry Key and _____ _____:

GEDCOM Child already has parents: 0 @F7747@ FAM ◊ 1 CHIL @I3578@ [1540311]!GEDCOM Child already has parents: 0 @F7747@ FAM ◊ 1 CHIL @I3579@ [1540313]!GEDCOM Child already has parents: 0 @F7747@ FAM ◊ 1 CHIL @I3580@ [1540314]

Sources for Goldsberry Key:

Source 1
Title: 1840 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1840 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Goldsberry Key and Mary Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1850 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1850 US Census
_PAREN: Y

51. 6Lucretia Stroud, dau. of 5Isham (Isom) Stroud [18] and Sarah McCRARY. Born about 1820 in Indiana.

Married William Mackey in Orange. William Mackey b. about 1820 in North Carolina.

Issue of Lucretia Stroud and William Mackey:

      i. son 7Abraham Mackey b. about 1843 in Indiana; d. in 1903 in Indiana, about 60 years old; m. Emeline _____ (–aft. 1904 in Indiana).
      ii. dau. Nursey Mackey b. about 1849 in Indiana.

Notes on William Mackey:

Notes for the family of William Mackey and Lucretia Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C-2-113Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceMarriageNote: Record C-2 113

Sources for the family of William Mackey and Lucretia Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

52. 6Lydia M. Stroud, dau. of 5Isham (Isom) Stroud [18] and Sarah McCRARY. Born about 1823 in Indiana.

Married Lewis Suddarth on 26 Aug. 1839 in Orange when about 16 years old (Lewis was about 29 years old). Lewis Suddarth b. about 1810 in Kentucky; d. in 1869 in Taswell, Crawford, Indiana, about 59 years old; bur. in Crawford, Indiana, Highfill Chapel Cemetery.

Issue of Lydia M. Stroud and Lewis Suddarth:

134   i. dau. 7Sarah Victoria Suddarth b. on 31 Jan. 1842 in Crawford.
      ii. son James Suddarth b. in May 1844 in Crawford.
      iii. son Patience Suddarth b. in Aug. 1846 in Crawford; d. in Oct. 1910, 64 years old.
135   iv. son Jeremiah Suddarth b. on 29 May 1848 in Crawford.
136   v. son John Wesley Suddarth b. about 1852 in Crawford.
      vi. dau. Mary Elizabeth Suddarth b. on 24 Nov. 1854 in Crawford; d. on 16 April 1931, 76 years old.
      vii. son Samuel (Daniel?) David Suddarth b. on 17 Oct. 1857 in Crawford; d. in 1915, 57 or 58 years old; m. Nancy J. Knight (1862 in Indiana–), dau. of Robert Knight and Rachel _____, on 17 Feb. 1882 in Crawford when 24 years old (Nancy J. was 19 or 20 years old).
137   viii. son Joseph Boyde Suddarth b. on 27 May 1860 in Crawford.
      ix. dau. Deliha J. Suddarth b. in May 1864 in Crawford; d. on 28 Jan. 1930, 65 years old.
      x. son William E. Suddarth b. in May 1864 in Crawford; d. in Aug. 1925, 61 years old; m. Martha Mock.
138   xi. son Andrew S. Suddarth b. on 3 Aug. 1868 in Crawford.

Notes on Lydia M. Stroud:

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Patoka Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 13 Line 94
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [162736]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [162737]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [162738]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Patoka Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0271, Page Number 368B
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Lydia SUDDARTH Self W Female W 57 IN Keeping House NC NC Samuel SUDDARTH Son S Male W 22 IN Farmer KY IN Joseph B. SUDDARTH Son S Male W 20 IN Farmer KY IN Wm. E. SUDDARTH Son Male W 15 IN At Home KY IN Delila J. SUDDARTH Dau Female W 15 IN At Home KY IN Andrew S. SUDDARTH Son S Male W 12 IN At Home KY IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [162759]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [162760]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [162761]

Sources for Lydia M. Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Lewis Suddarth:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I8578@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Highfill Chapel Cemetery, Taswell [162709]

Census
Date: 1860
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 98, Line 687
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Notes for the family of Lewis Suddarth and Lydia M. Stroud:

MarriageNote: Record C-2 95Marriage License: , Orange, IndianaPlace: , Orange, Indiana

Sources for Lewis Suddarth:

Source 1
Title: 1860 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1860 US Census
_PAREN: Y

53. 6John Stroud, son of 5Isham (Isom) Stroud [18] and Sarah McCRARY. Born about 1824 in Indiana.

Married Elizabeth Blackburn on 23 Jan. 1846 in Orange when about 22 years old (Elizabeth was about 16 years old). Elizabeth Blackburn b. about 1830 in Indiana.

Issue of John Stroud and Elizabeth Blackburn:

      i. son 7Isom Stroud b. about 1849 in Orange.

Notes on John Stroud:

Event
Type: Note
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): John Stroud
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 14 SEP 1886 [81528]
Extracted text: Craig Beeman Note: I attribute this individual to Isham’s family per Orange Co., IN, Deed Record 15-105, in spite of the fact that I cannot place Isom STROUD w/ wife Mary J. 1850 Orange Co., IN census, Southeast TWP, p. 377. Did John’s first wife die prior to 1870? If so, is he the John STROUD who appears w/ wife Julia & family in the 1870 Crawford Co., IN census, p.128?

Notes for the family of John Stroud and Elizabeth Blackburn:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C-3-54Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceMarriageNote: Record C-3 54Census: 1850Date: 1850Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast TownshipNote: page 380 line 131. John Stroud age 29 born in IN., wife Elizabeth age 20 born in IN., son Isom age 1 born in IN.

Sources for John Stroud:

Source 1
Title: Craig Beeman, Notes of
ABBR: Notes of Craig Beeman
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of John Stroud and Elizabeth Blackburn:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

54. 6Sereptia Stroud, dau. of 5Isham (Isom) Stroud [18] and Sarah McCRARY. Born about 1828 in Orange, Indiana.

Married Samuel Bird on 10 Oct. 1850 in Orange when about 22 years old (Samuel was 32 or 33 years old). Samuel Bird b. in 1817 in Tennessee.

Issue of Sereptia Stroud and Samuel Bird:

      i. dau. 7Martha A. Bird b. about 1851 in Orange.
      ii. dau. Lydia R. Bird b. about 1857 in Orange.
      iii. dau. Elisha Bird b. about 1860 in Orange.
      iv. son Samuel B. Bird b. in 1864 in Indiana.
      v. son George A. Bird b. in 1868 in Indiana.

Notes on Samuel Bird:

Census
Date: 1860
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0302, Page Number 83A
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Samuel BIRD Self M Male W 63 TN Farmer TN TN Sarepta BIRD Wife M Female W 52 IN House Keeper KY TN Samuel B. BIRD Son S Male W 16 IN Farm Hand IN IN George A. BIRD Son S Male W 12 IN Farm Hand TN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [81893]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [81894]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [81895]

Notes for the family of Samuel Bird and Sereptia Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C-3-333Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Sources for Samuel Bird:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Samuel Bird and Sereptia Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

55. 6Rebecca Stroud, dau. of 5Isham (Isom) Stroud [18] and Sarah McCRARY. Born about 1833 in Orange, Indiana.

Married William Roberts on 5 June 1854 in Orange when about 21 years old (William was 27 or 28 years old). William Roberts b. in 1826 in Indiana.

Issue of Rebecca Stroud and William Roberts:

      i. dau. 7Milly Roberts b. in 1863 in Indiana.
      ii. dau. Sarah Roberts b. in 1869 in Indiana.

Notes on William Roberts:

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0302, Page Number 95A
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: William ROBERTS Self M Male W 54 IN Farming VA VA Rebecca ROBERTS Wife M Female W 47 IN House Keeping NC NC Milly ROBERTS Dau S Female W 17 IN Asst. House K. IN IN Sarah ROBERTS Dau S Female W 11 IN Asst. House K. IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [81926]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [81927]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [81928]

Notes for the family of William Roberts and Rebecca Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C-3-550Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Sources for William Roberts:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of William Roberts and Rebecca Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

56. 6Susannah Stroud, dau. of 5Isham (Isom) Stroud [18] and Sarah McCRARY. Born on 15 June 1835 in Salem, Washington, Indiana, USA.

Married John W. Padgett on 28 March 1854 in Orange, Indiana when 18 years old (John W. was 22 or 23 years old). John W. Padgett b. in 1831 in Indiana; d. on 9 June 1894 in Paoli, Orange, Indiana, 62 or 63 years old; bur. in Orange, Indiana, Old Town Cemetery.

Issue of Susannah Stroud and John W. Padgett:

      i. dau. 7Sarah A. Padgett b. in 1856 in Indiana.
      ii. son William Padgett b. in 1858 in Indiana.
      iii. son George Padgett b. in 1859 in Indiana.
      iv. son Samuel Padgett b. in 1862 in Indiana.
      v. son John Padgett b. in 1865 in Indiana.
      vi. son Benjamin Padgett b. in 1867 in Indiana.
      vii. son David Padgett b. in 1869 in Indiana.
      viii. dau. Stella Padgett b. in 1873 in Indiana.
      ix. dau. Ernie Padgett b. in 1877 in Indiana.
      x. dau. Ethel Padgett b. in 1878 in Indiana.

Notes on John W. Padgett:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3429@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Orange, Indiana, Old Town Cemetery, Paoli [81966]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: Paoli, Orange, Indiana
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0302, Page Number 212B
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: John W. PADGETT Self M Male W 49 IN Farmer VA VA Susanna PADGETT Wife M Female W 44 IN Keeping House NC NC Sarah A. PADGETT Dau S Female W 24 IN At Home IN IN William PADGETT Son S Male W 22 IN At Home IN IN George PADGETT Son S Male W 21 IN At Home IN IN Samul PADGETT Son S Male W 18 IN At Home IN IN John PADGETT Son S Male W 15 IN At Home IN IN Benjamin PADGETT Son S Male W 13 IN At Home IN IN David PADGETT Son S Male W 11 IN At Home IN IN Stella PADGETT Dau S Female W 7 IN At Home IN IN Ethel PADGETT Dau S Female W 2 IN IN IN Ermie PADGETT Dau S Female W 3 IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [81997]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [81998]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [81999]

Notes for the family of John W. Padgett and Susannah Stroud:

MarriageNote: Record C-3-538

Sources for John W. Padgett:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

57. 6Isom Stroud, son of 5Isham (Isom) Stroud [18] and Sarah McCRARY. Born on 27 Jan. 1840 in Orange, Indiana. Died on 19 March 1914, 74 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Union Chapel Cemetery.

Married Christina Jones, dau. of Henry Jones and Margaret Crecelius (dau. of Jacob Crecelius and Christena _____), on 7 March 1861 in Orange when 21 years old (Christina was about 16 years old). Christina Jones b. about 1845 in Orange; d. after 1920.

Issue of Isom Stroud and Christina Jones:

139   i. son 7William Henry Stroud b. on 19 Oct. 1864 in Orange.
140   ii. dau. Martha Maybelle Stroud b. on 1 Dec. 1867 in Orange.
      iii. dau. Mary Catherine Stroud b. on 14 Oct. 1869 in Orange; m. Cadmus C. Funk (15 Oct. 1870 in Milltown, Crawford, Indiana–15 May 1941), son of Abraham Clark Funk (son of Rheuben Funk and Lucinda Spencer) and Lavina Briscoe, on 26 April 1890 in Crawford when 20 years old (Cadmus C. was 19 years old).
      iv. dau. Dora Stroud b. in 1871; m. Matt Seacat.
      v. dau. Etta Stroud b. in 1873; d. in 1873, an infant.
141   vi. dau. Ada F. Stroud b. on 26 Aug. 1876 in Orange.
      vii. dau. Elsie E. Stroud b. on 14 Aug. 1880 in Crawford; m. Albert Judd (14 Nov. 1883 in Floyd–), son of George F. Judd and Mary E. Hammond, on 22 Sep. 1926 in Crawford when 46 years old (Albert was 42 years old).
      viii. dau. Bertha Stroud b. on 1 Aug. 1883 in Milltown; m. Albert Totten (9 Jan. 1888 in Milltown–), son of William A. Totten and Selvesta Millin, on 12 Jan. 1910 in Crawford when 26 years old (Albert was 22 years old).

Notes on Isom Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3418@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Union Chapel Cemetery, North Of Milltown [81585]

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 14, Line 96
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [81592]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [81593]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [81594]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): NA Film T9-0270, Page 278A
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Isom, Self, M, M, W, 40, Indiana Christena, Wife,F, M, W, 37, Indiana William H., Son, M, S, W, 17, Indiana Martha M., Dau, F, S, W, 14, Indiana Mary C., Dau, F, S, W, 11, Indiana Etta E., Dau, F, S, W, 7, Indiana Adie F., Dau, F, S, W, 3, Indiana
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [81610]

Isom was born out of wedlock to Lucretia & Unknown. He was given the name Stroud by Isham and Sarah - Grandparents who raised him until Lucretia married William McKay.

Notes for the family of Isom Stroud and Christina Jones:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C-4-404Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceMarriageNote: Record C-4 404

Sources for Isom Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Isom Stroud and Christina Jones:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Christina Jones:

Census
Date: 1920
Place: , Crawford, Indiana
Note: census, Milltown, 13-36/9-31.


Issue of Ebenezer E. Morgan and 5Lucretia Stroud [19] (4John Stroud [10], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1])

58. 6Nathan N. Morgan, son of Ebenezer E. Morgan and 5Lucretia Stroud [19]. Born about 1820 in Crawford, Indiana.

Married Sarah C. Woodford on 17 May 1846 in Crawford when about 26 years old (Sarah C. was about 21 years old). Sarah C. Woodford b. about 1825 in Indiana.

Issue of Nathan N. Morgan and Sarah C. Woodford:

      i. dau. 7Sarah M. Morgan b. about 1848 in Crawford.
      ii. dau. Inez Morgan b. about 1850 in Crawford.
      iii. son Woodford Morgan b. in 1859 in Indiana.
      iv. dau. Lilly Morgan b. in 1862 in Indiana.

Notes on Nathan N. Morgan:

Census
Date: 1850
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Jennings Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Line 747
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Jennings Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0270, Page Number 289D
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Nathan MORGAN Self M Male W 65 IN Carpenter DE NC Sarah C. MORGAN Wife M Female W 55 IN Keeping House CT CT Woodford MORGAN Son Male W 21 IN Laborer IN IN Lilly MORGAN Dau Female W 18 IN At Home IN IN Julia GARDNER SisterL Female W 36 IN CT CT
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [82054]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [82055]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [82056]

Sources for Nathan N. Morgan:

Source 1
Title: 1850 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1850 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

59. 6Sarepta Morgan, dau. of Ebenezer E. Morgan and 5Lucretia Stroud [19]. Born on 21 Sep. 1821 in Indiana. Died on 20 Sep. 1906 in Jeffersonville, Clark, Indiana, 84 years old.

Married William Henry Fogg on 23 Nov. 1845 in Crawford when 24 years old. William Henry Fogg b. on 24 Jan. between 1816 and 1818 in (England), Manchester; d. on 31 Jan. 1900.

Issue of Sarepta Morgan and William Henry Fogg:

      i. son 7Clarence Fogg b. in 1848.
      ii. dau. Clara Fogg b. in 1848.
      iii. son Walter Fogg b. in 1851.
      iv. son Harry Morgan Fogg b. in 1855.
      v. son William Frank Fogg b. in 1858 in Indiana.
      vi. son Harry Fogg b. about 1860 in Indiana.
      vii. son Charles F. Fogg b. in 1867.

Notes on William Henry Fogg:

GEDCOM The place name “(England)” must begin with a letter, digit or ‘: 0 @I42534@ INDI ◊ 1 BIRT ◊ 2 PLAC (England), Manchester [680729]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: Jeffersonville, Clark, Indiana
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0269, Page Number 130B
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Wm. H. FOGG Self M Male W 63 ENG Banker ENG ENG Sarepta M. FOGG Wife M Female W 53 IN Keeping House DE NC Wm. F. FOGG Son S Male W 22 IN ENG IN Harry C. FOGG Son S Male W 20 IN Laborer ENG IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [680747]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [680748]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [680749]

Sources for William Henry Fogg:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

60. 6Catherine Morgan, dau. of Ebenezer E. Morgan and 5Lucretia Stroud [19]. Born in 1823 in Indiana.

Married Robert Kendall. Robert Kendall b. in 1821 in Indiana.

Issue of Catherine Morgan and Robert Kendall:

      i. dau. 7Catherine Kendall b. in 1856.
      ii. dau. Nancy Kendall b. in 1859 in Indiana.
      iii. dau. Rachel Kendall b. in 1861 in Indiana.
      iv. dau. Jemima Kendall b. in 1864 in Indiana.

Notes on Robert Kendall:

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Greenfield Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0302, Page Number 113B
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Robert KENDALL Self M Male W 59 IN Farmer IN IN Catherine KENDALL Wife M Female W 57 KY Keeping House KY KY Catherine KENDALL Dau S Female W 24 IN At Home IN KY Nancy KENDALL Dau S Female W 21 IN At Home IN KY Rachel KENDALL Dau S Female W 19 IN At Home IN KY Jemima KENDALL Dau S Female W 16 IN At Home IN KY
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [681425]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [681426]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [681427]

Sources for Robert Kendall:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of 5Abraham Stroud [20] (4John Stroud [10], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Susannah Goldman

61. 6Nancy Catherine Stroud, dau. of 5Abraham Stroud [20] and Susannah Goldman. Born on 8 June 1846 in Orange, Indiana. Died on 27 Oct. 1895 in Crawford, 49 years old.

Married Isaac Jones, son of Henry Jones and Margaret Crecelius (dau. of Jacob Crecelius and Christena _____), on 13 Oct. 1864 in Crawford when 18 years old (Isaac was 25 years old). Isaac Jones b. on 31 Aug. 1839 in Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township; d. on 3 Jan. 1916 in Milltown, Crawford, Indiana, 76 years old.

Issue of Nancy Catherine Stroud and Isaac Jones:

      i. son 7George Andrew S. Jones b. on 4 July 1863 in Crawford; d. on 28 May 1895, 31 years old; bur. in Crawford, Indiana, Union Chapel Cemetery.
      ii. dau. Margaret Elizabeth Jones b. on 7 May 1867 in Crawford; d. on 9 April 1956, 88 years old.
      iii. son John Thomas Jones b. on 18 May 1869 in Crawford.
142   iv. dau. Emma F. Jones b. on 13 Oct. 1870 in Crawford.
      v. son Isaac Willard Jones b. on 25 Oct. 1874 in Crawford; m. (1) Cora Judd (15 April 1887 in Milltown–), dau. of George F. Judd and Mary E. Hammond, on 26 Dec. 1907 in Crawford when 33 years old (Cora was 20 years old); m. (2) Lillie B. _____; divorced.
      vi. dau. Mettie May Jones b. on 12 June 1880 in Crawford.
143   vii. son Henry Wilbert Jones b. on 2 Dec. 1882 in Crawford.
144   viii. son James Ott Jones b. on 17 Jan. 1884 in Crawford.
      ix. son Arthur Aubrey Jones b. on 22 Jan. 1888 in Crawford.

Notes on Nancy Catherine Stroud:

13 Aug 1850 Crawford Co., IN, John BARNETT and Michael HARVEY put up Guardianship Bond for: John BARNETT appointed guardian of minor heirs of Jane STROUD, Decd., including Nancy A. STROUD, aged 12 years. Crawford Co., IN, Marriages, C-158-1.

In the marriage application of Willard Jones to Cora Judd, Willard stated that his Mother Nancy Stroud was born in Kentucky. Could this be a different Nancy Stroud than the one noted above?

Notes on Isaac Jones:

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 11, Line 75
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [82143]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [82144]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [82145]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0270, Page Number 278A
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Isaac JONES Self M Male W 39 IN Farmer IN IN Nancy C. JONES Wife M Female W 32 IN Keeping House IN KY George A. S. JONES Son S Male W 14 IN At Home IN IN Maggie JONES Dau S Female W 13 IN At Home IN IN John L. JONES Son S Male W 11 IN At Home IN IN Emma L. JONES Dau S Female W 9 IN At Home IN IN Isaac W. JONES Son S Male W 5 IN At Home IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [82168]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [82169]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [82170]

Notes for the family of Isaac Jones and Nancy Catherine Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C page 1G.Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by Annuel Stroud,

Sources for Isaac Jones:

Source 1
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Isaac Jones and Nancy Catherine Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of 5Wesley Stroud [21] (4John Stroud [10], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Winna _____

62. 6George W. Stroud, son of 5Wesley Stroud [21] and Winna _____. Born on 30 June 1844 in Crawford, Indiana. Died on 15 April 1929 in Marengo, Crawford, Indiana, USA, 84 years old. Buried in Orange, Indiana, Rock Springs Cemetery.

Married Sarah Holaday, dau. of Benjamin N. Holaday and Cynthia _____, on 7 Oct. 1866 in Orange when 22 years old (Sarah was 18 years old). Sarah Holaday b. on 26 Jan. 1848 in Indiana; d. on 23 Sep. 1913 in Orange, 65 years old; bur. in Orange.

Issue of George W. Stroud and Sarah Holaday:

      i. dau. 7Cynthia Stroud b. on 13 Aug. 1867 in Crawford; m. Laban L. Mcdonald (1872–1926 bur. in Orange, Indiana, Bluff Springs Cemetery), son of Homer Mcdonald, on 5 Nov. 1898 in Orange when 31 years old (Laban L. was 25 or 26 years old).
      ii. son Benjamin M. Stroud b. on 1 June 1871 in Crawford; d. on 21 Nov. 1932 in Indiana, 61 years old; bur. in Orange; m. Zada Ann Line (4 Oct. 1884 in Orange–1959), dau. of Solomon W. Line and Catherine “Kate” Mcdonald (dau. of James Mcdonald and Mary Mourning Bobbitt), on 22 Feb. 1908 in Orange when 36 years old (Zada Ann was 23 years old).

Notes on George W. Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3438@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Orange, Indiana, Rock Springs Cemetery, Southeast Township, Section 11, T1s R1e [82248]

Burial
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): STROUD, George W.
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Event: - Union Army, Company A, 49th Infantry Regiment Indiana
Type: Military Service
Date: 21 NOV 1861-07 MAR 1863
Place: War (1861-1865) (Civil)
See source 2 for this person
Extracted text: George W. Stroud Residence: Occupation: Service Record: Enlisted as a Musician on 21 November 1861. Enlisted in Company A, 49th Infantry Regiment Indiana on 21 November 1861. Discharged on 07 March 1863. Sources: Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Indiana.

Event: - Union Army, Company F, 59th Infantry Regiment Indiana
Type: Military Service
Date: 14 MAR 1864-17 JUL 1865
Place: War (1861-1865) (Civil)
See source 3 for this person
Extracted text: George Stroud Claimed Residence in Valeen Enlist Date Enlist Place Enlist Rank Enlist Age 14 March 1864 Priv Served Indiana Enlisted F Co. 59th Inf Reg. IN Mustered Out at Louisville, KY on 17 July 1865

Event
Type: Pension Roll
See source 4 for this person
Page(s): George W. Stroud, Cert # 175 705
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Applied for and awarded pension for service durimg the Civil War.
Media format: jpg
Media file: George W. Stroud.jpg
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [82298]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [82299]

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township
See source 5 for this person
Page(s): Page 1, Line 7
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [82306]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [82307]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [82308]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township
See source 6 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0302, Page Number 99A
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: George W. STROUD Self M Male W 35 IN Farming IN TN Sarah STROUD Wife M Female W 31 IN House Keeping NC IN Syntha STROUD Dau S Female W 12 IN Asst. House K. IN IN Benjamin M. STROUD Son S Male W 9 IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [82325]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [82326]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [82327]

Notes for the family of George W. Stroud and Sarah Holaday:

MarriageNote: Record C-5 294

Sources for George W. Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Rock Springs Cemetery, Southeast Township Section 11, T1S R1E
Extracted Text: Rock Springs Primitive Baptist Church and cemetery are located in Southeast Township (Sec. 11, T.1S,R1E). This is approximately 1 1/2 miles east of Valeene, Indiana. The church was constituted in 1826 in Stampers Creek Township at the home of Charles Vandeveer. A house for worship was built in 1841 at the described location at a cost of $500. First members of the church were: John, Joel, Aaron, Charles, and George Vandeveer with their wives; _____ Phillips and wife, Abraham Pierson and wife, Cole Pierson, Nancy Pierson, William Pierson, John Pierson, Abraham Noblitt, Woodson Noblitt, Amelia Noblitt, and William Noblitt. The first minister was Aaron Vandever and since him have been Charles Vandeveer, Jonathan Jones, William Robertson, T. N. Robertson, and Samuel McMahan(this up to about 1880). Elder T. N. Robertson held an interesting revival in 1876, and succeeded in gaining about a dozen converts to the church. The cemetery has several old and unmarked graves. Nearly all those buried here are inter-related. Most of the inscriptions here were copied by unknown parties in 1946. Some updating has occurred, however, more needs to be done to bring it up to the current date (1996).
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Rock Springs Cemetery, Southeast Township Section 11, T1S R1E
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 49th Infantry Reg’t, Indiana
Extracted Text:
Regimental History Forty-ninth Infantry INDIANA (3-YEARS)

Forty-ninth Infantry. Cols.,John W. Ray, James Keigwin; Lieut.Cols., Joseph H. Thornton, Arthur J. Hawhe, Tames Leeper, James A. Gardner; Majs., Joseph H. Thornton, Arthur J. Hawhe, James Leeper, John R. Hamacher.

This regiment was organized at Jeffersonville and was mustered in Nov. 21, 1861. It left the state Dec. 11 for Bardstown, Ky., and left there Jan. 12, 1862, for Cumberland Ford, where it remained until June, suffering greatly at the latter place from disease.

It was in skirmishes at Big Tree Gap and Cumberland Gap in March; accompanied Gen. Morgan’s forces to Cumberland Gap in June, and occupied the place on the 18th, the enemy retiring the same day. It remained there until September, when it joined in the retreat to the Ohio river, reaching Greenupsburg, Ky., early in October.

It proceeded to Coal Mouth, W. Va., and in November was ordered to Memphis joining Sherman’s army on the expedition to Vicksburg. It was in the battle at Chickasaw Bluffs, losing 56 in killed and wounded, and was in the expedition against Arkansas Post.

It assisted in digging a canal across Young’s point, and then moved for the rear of Vicksburg, participating in the battles of Port Gibson, Champion’s Hill and Black River bridge. It was then engaged in the siege of Vicksburg until its fall, including the assault of May 22.

It took part in the seven days’ siege of Jackson in July, and was ordered to New Orleans in August being assigned to the Department of the Gulf. It moved to Berwick’s Bay, took part in the Teche expedition, going as far as Opelousas, and on its return to New Orleans was ordered to Texas, reaching Matagorda Peninsula, Dec. 14.

It moved to Indianola, where on Feb. 3, 1864 171 reenlisted. It embarked at Matagorda Island April 19, for Alexandria, La., where it reinforced Banks’ army and was in continuous skirmishes until May 13, when the army retreated to the Mississippi.
It returned to New Orleans, was furloughed home in July, was ordered to Lexington, Ky., at the expiration of its furlough, and remained there until Sept. 7. It then proceeded to Louisville, where it was mustered out Sept. 13, 1865, having marched 8,000 miles during its service.

Its original strength was 974; gain by recruits, 294; reenlistments, 177; total, 1,445. Loss by death, 238, desertion, 94; unaccounted for, 42.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 3

Battles Fought: Battle at Cumberland Gap Battle at Chickasaw Bayou, Mississippi on 28 December 1862 Battle at Port Gibson, Mississippi on 01 May 1863 Battle at Baker’s Creek, Mississippi on 16 May 1863 Battle at Champion Hills, Mississippi on 16 May 1863 Battle at Vicksburg, Mississippi on 19 May 1863 Battle at Vicksburg, Mississippi on 22 May 1863 Battle at Vicksburg, Mississippi on 23 June 1863 Battle at Jackson, Mississippi on 13 July 1863 Battle at Bayou Rapid, Louisiana on 05 May 1864
ABBR: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 49th Infantry Reg’t, Indiana
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 3
Title: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 59th Infantry Reg’t, Indiana
Extracted Text: Regimental History Fifty-ninth Infantry INDIANA (3-YEARS)

Fifty-ninth Infantry. -- Cols., Jesse I. Alexander, Jefferson K. Scott, Thomas A. McNaught; Lieut.-Cols., Jefferson K. Scott, Thomas A. McNaught, Edward J. McBride; Majs., Elijah Sabin, Thomas A. McNaught, Edward J. McBride, John E. Simpson.

This regiment was organized at Gosport in the fall and winter of 1861 and was mustered in Feb. 11 1862. It left the state Feb. 18, and proceeded to Commerce, Mo., being the first regiment to report to Gen. Pope for duty with the Army of the Mississippi.

It moved to Benton and thence to New Madrid, participating in the siege of that place and being one of the first regiments to enter the town and take possession of Fort Thompson. It then marched for Tiptonville and assisted in the capture of over 5,000 prisoners.

It embarked for Fort Pillow April 12, returning on the 17th, and then proceeded to Hamburg, Tenn. Gen. Buford was assigned to the command of the brigade to which the 59th was attached.

The regiment was engaged from April 24 to May 29 in the movements connected with the march to and siege of Corinth, and then joined in the pursuit of the enemy to Booneville, Miss. Returning to Clear Creek near Corinth June 13, it remained until Aug. 6 and then removed to Jacinto where it remained until Sept. 7.

It then moved to Rienzi where it was joined by 250 recruits from Indiana. It was engaged in the battle of Corinth in October and pursued Gen. Price to the Hatchie River, after which it moved successively to Grand Junction, Davis’ Mills, Moscow, Oxford, and Lumpkins’ Mill.

On Dec. 26, it started for Memphis as escort for the commissary train, then returned to LaFayette and back to Memphis, where it went into camp and remained until Mar. 1, 1863. I t then moved to Helena, Ark., and embarked Mar. 12 on the Yazoo River expedition.

It then took up the march for Vicksburg and reached Port Gibson just as the battle closed. With the 1st brigade, 7th division, 17th army corps, it was engaged at Forty Hills, Raymond and Champion’s Hill. Its skirmishers were the first to enter Jackson and its flag the one to float over the capitol dome.

It formed the rear-guard for the 17th corps at the Big Black River and was the last regiment to cross and then destroy the bridges. It served in the trenches at Vicksburg, joining in the assault of May 22 with heavy losses, 126 being killed or wounded. It marched into Vicksburg July 4 and remained there until Aug. 5, when it moved for Helena.

On Sept. 28 it reembarked for Memphis and then moved to Glendale, where it remained until Oct. 17. It marched for Chattanooga, took part at Missionary Ridge, and went into camp at Bridgeport, Ala., where it was transferred to the 3rd division of the 15th army corps. It was in camp at Huntsville from Dec. 26, 1863, until Mar. 3, 1864, when it proceeded to Indiana on furlough having reenlisted as a veteran organization on Jan. 1.

It returned to Huntsville Apr. 3 and remained there until June 22, when it left to join Sherman’s army. It reached Kingston, GA, July 1, and guarded the bridge over the Etowah River until Aug. 26. It was then ordered to Chattanooga and marched from there in pursuit of Wheeler’s cavalry.

It moved to Tullahoma Sept. 1, returning on the 21st, and escorted a wagon train as far as Cartersville, Ga. It was again at the Etowah River from Sept. 28 to Nov. 12, when it proceeded to Atlanta and accompanied the army to Savannah.

It marched through the Carolinas to Raleigh, thence to Washington City, where it participated in the grand review; was then transferred to Louisville and mustered out July 17, 1865. During its term of service the regiment traveled 3,756 miles by rail, 4,618 miles by water, and 5,305 miles on foot.

The original strength was 721; gain by recruits, 1,195; reenlistments, 240; total, 2,156. Loss by death, 221; desertion, 32; unaccounted for, 158.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 3

Battles Fought:

Battle at Tullahoma, Tennessee Battle on 29 May 1862 Battle at Iuka, Mississippi on 19 September 1862 Battle at Champion Hills, Mississippi on 16 May 1863 Battle at Vicksburg, Mississippi on 22 May 1863 Battle at Vicksburg, Mississippi on 27 May 1863 Battle on 03 March 1865 Battle at Darlington, South Carolina on 03 March 1865
ABBR: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 59th Infantry Reg’t, Indiana
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 4
Title: Pension records
ABBR: Pension records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 5
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 6
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Sarah Holaday:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3443@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Orange, Indiana, Rock Springs Cemetery, Southeast Township, Section 11, T1s R1e [82403]

Burial
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): STROUD, Sarah
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Sources for Sarah Holaday:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Rock Springs Cemetery, Southeast Township Section 11, T1S R1E
Extracted Text: Rock Springs Primitive Baptist Church and cemetery are located in Southeast Township (Sec. 11, T.1S,R1E). This is approximately 1 1/2 miles east of Valeene, Indiana. The church was constituted in 1826 in Stampers Creek Township at the home of Charles Vandeveer. A house for worship was built in 1841 at the described location at a cost of $500. First members of the church were: John, Joel, Aaron, Charles, and George Vandeveer with their wives; _____ Phillips and wife, Abraham Pierson and wife, Cole Pierson, Nancy Pierson, William Pierson, John Pierson, Abraham Noblitt, Woodson Noblitt, Amelia Noblitt, and William Noblitt. The first minister was Aaron Vandever and since him have been Charles Vandeveer, Jonathan Jones, William Robertson, T. N. Robertson, and Samuel McMahan(this up to about 1880). Elder T. N. Robertson held an interesting revival in 1876, and succeeded in gaining about a dozen converts to the church. The cemetery has several old and unmarked graves. Nearly all those buried here are inter-related. Most of the inscriptions here were copied by unknown parties in 1946. Some updating has occurred, however, more needs to be done to bring it up to the current date (1996).
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Rock Springs Cemetery, Southeast Township Section 11, T1S R1E
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

63. 6Nancy Rebecca Stroud, dau. of 5Wesley Stroud [21] and Winna _____. Born about 1846 in Orange, Indiana.

Married 7Abraham Key [151], son of John Key (son of Williams Key and Unnamed _____) and 6Delana Stroud [73], on 17 Nov. 1869 in Crawford when about 23 years old (Abraham was 22 years old).

64. 6Mahala M. Stroud, dau. of 5Wesley Stroud [21] and Winna _____. Born about 1848 in Orange, Indiana.

Married John Moore on 25 Sep. 1865 in Crawford when about 17 years old. John Moore b. in Crawford.

Issue of Mahala M. Stroud and John Moore:

146   i. son 7Albert Moore b. on 10 Dec. 1883.

Notes on John Moore:

Notes for the family of John Moore and Mahala M. Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C page 208Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by Simon Monk, JP.

Sources for the family of John Moore and Mahala M. Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of 5Isaiah Stroud [22] (4John Stroud [10], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Alia Ann Highfill

65. 6Henry C. Stroud, son of 5Isaiah Stroud [22] and Alia Ann Highfill. Born about 1844 in Crawford, Indiana.

Married Rachel Eastridge, dau. of James Eastridge (son of Isaac Eastridge and Rebecca Haskins) and Catherine Enlow, on 5 April 1866 in Crawford when about 22 years old (Rachel was 19 years old). Rachel Eastridge b. on 28 Dec. 1846 in Crawford; d. on 30 Sep. 1903 in Perry, 56 years old; bur. in Perry, Indiana, Doolittles Mills Cemetery.

Issue of Henry C. Stroud and Rachel Eastridge:

      i. dau. 7Mary F. Stroud b. in 1869 in Indiana.
147   ii. son Joseph F. Stroud b. on 4 Nov. 1874 in Perry.
      iii. son Samuel E. Stroud b. about 1877 in Indiana.
      iv. dau. Ida May Stroud b. in 1885 in Indiana; m. James E. Johnson (1880–) on 17 Feb. 1904 in Crawford when 18 or 19 years old (James E. was 23 or 24 years old).
      v. son Francis Stroud b. on 14 Jan. 1888; d. on 11 April 1951, 63 years old; bur. in Perry.
      vi. son Mack P. Stroud b. on 19 Dec. 1888/9; bur. in Perry; m. Elizabeth _____ (31 July 1904–13 April 1925 bur. in Perry).

Notes on Henry C. Stroud:

Event: - Union Army, Co. I, 53rd Indiana Infantry
Type: Military Service
Place: War (1861-1865) (Civil)
See source 1 for this person
Extracted text: Henry Stroud (First_Last) Regiment Name 53 Indiana Infantry Side Union Company I Soldier’s Rank_In Pvt Soldier’s Rank_Out Pvt Alternate Name Notes Film Number M540 roll 75
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [82473]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [82474]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [82475]

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Patoka Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): Page 17 Line 122
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [82482]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [82483]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [82484]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Perry, Indiana, Oil Township
See source 3 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0304, Page Number 11B
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Henry STROUD Self M Male W 36 IN Farmer NC IN Rachel STROUD Wife M Female W 34 IN Keepinghouse IN IN Mary K. STROUD Dau S Female W 9 IN IN IN James F. STROUD Son S Male W 6 IN IN IN Samuel E. STROUD Son S Male W 3 IN IN IN Ida A. STROUD Dau S Female W 7M IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [82503]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [82504]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [82505]

Notes for the family of Henry C. Stroud and Rachel Eastridge:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C page 263Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by John Pace, JP.

Sources for Henry C. Stroud:

Source 1
Title: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 53rd Infantry Reg’t, Indiana
Extracted Text: Regimental History Fifty-third Infantry INDIANA (3-YEARS)

Fifty-third Infantry.--Cols., Walter Q. Gresham, William Jones Warner L. Vestal, Lieut.-Cols., Roger Martin William Jones, Warner L. Vestal, Henry Duncan, Majs., Roger Martin, Thomas McGrain, Jr. William S. Langford, Warner L. Vestal, Henry Duncan, Andrew H. Fabrique.

This regiment was organized at New Albany in Jan. and Feb. 1862, its organization being perfected by consolidation with the recruits raised at Rockport for the 62nd regiment then forming. It was mustered in Feb. 26, and moved to Indianapolis to guard prisoners.

It left the state on Mar. 15, for Louisville and thence to Savannah, Tenn., where it remained until Apr. 15. It moved to Corinth and was engaged in the siege, then moved to Lagrange, from which point it made expeditions in various directions. It proceeded to Memphis remaining there until September, when it moved to Bolivar, thence toward Corinth and was engaged in October at Hatchie bridge, where it crossed the burning bridge and charged the enemy’s lines.

It moved into north Mississippi, returning to Moscow, Tenn., and thence to Memphis where it remained until April, 1863. It proceeded with the 3rd brigade 4th division, 16th corps, to Young’s point, thence to Grand Gulf, and soon after joined in the siege of Vicksburg.

After the surrender it moved to Jackson, where the enemy was forced to evacuate, and the regiment was then located at Natchez until September. Col. Gresham was appointed brigadier-general on Aug. 11, and Lieut.-Col. Jones succeeded as regimental commander. The regiment was attached to the 17th corps and joined the expedition into Louisiana where it was engaged on several occasions.

It returned to Vicksburg where it remained until Feb. 1864, and then joined in the Meridian campaign. At Hebron Miss., 383 of the regiment reenlisted and were furloughed home in March. The regiment joined Sherman’s army at Acworth, GA, June 6, 1864, and participated in most of the battles and skirmishes of the Atlanta campaign, being engaged at Kennesaw Mountain, Nickajack Creek, Peachtree Creek, and in the engagement before Atlanta, July 22, where it suffered greatly, Col. Jones being among the killed.

After the fall of Atlanta it joined in the pursuit of Hood, then returned to Atlanta and took part in the advance on Savannah in November. It was in the campaign of the Carolinas, halting at Goldsboro, and after the surrender of Johnston’s army, went to Washington, D. C., thence to Louisville, and was there mustered out July 21, 1865.

The original strength was 916; gain by recruits, 1,194; reenlistments, 381; total, 2,491. Loss by death, 294; desertion, 100; unaccounted for, 127.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 3

Battles Fought

Fought on 05 October 1862 at Hatchie Bridge, TN. Fought on 17 June 1864 at Big Shanty, GA. Fought on 27 June 1864 at Kenesaw Mountain, GA. Fought on 20 July 1864 at Atlanta, GA. Fought on 21 July 1864 at Atlanta, GA. Fought on 22 July 1864 at Atlanta, GA. Fought on 09 August 1864 at Atlanta, GA. Fought on 13 August 1864 at Atlanta, GA.
ABBR: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 53rd Infantry Reg’t, Indiana
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 3
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Henry C. Stroud and Rachel Eastridge:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

66. 6Francis M. Stroud, son of 5Isaiah Stroud [22] and Alia Ann Highfill. Born on 9 Nov. 1845 in Crawford, Indiana. Died on 30 Jan. 1909, 63 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Highfill Chapel Cemetery.

Married Elizabeth Allstott, dau. of Anthony Allstott and Zerilda Allen (dau. of Eli Allen and Elizabeth Mcdonald), on 27 Nov. 1871 in Crawford when 26 years old (Elizabeth was 22 years old). Elizabeth Allstott b. on 5 April 1849 in Crawford; d. on 5 May 1935, 86 years old; m. (2) Hardin Hiram Enlow (15 June 1843 in Crawford–28 Sep. 1935) in 1912 when 62 or 63 years old (Hardin Hiram was 68 or 69 years old).

Issue of Francis M. Stroud and Elizabeth Allstott:

148   i. son 7Leroy Stroud b. on 23 Dec. 1878 in Indiana.
      ii. son A. Wayne Stroud b. on 30 Nov. 1889 in Crawford; m. Edith Ott, dau. of William H. Ott and Elizabeth McBURNEY, on 2 Oct. 1912 in Crawford when 22 years old.

Notes on Francis M. Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I43142@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Highfill Chapel Cemetery, Taswell [689970]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Patoka Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0271, Page Number 364C
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Francis M. STROUD Self M Male W 32 IN Farming IN IN Elizabeth N. STROUD Wife M Female W 31 IN Keeping House IN IN Leroy STROUD Son S Male W 1 IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [689984]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [689985]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [689986]

(Research):The 1850 census for Isiah and family does not show a Francis. This individual may be incorrectly linked!

Sources for Francis M. Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

67. 6Elijah J. Stroud, son of 5Isaiah Stroud [22] and Alia Ann Highfill. Born about 1848 in Crawford, Indiana. Died in 1886 in Crawford, about 38 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Highfill Chapel Cemetery.

Married first Rachel Ann Enlow, dau. of Franklin Enlow and Malinda Taylor, on 7 Jan. 1871 in Crawford when about 23 years old (Rachel Ann was 21 or 22 years old). Rachel Ann Enlow b. in 1849 in Indiana; d. in 1880, 30 or 31 years old; bur. in Crawford.

Issue of Elijah J. Stroud and Rachel Ann Enlow:

149   i. dau. 7Malinda Jane Stroud b. on 6 Nov. 1871 in Crawford.
150   ii. son Charles W. Stroud b. in 1872 in Indiana.
      iii. son Thomas Lee Stroud b. about 1876 in Crawford.
      iv. son J. Franklin Stroud b. on 22 Sep. 1877 in Crawford; d. on 22 March 1949, 71 years old; bur. in Crawford.
      v. son William Charles Stroud b. on 22 April 1881 in Leavenworth, Crawford, Indiana; m. Zora A. Smith (16 March 1886 in Crawford–) on 20 Sep. 1905 in Crawford when 24 years old (Zora A. was 19 years old).

Married second Nancy Catherine Enlow, dau. of Henry H. Enlow and Sarah Seaton, on 2 June 1880 in Crawford when about 32 years old (Nancy Catherine was about 31 years old). Nancy Catherine Enlow b. about 1849 in Mississippi; d. in 1937, about 88 years old; bur. in Crawford.

Issue of Elijah J. Stroud and Nancy Catherine Enlow:

      vi. son 7William Stroud .
      vii. son Jesse T. Stroud b. in 1884 in Crawford; d. in 1884, an infant; bur. in Crawford.

Notes on Elijah J. Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3448@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Highfill Chapel Cemetery, Taswell [82540]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township
Note: census, 6-24/1-7.
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film T9-0270, Page 282A
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Elijah J. STROUD Self M Male W 31 IN County Recorder IN IN Rachel A. STROUD Wife M Female W 31 IN Keeping House IN IN Charles W. STROUD Son S Male W 8 IN At School IN IN Malinda J. STROUD Dau S Female W 6 IN At Home IN IN Thomas Lee STROUD Son S Male W 4 IN At Home IN IN J. Franklin STROUD Son S Male W 3 IN At Home IN IN M. D. L. GIBBS Other S Male W 35 IN Attorney - Boarder IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [82564]

Notes for the family of Elijah J. Stroud and Nancy Catherine Enlow:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book E Page 78Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Sources for Elijah J. Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Elijah J. Stroud and Nancy Catherine Enlow:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Rachel Ann Enlow:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I59056@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Highfill Chapel Cemetery, Taswell [903960]

Notes on Nancy Catherine Enlow:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3454@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Highfill Chapel Cemetery, Taswell [82671]

68. 6Mary G. Stroud, dau. of 5Isaiah Stroud [22] and Alia Ann Highfill. Born in 1851 in Crawford, Indiana. Died in 1928, 76 or 77 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Taswell Cemetery.

Married Doctor Newton Wilbur King on 20 Aug. 1872 in Crawford when 20 or 21 years old (Doctor Newton Wilbur was 17 years old). Doctor Newton Wilbur King b. in Nov. 1854; d. in 1929 in Indiana, 74 or 75 years old; bur. in Crawford.

Issue of Mary G. Stroud and Doctor Newton Wilbur King:

      i. son 7Oliver E. King b. in 1873 in Indiana.
      ii. son Major Burr King b. on 10 April 1886 in Crawford; d. on 17 Aug. 1950, 64 years old; m. Clara Tucker (10 Aug. 1889 in Crawford–), dau. of Thoman Kinder Tucker and Malinda Catherine Eastridge, on 27 Feb. 1909 in Crawford when 22 years old (Clara was 19 years old).

Notes on Mary G. Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3449@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Taswell Cemetery, Taswell [82583]

Notes on Doctor Newton Wilbur King:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3455@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Taswell Cemetery, Taswell [82690]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: Leavenworth, Crawford, Indiana
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0270, Page Number 285C
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Newton W. KING Self M Male W 25 IN Fisherman KY KY Mary KING Wife M Female W 27 IN Keeping House IN IN Oliver E. KING Son S Male W 3 IN At Home IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [82705]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [82706]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [82707]

Notes for the family of Doctor Newton Wilbur King and Mary G. Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C page 619Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by Joel Walls, JP

Sources for Doctor Newton Wilbur King:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Doctor Newton Wilbur King and Mary G. Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

69. 6Elisha Stroud, son of 5Isaiah Stroud [22] and Alia Ann Highfill. Born in 1853 in Crawford, Indiana, Patoka Township. Died on 1 Oct. 1907 in Crawford, 53 or 54 years old.

Married Mary J. _____. Mary J. _____ b. on 6 March 1851 in Crawford, Indiana; d. on 17 April 1923 in Crawford, 72 years old.

Issue of Elisha Stroud and Mary J. _____:

      i. son 7Charles M. Stroud b. on 29 May 1872 in Crawford; d. on 11 Nov. 1873 in Crawford, a year old.
      ii. son Monroe H. Stroud b. on 26 Nov. 1879 in Crawford; d. on 12 Jan. 1895 in Crawford, 15 years old.
      iii. dau. Infant Stroud b. on 22 Oct. 1890 in Crawford; d. on 21 March 1891 in Crawford, four months old.
      iv. dau. Infant Stroud b. on 26 June 1892 in Crawford; d. on 26 June 1892 in Crawford, newborn.

70. 6Malinda Stroud, dau. of 5Isaiah Stroud [22] and Alia Ann Highfill. Born about 1856 in Crawford, Indiana.

Married John S. Walton Jr. on 21 Feb. 1878 in Orange when about 22 years old (John S. Jr. was 22 or 23 years old). John S. Walton Jr. b. in 1855 in Indiana.

Issue of Malinda Stroud and John S. Walton Jr.:

      i. dau. 7_____ Walton b. in 1880 in Indiana.
      ii. dau. _____ Walton b. on 14 Nov. 1889 in Orange.
      iii. dau. _____ Walton b. on 4 Oct. 1893 in Orange.
      iv. son Bennie Walton b. on 22 Jan. 1894 in Orange.
      v. dau. _____ Walton b. on 10 Feb. 1901 in Orange.

Notes on John S. Walton Jr.:

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0302, Page Number 94C
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: John S. WALTON Self M Male W 25 IN Farming IN IN Malinda J. WALTON Wife M Female W 22 IN House Keeping IN IN WALTON Dau S Female W 4M IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [82736]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [82737]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [82738]

Notes for the family of John S. Walton Jr. and Malinda Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C Page 6 Entry 543Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceMarriageNote: Record C-6 543

Sources for John S. Walton Jr.:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of John S. Walton Jr. and Malinda Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of 5Rial Stroud [23] (4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Netty Morgan

71. 6Malinda Stroud, dau. of 5Rial Stroud [23] and Netty Morgan. Born about 1824 in Indiana.

Married John R. Trotter on 19 April 1849 in Crawford when about 25 years old (John R. was about 35 years old). John R. Trotter b. about 1814 in Valeene, Orange, Indiana.

Issue of Malinda Stroud and John R. Trotter:

      i. son 7William F. Trotter b. in 1850 in Indiana.

Notes on John R. Trotter:

Census
Date: 1850
Place: , Washington, Indiana
Note: census, Posey Township, p. 229.

Notes for the family of John R. Trotter and Malinda Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book B page 84 record 1254Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by David Stewart

Sources for the family of John R. Trotter and Malinda Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

72. 6James Stroud, son of 5Rial Stroud [23] and Netty Morgan. Born about 1833 in Crawford, Indiana.

Married Nancy J. Crawford on 6 Jan. 1857 in Crawford when about 24 years old (Nancy J. was about 16 years old). Nancy J. Crawford b. about 1841 in Indiana.

Issue of James Stroud and Nancy J. Crawford:

      i. son 7William A. Stroud b. about 1858.

Notes on James Stroud:

Census
Date: 1850
Place: , Crawford, Indiana
Note: census, Liberty Township, Hsld. 466, p. 38.

Census
Date: 1860
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Jennings Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Line 34
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Stroud, James, age 25, born Indiana , Nancy J., age 18, born Indiana , William A., age 2, born Indiana

Notes for the family of James Stroud and Nancy J. Crawford:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book B page 290Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by John McNaughton

Sources for James Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1860 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1860 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of James Stroud and Nancy J. Crawford:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Nancy J. Crawford:

(Research):A Nancy Jane Crawford is listed in the 1850, Crawford County Ohio Township census as the daughter of Robert Crawford and Syntha. shown as age 10.


Issue of 5Abraham Stroud [24] (4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Nicey Adkins

73. 6Delana Stroud, dau. of 5Abraham Stroud [24] and Nicey Adkins. Born about 1827 in Crawford, Indiana.

Married John Key, son of Williams Key and Unnamed _____, on 21 May 1844 in Crawford when about 17 years old (John was 17 or 18 years old). John Key b. in 1826 in Tennessee; d. after 1859 in Indiana, at least 33 years old; m. (1) Elizabeth Miller Johnson (4 Jan. 1824 in Marengo, Crawford, Indiana, USA–10 Feb. 1844 in Crawford), dau. of William B. Johnson and Charlotte Pankey, on 19 April 1842 in Crawford when 15 or 16 years old (Elizabeth Miller was 18 years old); issue (surname Key): Martha Johnson (9 Feb. 1844 in Marengo–10 July 1887 in Marengo).

Issue of Delana Stroud and John Key:

      i. son 7Anderson Key b. about 1846.
151   ii. son Abraham Key b. in May 1847 in Indiana.
      iii. son Rial Key b. on 26 Dec. 1850 in Crawford; d. after 1930 in Crawford, at least 80 years old; bur. in Crawford; m. (1) Sibbie A. _____ (1844 in Indiana–) in 1876 when 25 or 26 years old (Sibbie A. was 31 or 32 years old); m. (2) Hannah Jane Lopp (5 Sep. 1858 in Harrison–1934) on 22 July 1914 in Crawford when 63 years old (Hannah Jane was 55 years old).
152   iv. son Simon E. Key b. on 18 Sep. 1859 in Orange.

Notes on Delana Stroud:

(Research):Craig Beeman Note: As of Sep 1994 I am speculating that “Lanny” was the daughter of Abraham.

Notes on John Key:

Census
Date: 1850
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Line 257
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Census
Date: 1860
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): Page 108, Line 765
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Information from the Johnson Family bible was sent in by Mary Alice Claycome Adney to the Hoosier Journal of Ancestry Volume VII Issue 1 page 55 and 56

Notes for the family of John Key and Delana Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book A page 337 record 930Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Sources for John Key:

Source 1
Title: 1850 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1850 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1860 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1860 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of John Key and Delana Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

74. 6Rial Stroud, son of 5Abraham Stroud [24] and Nicey Adkins. Born on 5 March 1828 in Crawford, Indiana. Died on 30 July 1902 in Crawford, 74 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Mathers Cemetery.

Married first Martha E. Neal, dau. of Jonathon Neal (son of Pvt. Archibald Neal (Neil) American Patriot, Army of the U and Margaret _____) and Sarah Tipton, on 28 Feb. 1851 in Crawford when 22 years old (Martha E. was 17 or 18 years old). Martha E. Neal b. in 1833 in Crawford; d. before 1870, at most 36 years old; bur. in Crawford, Indiana, Union Chapel Cemetery.

Issue of Rial Stroud and Martha E. Neal:

      i. son 7John R. Stroud b. on 16 Dec. 1851.
153   ii. son Joab Stroud b. on 13 Oct. 1857 in Crawford.
      iii. son Jacob Stroud b. about 1858; d. on 9 Dec. 1927, about 69 years old; bur. in Crawford.
154   iv. son William Riley Stroud b. on 12 Nov. 1861 in Milltown, Crawford, Indiana.
      v. son Issac C. Stroud b. on 13 June 1864 in Indiana.

Married second Martha Jane Dooley, dau. of John Dooley and Sarah Jane Denbo, on 22 March 1877 in Crawford when 49 years old (Martha Jane was 41 years old). Martha Jane Dooley b. on 27 March 1835 in Crawford; d. on 13 Aug. 1922 in Crawford, 87 years old; bur. in Crawford.

Issue of Rial Stroud and Martha Jane Dooley:

155   vi. son 7Herman Tilden Stroud b. on 4 July 1881 in Indiana.
      vii. son Thaddeus Lee Stroud b. on 26 Oct. 1882 in Orange; d. on 15 Jan. 1971 in English, Crawford, Indiana, 88 years old.
156   viii. dau. Pearl V. Stroud b. on 1 April 1893 in Crawford.

Notes on Rial Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I122@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Mathers Cemetery, English [9006]

Event
Type: Property
Date: 01 JUL 1857
Place: , Crawford, Indiana
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): 24365
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 05 JUL 1893 [9014]
Extracted text: RIAL STROUD Warrantee Name: Document #: 24365 Misc. Doc. Nr: --- Indian Allotment Nr: --- Tribe: --- US Reservations: --- Mineral Reservations: No Geographic Name: --- Metes/Bounds: No Survey Date: --- Issue Date: July 1, 1857 Cancelled: No Authority: April 24, 1820: SALE-CASH ENTRY (3 Stat. 566) Acres: 40 Land Office: JEFFERSONVILLE 1 NWSW 11/ 2-S 1-E No 2nd PM IN CRAWFORD

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): Page 13, Line 89
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Stroud, Rial, age 35, Indiana , Martha, age 32, Indiana , Joab, age 9, Indiana , William R., age 7 , Isaac C., age 5
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [9049]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [9050]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [9051]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township
See source 3 for this person
Page(s): NA Film T9-0270, Page 273C
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Rial, Self, M, M, W, 52, Indiana Martha J. Wife, F, M, W, 25, Indiana Joab, Son, M, S, W, 22, Indiana William R., Son, M, S, W, 18, Indiana Isaac, Son, M, S, W, 15, Indiana
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [9065]

Media link
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 2 _SCBK Y [9073]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 2 _PRIM Y [9074]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 2 _TYPE PHOTO [9075]

Notes for the family of Rial Stroud and Martha E. Neal:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book B page 126Assessment: 4Note: Married by Elisha Jones, MG

Notes for the family of Rial Stroud and Martha Jane Dooley:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book D page 238Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by Samuel McMahon.MarriageMedia format: JPGMedia file: Stroud - 0213.JPG

Sources for Rial Stroud:

Source 1
Title: Land Patent (US)
ABBR: Land Patent (US)
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 3
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Rial Stroud and Martha E. Neal:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Rial Stroud and Martha Jane Dooley:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Martha E. Neal:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I29328@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Union Chapel Cemetery, North Of Milltown [489254]

Notes on Martha Jane Dooley:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I2754@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Mathers Cemetery, English [66815]

Media link
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 2 _SCBK Y [66823]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 2 _PRIM Y [66824]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 2 _TYPE PHOTO [66825]

75. 6Allen Stroud, son of 5Abraham Stroud [24] and Nicey Adkins. Born about 1833 in Crawford, Indiana. Died before 1907.

Married Elizabeth Ann Toney on 23 Sep. 1849 in Crawford when about 16 years old (Elizabeth Ann was 18 or 19 years old). Elizabeth Ann Toney b. in 1830 in Kentucky; d. before 1907, at most 76 years old.

Issue of Allen Stroud and Elizabeth Ann Toney:

      i. dau. 7Lucinda C. Stroud b. about 1858 in Indiana.
      ii. dau. Sarah E. Stroud b. in 1861 in Crawford; m. (1) _____ Hardy (–2 April 1907); m. (2) William L. Patton (27 Nov. 1876 in Crawford–), son of John Patton and Mary N. Denbo, on 14 June 1907 in Crawford when 45 or 46 years old (William L. was 30 years old); m. (3) John W. Pope (22 Sep. 1858 in Charles, Illinois–) on 10 March 1910 in Charles when 48 or 49 years old (John W. was 51 years old); divorced; m. (4) George Franklin Crecelius (10 March 1856 in Crawford–24 Nov. 1941 in Crawford), son of William Crecelius (son of Jacob Crecelius and Christena _____) and Lodica ’Dicy’ ’Rosie’ Goldman, on 26 Oct. 1912 in Crawford when 50 or 51 years old (George Franklin was 56 years old).
157   iii. dau. Armina Jane Stroud b. about 1864 in Indiana.
158   iv. dau. Monzelle Stroud b. about 1866 in Indiana.
      v. dau. Lida E. Stroud b. about 1868 in Indiana.
159   vi. son John W. Stroud b. about 1873 in Indiana.

Notes on Allen Stroud:

Census
Date: 1850
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Line 419
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): Page 1, Line 4
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [83060]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [83061]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [83062]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township
See source 3 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0271, Page Number 373A
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Allen STROUD Self M Male W 49 IN Farmer NC NC Elizabeth A. STROUD Wife M Female W 49 IN Keeping House VA NC Sinda C. STROUD Dau S Female W 22 IN IN IN Sarah E. STROUD Dau S Female W 19 IN IN IN Armela Jane STROUD Dau S Female W 16 IN IN IN Montsel STROUD Dau S Female W 14 IN IN IN Lidda E. STROUD Dau S Female W 12 IN In IN IN John E. STROUD Son S Male W 7 IN IN IN Abraham STROUD Father W Male W 76 NC Laborer NC NC
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [83088]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [83089]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [83090]
See source 3 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0271, Page Number 373A
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Allen STROUD Self M Male W 49 IN Farmer NC NC Elizabeth A. STROUD Wife M Female W 49 IN Keeping House VA NC Sinda C. STROUD Dau S Female W 22 IN IN IN Sarah E. STROUD Dau S Female W 19 IN IN IN Armela Jane STROUD Dau S Female W 16 IN IN IN Montsel STROUD Dau S Female W 14 IN IN IN Lidda E. STROUD Dau S Female W 12 IN In IN IN John E. STROUD Son S Male W 7 IN IN IN Abraham STROUD Father W Male W 76 NC Laborer NC NC
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [83112]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [83113]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [83114]

Notes for the family of Allen Stroud and Elizabeth Ann Toney:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book B page 94 record 1282Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by Elisha Jones, MGSee source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book B Page 94-1282.Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceCensus: 1850Date: 1850Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty TownshipNote: page 70/36 line 419 list Allen Stroud age 17 born in Crawford County and wife Elizabeth age 20 born in Kentucky.

Sources for Allen Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1850 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1850 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 3
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Allen Stroud and Elizabeth Ann Toney:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

76. 6Lucretia Stroud, dau. of 5Abraham Stroud [24] and Nicey Adkins. Born about 1836 in Crawford, Indiana.

Married Hansford Brown on 16 Dec. 1850 in Crawford when about 14 years old (Hansford was about 23 years old). Hansford Brown b. about 1827 in Tennessee.

Issue of Lucretia Stroud and Hansford Brown:

      i. dau. 7Nancy J. Brown b. in 1856.
      ii. dau. Margaret Brown b. in 1858 in Indiana.
      iii. dau. Elizabeth Brown .
      iv. son Isaac Brown b. in 1865 in Indiana.

Notes on Hansford Brown:

Census
Date: 1860
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 103, Line 725
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Hansford Brown, age 34 born Tennessee Louisa, age 27, born Indiana Neva, age 7, born Indiana Nancy J. age 4, born Indiana Margaret age 1, born Indiana Was Neva a daughter from a previous marriage?

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): Page 7, Line 46
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: This census used as source to add children! Brown, Han, age 43, Indiana , Lucresia, age 35, Indiana , Elizabeth, age ?, Indiana , Nancy J., age 14, Indiana , Isaac, age 8, Indiana Key, William, age 3, Indiana , Louisa, age 11/12, Indiana , Susan, age 8, Indiana
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [83396]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [83397]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [83398]

Notes for the family of Hansford Brown and Lucretia Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book B page 121Assessment: 4Note: Married by Simon Monk, JP.

Sources for Hansford Brown:

Source 1
Title: 1860 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1860 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Hansford Brown and Lucretia Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

77. 6Simon Stroud, son of 5Abraham Stroud [24] and Nicey Adkins. Born on 15 June 1838 in Crawford, Indiana. Died on 8 March 1913 in Dale, Spencer, Indiana, 74 years old.

Married Elizabeth Ellis on 17 July 1860 in Crawford when 22 years old (Elizabeth was about 22 years old). Elizabeth Ellis b. about 1838 in Indiana.

Issue of Simon Stroud and Elizabeth Ellis:

      i. dau. 7Sarah Stroud b. about 1859 in Indiana.
      ii. son Isaac Stroud b. about 1861 in Indiana.
      iii. dau. Nancy Stroud .
      iv. dau. Lucinda Stroud b. about 1868 in Indiana.
      v. son Abraham G. Stroud b. about 1870 in Indiana.
      vi. son Urah Calvin Stroud b. about 1873 in Indiana; d. in Dale; m. Karherine Carrie Eggers (1 Jan. 1876 in Holland, Dubois, Indiana–), dau. of Herman Henry Eggers and Carrie Catherine Schmeltecox, on 25 June 1908 in Crawford when about 35 years old (Karherine Carrie was 32 years old).
      vii. son James W. Stroud b. about 1877 in Indiana.

Notes on Simon Stroud:

Census
Date: 1860
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 53, Line 380
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Event: - Union Army, Co “A” 81st Indiana Infantry
Type: Military Service
Place: War (1861-1865) (Civil)
Note:
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): Civil War pension Simon Stroud (application 440,903 certifi
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 4 CONC cate 232,943) [83160]
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 14 SEP 1886 [83162]
Note: On Feb. 13, 1882, Simon Stroud declared that he was age 43, a resident of Dale, Spencer Co. Indiana. He had enrolled Aug. 12, 1862 in Co. A 81 Ind. Inf. and was honroably discharged June 13, 1865. He was 5’ 7”, had a dark complexion, blue eyes, dark hair and his occupation when enrolled was farmer.Simon Stroud died March 8, 1913. His death certificate gave his date of birth as June 15, 1838, birthplace Indiana. His widow was Elizabeth Stroud.
Extracted text: Simon Stroud (First_Last) Regiment Name 81 Indiana Infantry Side Union Company A Soldier’s Rank_In Pvt Soldier’s Rank_Out Pvt Alternate Name Notes Film Number M540 roll 75 Filed Pension request # 440903 and was approved # 232943 for service in Co “A” 81st INInf. Elizabeth applied for a widows pension request # 1004786 and was approved # 759141

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township
See source 3 for this person
Page(s): Page 21 Line ?
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Spencer, Indiana
Note: census, Carter Township, 32-53/9-29.

Event
Type: Pension Roll
Place: Indiana
Note: Applied for and was awarded a pension for service during the Civil War.
See source 4 for this person
Page(s): Simon Stroud, Cert# 232.943
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Media format: jpg
Media file: Simon Stroud.jpg
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [83212]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [83213]

Notes for the family of Simon Stroud and Elizabeth Ellis:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book B Page 395-3Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Sources for Simon Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1860 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1860 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 81st Infantry Reg’t, Indiana
Extracted Text: Regimental History Eighty-first Infantry INDIANA (3-YEARS)

Eighty-first Infantry. -- Cols., William W. Caldwell Horatio Woodbury, Ranna S. Moore, Oliver P. Anderson, Lieut.-Cois., John Timberlake, Horatio Woodbury, Leonidas Stout, William C. Wheeler, Oliver P. Anderson, Edward G. Mathey, Majs., Horatio Woodbury, Leonidas Stout, William C. Richards, Edward G. Mathey, William D. Evritt.

This regiment was organized at New Albany and was mustered in Aug. 20, 1862. It left the state at once for Louisville, where it remained until Oct. 1, when it moved with Buell’s army in pursuit of Bragg and was in reserve at the battle of Perryville.

At Nashville it was assigned to the 3rd brigade, 1st division, and took part in the movement towards Murfreesboro. At the battle of Stone’s River, it was on the right wing in the terrible charge of Dec. 31, its brigade holding the ground until those on either flank fell back, compelling it to retire and take a new position. The 81st lost 4 killed, 44 wounded and 40 missing.

It remained at Murfreesboro until in June, when it moved forward and took part in the fight at Liberty Gap. It remained at Winchester until Aug. 17, when it marched for Stevenson Ala., and reached Chattanooga in time to engage in the battle of Chickamauga, losing 8 killed, 59 wounded and 22 missing.

It was then at Chattanooga until Oct. 25, when it marched for Bridgeport, Ala., where it remained until Jan. 26, 1864. It went into camp at Ooltewah, Tenn., until May 3, and then joined Sherman’s army.

It fought at Tunnel Hill, Buzzard Roost gap, Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca, Dallas, Bald knob, Kingston, Kennesaw Mountain, Chattahoochee River, Peachtree Creek, about Atlanta, Jonesboro and Lovejoy’s Station.

It joined the pursuit of Hood at Gaylesville Ala. and proceeded thence to Chattanooga. On Oct. 31 it was detailed as train guard as far as Pulaski, marched thence to Franklin and participated in the battle at that point Nov. 30.

It then marched to Nashville, took a prominent part in the battle there in December, and then pursued the enemy to Huntsville, Ala. It was ordered to Strawberry plains in eastern Tennessee, and on April 3, 1865, moved into North Carolina but returned and proceeded to Nashville, which place was reached April 22.

It was mustered out June 13, 1865, when the recruits were transferred to the 31st Ind., with which they remained until its muster out.

The original strength of the 81st was 939; gain by recruits, 43; total, 982. Loss by death, 236, desertion, 33, unaccounted for, 8.

Source: Union Army, vol. 3, p. 161

Battles Fought:

Battle at Stones River, Tennessee on 31 December 1862 Battle at Murfreesboro, Tennessee on 04 June 1863 Battle at Lookout Mountain, Tennessee on 08 September 1863 Battle at Chickamauga, Georgia on 19 September 1863 Battle at Chickamauga, Georgia on 20 September 1863 Battle at Pine Mountain, Georgia on 15 June 1864 Battle at Kenesaw Mountain, Georgia on 20 June 1864 Battle at Kenesaw Mountain, Georgia on 21 June 1864 Battle at Kenesaw Mountain, Georgia on 22 June 1864 Battle at Kenesaw Mountain, Georgia on 23 June 1864 Battle at Kenesaw Mountain, Georgia on 26 June 1864 Battle at Marietta, Georgia on 04 July 1864 Battle at Atlanta, Georgia on 26 August 1864 Battle at Lovejoy Station, Georgia on 03 September 1864 Battle at Nashville, Tennessee on 15 December 1864.
ABBR: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 81st Infantry Reg’t, Indiana
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 3
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 4
Title: Pension records
ABBR: Pension records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Simon Stroud and Elizabeth Ellis:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Elizabeth Ellis:

Event
Type: Pension Roll
Date: 29 MAR 1913
Place: Indiana
Note: Applied for and was awarded widows pension for Simon’s service during the Civil War.
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Elizabeth Stroud, Cert# 759.141
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Media format: jpg
Media file: Simon Stroud.jpg
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [83451]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [83452]

Is this the Elizabeth STROUD appearing in the 1900 Crawford Co., Sterling TWP, 12-32/11-1. If so she has a grandson Claude STROUD b. Feb 1886 IN.

Elizabeth applied for a widows pension request # 1004786 and was approved # 759141 dated

On the marriage application of Urah, Elizabeth is listed with the last name “Ellis”.

On Jan. 3, 1917, Carrie Ordner of Birdseye, Dubois Co. Indiana filed a claimfor reimbursement. She was the daughter of Elizabeth Stroud, who died Nov.28, 1916. Kate Stroud and Urah Stroud, both of Dale, Indiana, signed aswitnesses.

Sources for Elizabeth Ellis:

Source 1
Title: Pension records
ABBR: Pension records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of 5William Stroud [25] (4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Nancy Jarrold

78. 6John Stroud, son of 5William Stroud [25] and Nancy Jarrold. Born about 1832 in Clay City, Clay, Indiana, USA. Died on 18 April 1866, about 34 years old.

Married Louisa Ott on 17 Feb. 1852 in Harrison, Indiana when about 20 years old (Louisa was about 22 years old). Divorced. Louisa Ott b. about 1830 in Indiana.

Issue of John Stroud and Louisa Ott:

      i. son 7Hezekiah Stroud b. on 26 March 1855 in Harrison; m. Nellie Ann Carter (in Harrison–) on 12 Jan. 1875 in Harrison when 19 years old.

Notes on John Stroud:

Death
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Hezekiah Stroud, minor, Alex Floyd, guardian (application 1
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 4 CONC 67,597) [83508]
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 14 SEP 1886 [83510]
Note: In a note from the War Dept., John Stroud had enrolled Feb. 8, 1864 at Indianapolis Indiana. There was no evidence of discharge.In the guardian’s appliation for pension, it was stated that Hezekiah Stroud was born Mar. 26, 1855. His mother, Louisa Stroud, was divorced Sept. 28, 1864. Hezekiah had been living with his mother in Morgan Township, Harrison Co. Ind.There was a marriage record of John Stroud to Louisa Ott on Feb. 17, 1852.The pension office sent a letter requesting official evidence of theenrollment, muster, service and cause of death of John Stroud, reported diedApril 18, 1866 at home, discharged Sept. 5, 1865.John Stroud’s service was in Co. C, 13 Ind. Inf.

Is this the John STROUD who appears in the 1860 Orange Co., IN census, Southeast TWP, p. 573, along with wife Louisa (b. abt 1830) and their son Hezekiah (b. abt 1854).

Notes for the family of John Stroud and Louisa Ott:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book B page 329Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceCensus: 1860Date: 1860Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast TownshipNote: 0312-0312 Stroud, John 30 M W Farmer $50 IN Stroud, Louisa 30 F W IN Stroud, Hezekiah 6 M W IN

Sources for John Stroud:

Source 1
Title: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 13th Infantry Reg’t, Indiana
Extracted Text: Regimental History Thirteenth Infantry INDIANA (3 years)

Thirteenth Infantry. Cols., Jeremiah C. Sullivan, Robert G. Foster, Cyrus J. Dobbs, John H. Lawrence; Lieut.-Cols., Will Cumback, Horace Heffren, Robert S. Foster, Cyrus J. Dobbs, John M. Wilson, Samuel M. Zent, Majs., Robert S. Foster, Cyrus J. Dobbs, John M. Wilson, John C. Burton John H. Lawrence, Richard J. Graham.

This regiment was originally accepted for state service for one year and was organized at Indianapolis for the U. S. service by volunteers from the companies in camp. It was one of the first four regiments volunteering from the state for three years and was mustered in June 19, 1861.

It left the state July 4, and joined Gen. McClellan’s forces at Rich Mountain, W. Va., July 10 participating in the battle at that place the following day. It was in numerous skirmishes about Cheat Mountain in September, supported a battery at Green Brier in October and was in the battle of Camp Alleghany in December.

It then moved to Green Spring Run, where it remained until March, when it took part in the battle of Winchester Heights, and joined in pursuit of Jackson’s army as far as New Market. Col. Sullivan was appointed brigadier-general on May 2 and Lieut.-Col. Foster was made colonel.

The regiment was in the engagement at Summerville, and then moved in pursuit of the enemy to Luray and Alexandria. It embarked on June 28 for Harrison’s landing, where it remained from July 2 to Aug. 15, when it marched for Fortress Monroe. From there it moved to Suffolk, and engaged in reconnaissances during the fall and winter. It was in the engagement at Deserted House, and aided in the defeat of Longstreet, in his attempt to sieze Suffolk in the spring of 1863.

Col. Foster was appointed brigadier-general on June 16, and Lieut.-Col. Cyrus J. Dobbs was promoted to colonel. On June 27, the regiment joined the expedition north of Richmond and sailed for Folly island, Charleston Harbor, July 28. It
participated in the siege operations of Forts Wagner and Gregg, being the first regiment to enter Fort Wagner in the assault of Sept. 7.

Part of the regiment reenlisted as veterans in December and were furloughed home. The regiment moved to Jacksonville, Fla., in Feb., 1864, remaining there until April 17, when it was transferred to Gloucester Point, Va., and assigned to the 2nd brigade, 3rd division, 10th corps.

It participated in most of the operations of Gen. Butler’s army south of Richmond, was engaged at Port Walthal Junction, Chester Station, and in the charge on the enemy’s rifle pits, losing nearly 200 men in these engagements. It was attached to the 3rd brigade, 3rd division, 18th corps on May 26, and joined the Army of the Potomac at Cold Harbor June 1.

After the battle of Cold Harbor it participated in the early assaults on the works at Petersburg. The non-veterans left for Indianapolis on June 19, and were mustered out on the 24th. The regiment engaged in the charge at the Crater, July 30, and was in the trenches before Petersburg until September.

It was in the battles of Strawberry Plains, at Chaffin’s Bluff and Fort Gilmer and in the attack on Richmond in October. It was sent to New York during the election in November, and joined the first expedition to Fort Fisher in December, returning to Chaffin’s Bluff on the 31st.

The veterans and recruits were reorganized into a battalion of five companies on Dec. 6 and five companies of drafted men were added later, making a full regiment. It participated in the assault on Fort Fisher in Jan. 1865 in the capture of Fort Anderson and the occupation of Wilmington, and was stationed at Raleigh, until July 20, when it was assigned to duty at Goldsboro, where it remained until mustered out, Sept. 5, 1865.

The original strength of the regiment was 1,047. Gain by recruits, 192; reenlistments, 148; unassigned recruits, 40, total, 1,427. Loss by death 136; desertion, 103; unaccounted for 25. At its reorganization, the original strength was 980. Gain by recruits, 166; total 1,146. Loss by death, 98; desertion, 1; unaccounted for 30.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 3

Battles Fought:

Battle at Bermuda Hundred, Virginia Battle at Bolton Church, Virginia Battle at Hampton, Virginia Battle at Rich Mountain, West Virginia on 11 July 1861 Battle at Cheat Mountain, West Virginia on 15 September 1861 Battle at Green Briar River, West Virginia on 03 October 1861 Battle at Allegheny, West Virginia on 13 December 1861 Battle at Winchester, Virginia on 23 March 1862 Battle on 03 May 1862 Battle on 03 October 1862 Battle at Blackwater, Virginia on 12 December 1862 Battle at Chester Station, Virginia on 10 May 1864 Battle at Foster’s Farm, Virginia on 19 May 1864 Battle at Foster’s Farm, Virginia on 20 May 1864 Battle at Weir Bottom Church, Virginia on 20 May 1864 Battle at Cold Harbor, Virginia on 01 June 1864 Battle at Petersburg, Virginia on 29 June 1864 Battle at Petersburg, Virginia on 30 June 1864 Battle at Petersburg, Virginia on 01 July 1864 Battle at Petersburg, Virginia on 06 July 1864 Battle at Petersburg, Virginia on 30 July 1864 Battle at Deep Bottom, Virginia on 16 August 1864 Battle at Petersburg, Virginia on 15 September 1864 Battle at Fort Fisher, North Carolina on 15 January 1865 Battle at Fort Fisher, North Carolina on 16 January 1865 Battle at Sugar Loaf Hill, North Carolina on 11 February 1865 Battle at Kinston, North Carolina on 15 April 1865
ABBR: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 13th Infantry Reg’t, Indiana
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of John Stroud and Louisa Ott:

Source 1
Title: Indiana, County of Harrison, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Harrison, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

79. 6James Watson (Wilson) Stroud, son of 5William Stroud [25] and Nancy Jarrold. Born in June 1833 in Clay City, Clay, Indiana, USA. Died on 24 July 1894 in Effingham, Illinois, 61 years old. Buried in Effingham, Illinois, Watson Cemetery.

Married first Malinda Ward on 16 Oct. 1854 in Clay, Indiana when 21 years old.

Married second Emma Ann Williams on 6 Oct. 1859 in Owen when 26 years old (Emma Ann was 24 or 25 years old). Emma Ann Williams b. in 1834 in Kentucky; d. on 17 Jan. 1889 in Watson, Effingham, Illinois, 54 or 55 years old; bur. in Effingham.

Issue of James Watson (Wilson) Stroud and Emma Ann Williams:

160   i. son 7John William Stroud b. in July 1860 in Clay City.
161   ii. dau. Nancy Isabelle Stroud b. on 5 April 1863 in Clay City.
162   iii. son Alexander Stroud b. in April 1865 in Indiana.

Notes on James Watson (Wilson) Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3492@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Effingham, Illinois, Watson Cemetery, Watson [83546]

Notes on Emma Ann Williams:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3497@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Effingham, Illinois, Watson Cemetery, Watson [83692]

80. 6Annel Stroud, son of 5William Stroud [25] and Nancy Jarrold. Born on 18 Oct. 1835 in Clay City, Clay, Indiana, USA. Died on 6 Nov. 1901 in Vernon, Missouri, Virgil Township, 66 years old. Buried in Vernon, Missouri, Sandstone Cemetery.

Married first Martha A. Huffstutter, dau. of George Huffstutter and Sarah Fouts. Martha A. Huffstutter b. on 21 Dec. 1836 in Harrison, Indiana; d. on 12 Dec. 1891 in Vernon, 54 years old.

Issue of Annel Stroud and Martha A. Huffstutter:

163   i. son 7Walter Stroud b. on 4 March 1861/2 in Harrison.

Married second Elizabeth Moon on 18 Feb. 1893 in Vernon when 57 years old (Elizabeth was 28 years old). Elizabeth Moon b. on 9 Sep. 1864 in Missouri; d. on 22 Nov. 1904, 40 years old.

Issue of Annel Stroud and Elizabeth Moon:

164   ii. dau. 7Katie May Stroud b. on 5 April 1894 in Vernon.
165   iii. son Annel Stroud b. on 5 April 1894 in Vernon.
      iv. dau. Lottie Jane Stroud b. on 14 Dec. 1897 in Vernon.

Notes on Annel Stroud:

Event: - Union Army, Company G, 13th Infantry Regiment Indiana
Type: Military Service
Date: From 19 JUN 1861 to 05 SEP 1865
Place: War (1861-1865) (Civil)
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Civil War pension Annel Stroud (application 404,384 certifi
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 4 CONC cate 530,316) [83573]
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 14 SEP 1886 [83575]
Note: widow’s pension Elizabeth Stroud (application 752,785)minor’s pension, H.M. Spears, guardian (application 772,117 certificate 563,450)Annel Stroud served in Co. B and D, 13 Ind. Inf. He enlisted June 19, 1861 and was discharged Sept. 15, 1865.On Sept. 29, 1883 Annel Stroud made an affidavit. He was age 51, of Sandstone, Vernon Co. MO.In an 1898 declaration, he said he married Sary Elizabeth Moon Feb. 18, 1893. Children were:Kate May born Apr. 5, 1894Annel born April 4, 1894 (maybe I copied that wrong???)Lottie Jane born Dec. 14, 1897Annel died Nov. 6, 1901. In her pension application, Elizabeth Stroud said her former husband died May 28, 1891 and Annel’s former wife also died in 1891. I didn’t see names for either of the former spouses. Her claim was disallowed because her marriage to the soldier was after passage of the Act of June 27, 1890.
Extracted text: Annel Stroud Claimed Residence in Washington County Enlist Date Enlist Place Enlist Rank Enlist Age 19 June 1861 Priv Served Indiana Enlisted G Co. 13th Inf Reg. IN Mustered Out at Goldsboro, NC on 05 September 1865.. Transferred on 06 December 1864 from Company G to Company B. Transferred from Company B to Company D.

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Harrison, Indiana
Note: Blue River Township, p 7.

Census
Date: 1850
Place: , Crawford, Indiana
Note: Whiskey Run Township, p 41.

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Effingham, Illinois, Jackson Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0205, Page Number 400B
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: A. STROUD Self M Male W 44 IN Farmer IN IN Martha STROUD Wife M Female W 41 IN Keeping House KY NC Walter STROUD Son S Male W 18 IN IN IN Sharlotty STROUD Other S Female W 14 IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [83624]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [83625]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [83626]

Event
Type: Pension Roll

1900 Vernon Co., MO census, Virgil TWP, p 137.

Sources for Annel Stroud:

Source 1
Title: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 13th Infantry Reg’t, Indiana
Extracted Text: Regimental History Thirteenth Infantry INDIANA (3 years)

Thirteenth Infantry. Cols., Jeremiah C. Sullivan, Robert G. Foster, Cyrus J. Dobbs, John H. Lawrence; Lieut.-Cols., Will Cumback, Horace Heffren, Robert S. Foster, Cyrus J. Dobbs, John M. Wilson, Samuel M. Zent, Majs., Robert S. Foster, Cyrus J. Dobbs, John M. Wilson, John C. Burton John H. Lawrence, Richard J. Graham.

This regiment was originally accepted for state service for one year and was organized at Indianapolis for the U. S. service by volunteers from the companies in camp. It was one of the first four regiments volunteering from the state for three years and was mustered in June 19, 1861.

It left the state July 4, and joined Gen. McClellan’s forces at Rich Mountain, W. Va., July 10 participating in the battle at that place the following day. It was in numerous skirmishes about Cheat Mountain in September, supported a battery at Green Brier in October and was in the battle of Camp Alleghany in December.

It then moved to Green Spring Run, where it remained until March, when it took part in the battle of Winchester Heights, and joined in pursuit of Jackson’s army as far as New Market. Col. Sullivan was appointed brigadier-general on May 2 and Lieut.-Col. Foster was made colonel.

The regiment was in the engagement at Summerville, and then moved in pursuit of the enemy to Luray and Alexandria. It embarked on June 28 for Harrison’s landing, where it remained from July 2 to Aug. 15, when it marched for Fortress Monroe. From there it moved to Suffolk, and engaged in reconnaissances during the fall and winter. It was in the engagement at Deserted House, and aided in the defeat of Longstreet, in his attempt to sieze Suffolk in the spring of 1863.

Col. Foster was appointed brigadier-general on June 16, and Lieut.-Col. Cyrus J. Dobbs was promoted to colonel. On June 27, the regiment joined the expedition north of Richmond and sailed for Folly island, Charleston Harbor, July 28. It
participated in the siege operations of Forts Wagner and Gregg, being the first regiment to enter Fort Wagner in the assault of Sept. 7.

Part of the regiment reenlisted as veterans in December and were furloughed home. The regiment moved to Jacksonville, Fla., in Feb., 1864, remaining there until April 17, when it was transferred to Gloucester Point, Va., and assigned to the 2nd brigade, 3rd division, 10th corps.

It participated in most of the operations of Gen. Butler’s army south of Richmond, was engaged at Port Walthal Junction, Chester Station, and in the charge on the enemy’s rifle pits, losing nearly 200 men in these engagements. It was attached to the 3rd brigade, 3rd division, 18th corps on May 26, and joined the Army of the Potomac at Cold Harbor June 1.

After the battle of Cold Harbor it participated in the early assaults on the works at Petersburg. The non-veterans left for Indianapolis on June 19, and were mustered out on the 24th. The regiment engaged in the charge at the Crater, July 30, and was in the trenches before Petersburg until September.

It was in the battles of Strawberry Plains, at Chaffin’s Bluff and Fort Gilmer and in the attack on Richmond in October. It was sent to New York during the election in November, and joined the first expedition to Fort Fisher in December, returning to Chaffin’s Bluff on the 31st.

The veterans and recruits were reorganized into a battalion of five companies on Dec. 6 and five companies of drafted men were added later, making a full regiment. It participated in the assault on Fort Fisher in Jan. 1865 in the capture of Fort Anderson and the occupation of Wilmington, and was stationed at Raleigh, until July 20, when it was assigned to duty at Goldsboro, where it remained until mustered out, Sept. 5, 1865.

The original strength of the regiment was 1,047. Gain by recruits, 192; reenlistments, 148; unassigned recruits, 40, total, 1,427. Loss by death 136; desertion, 103; unaccounted for 25. At its reorganization, the original strength was 980. Gain by recruits, 166; total 1,146. Loss by death, 98; desertion, 1; unaccounted for 30.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 3

Battles Fought:

Battle at Bermuda Hundred, Virginia Battle at Bolton Church, Virginia Battle at Hampton, Virginia Battle at Rich Mountain, West Virginia on 11 July 1861 Battle at Cheat Mountain, West Virginia on 15 September 1861 Battle at Green Briar River, West Virginia on 03 October 1861 Battle at Allegheny, West Virginia on 13 December 1861 Battle at Winchester, Virginia on 23 March 1862 Battle on 03 May 1862 Battle on 03 October 1862 Battle at Blackwater, Virginia on 12 December 1862 Battle at Chester Station, Virginia on 10 May 1864 Battle at Foster’s Farm, Virginia on 19 May 1864 Battle at Foster’s Farm, Virginia on 20 May 1864 Battle at Weir Bottom Church, Virginia on 20 May 1864 Battle at Cold Harbor, Virginia on 01 June 1864 Battle at Petersburg, Virginia on 29 June 1864 Battle at Petersburg, Virginia on 30 June 1864 Battle at Petersburg, Virginia on 01 July 1864 Battle at Petersburg, Virginia on 06 July 1864 Battle at Petersburg, Virginia on 30 July 1864 Battle at Deep Bottom, Virginia on 16 August 1864 Battle at Petersburg, Virginia on 15 September 1864 Battle at Fort Fisher, North Carolina on 15 January 1865 Battle at Fort Fisher, North Carolina on 16 January 1865 Battle at Sugar Loaf Hill, North Carolina on 11 February 1865 Battle at Kinston, North Carolina on 15 April 1865
ABBR: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 13th Infantry Reg’t, Indiana
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

81. 6Nancy Jane Stroud, dau. of 5William Stroud [25] and Nancy Jarrold. Born about 1837 in Clay City, Clay, Indiana, USA. Died about 1857, about 20 years old.

Married David Marion Bruner on 20 Jan. 1856 in Crawford, Indiana when about 19 years old (David Marion was 22 years old). David Marion Bruner b. on 2 Oct. 1833 in Harrison; d. on 18 Nov. 1911 in Floyd, 78 years old.

Issue of Nancy Jane Stroud and David Marion Bruner:

166   i. dau. 7Amanda Bruner b. in Nov. 1856 in Harrison.

Notes on David Marion Bruner:

Notes for the family of David Marion Bruner and Nancy Jane Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book B page 263Assessment: 4Note: Married by James Totten, JP

Sources for the family of David Marion Bruner and Nancy Jane Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of 5Thomas Stroud Jr. [26] (4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Eliza Aston

82. 6Joseph F. Stroud, son of 5Thomas Stroud Jr. [26] and Eliza Aston. Born about 1828 in Orange, Indiana. Died on 18 Aug. 1868/9 in Effingham, Illinois. Buried in Effingham, Illinois, Stroud Cemetery.

Married first Louisa Jane White on 28 Feb. 1853 in Orange when about 25 years old (Louisa Jane was about 17 years old). Louisa Jane White b. about 1836; d. between 1861 and 1864 in Effingham.

Issue of Joseph F. Stroud and Louisa Jane White:

      i. son 7William Henry Stroud b. about 1856; d. about 1877, about 21 years old.
167   ii. dau. Eliza Jane Stroud b. on 9 May 1858.
168   iii. son Hannibal Hamlin Stroud b. in March 1861.

Married second Catherine Ann Bayore on 26 Jan. 1865 when about 37 years old (Catherine Ann was 20 years old). Catherine Ann Bayore b. on 17 March 1844; d. in March 1923, about 79 years old.

Issue of Joseph F. Stroud and Catherine Ann Bayore:

      iv. son 7America E. Stroud b. on 18 Jan. 1865; d. on 8 Aug. 1868 in Effingham, three years old.
      v. son Thomas Jefferson Stroud b. on 17 Dec. 1866; d. on 20 Oct. 1868 in Effingham, a year old.
      vi. dau. Margaret Irene Stroud b. in 1868 in Effingham; m. J. M. Graham.

83. 6Ura A. Stroud, son of 5Thomas Stroud Jr. [26] and Eliza Aston. Born on 20 Feb. 1831 in Orange, Indiana. Died on 25 Jan. 1889 in Effingham, Illinois, 57 years old. Buried in Effingham, Illinois, Mt. Zion Cemetery.

Married first Sarah Jane Kethers on 3 Dec. 1853 when 22 years old (Sarah Jane was 15 years old). Sarah Jane Kethers b. on 21 Oct. 1838; d. on 19 Nov. 1862, 24 years old.

Issue of Ura A. Stroud and Sarah Jane Kethers:

      i. son 7Claiborne Stroud b. on 30 June 1857; d. on 12 July 1876, 19 years old; bur. in Jasper, Illinois, Mcqueen Cemetery.
      ii. dau. G. A. Stroud b. on 15 Nov. 1859; d. on 19 Dec. 1862, three years old; bur. in Jasper.

Married second Elizabeth Hanley on 11 Feb. 1863 when 31 years old (Elizabeth was about 25 years old). Elizabeth Hanley b. about 1838 in Morgan, Kentucky; d. about 1879, about 41 years old.

Issue of Ura A. Stroud and Elizabeth Hanley:

      iii. dau. 7Cora Stroud b. about 1865 in Illinois.
      iv. dau. Mary Stroud b. about 1867 in Illinois.

Married third Martha A. Cassidy about 1868 when about 37 years old (Martha A. was about 30 years old). Martha A. Cassidy b. on 25 Aug. 1838 in Kentucky; d. on 31 March 1880, 41 years old.

Issue of Ura A. Stroud and Martha A. Cassidy:

      v. dau. 7Frances Stroud b. about 1869.
      vi. son Ner James Stroud b. about 1874.
      vii. son Stephen Thomas Stroud b. on 14 Jan. 1879; d. on 19 Feb. 1879 in Illinois, a month old; bur. in Jasper, Illinois, Bailey Cemetery.

Married fourth Elizabeth Tucker on 25 Jan. 1881 when 49 years old. Elizabeth Tucker b. in Clay.

Notes on Ura A. Stroud:

Event: - Union Army Co H, 38 Reg, Illinois
Type: Military Service
Place: War (1861-1865) (Civil)
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Ura Stroud
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 14 SEP 1886 [54363]
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): Ura Stroud
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [54367]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [54368]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [54369]

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Effingham, Illinois
Note: census, Union Township, Hsld 19.

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Effingham, Illinois, Union Township
See source 3 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0205, Page Number 469D
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Urie A. STROUD Self W Male W 49 IN Farmer IN IN Fanny STROUD Dau S Female W 10 IL Keeping House IN KY Ner STROUD Son S Male W 6 IL IN KY Lud. L. HANLEY SSon S Male W 19 IL Laborer IN KY
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [54389]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [54390]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [54391]

Residence
Date: 1883
Place: , Effingham, Illinois

Other sources list dob as 25 Dec 1832.

Sources for Ura A. Stroud:

Source 1
Title: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 38th Infantry Reg’t, Illinois
Extracted Text: Regimental History ILLINOIS THIRTY-EIGHTH INFANTRY. (Three Years)

The Thirty-eighth Infantry Illinois Volunteers was organ ized at Camp Butler, Illinois, in September, 1861, by Colonel William P. Carlin. September 20,1861, was ordered to Pilot Knob, Missouri, receiving its arms en route. Colonel Carlin was placed in command of the post. October 20, marched to Fre- dericktown, and 21st was engaged in the battle at that place with the enemy under Jeff. Thompson.

The Regiment remained at Pilot Knob during the winter.

March 3,1862, moved to Reeves’ Station, on Black River, arriving on the 10th. Here the troops, consisting of Twenty- first, Thirty-third and Thirty-eighth Illinois Infantry, Elev- enth Wisconsin Infantry, Fifth, Seventh and Ninth Illinois Cav alry, First Indiana Cavalry, and Sixteenth Ohio Battery, were organized into the Division of South-east Missouri, under com mand of Brigadier General F. Steele. First Brigade, Colonel Carlin commanding, consisted of Twenty-first and Thirty-eighth Illinois Infantry, Fifth Illinois Cavalry, and Sixteenth Ohio Battery.

March 31, moved from Reeves’ Station to Doniphan. April 17, crossed Current River; 21st, reached Pocahontas, Arkansas.

April 30, marched for Jacksonport. Arkansas, arriving May 4.

May 10, the Twenty-first and Thirty-eighth were ordered to Cape Girardeau, Missouri, 220 miles distant. This march was made in ten days, a day and a half of which time was spent in ferrying Black and Current Rivers. May 24, arrived at Hamburg Landing. Moved to the front, and were before Corinth during the last days of the siege - in Second Brigade, Fourth Divi sion, Left Wing Army of Mississippi, Colonel Carlin commanding Brigade, Brigadier General Jeff. C. Davis commanding Division, and Major General John Pope commanding Army of the Mississippi.

Marched to Danville, Booneville, back to Corinth, and to Jacinto. During the last of June marched to Ripley, and re- turned by forced marches, arriving July 4, 1862. Remained in camp till August 14, when marched with the Division to join the Army of the Ohio, under General Buell. Passing through Iuka, Mississippi, crossed the Tennessee at Eastport; thence marched via Florence, Alabama, Lawrenceburg, Mt. Pleasant, Columbia, Franklin, Murfreesboro and Nashville, Tennessee, Bowling Green, Mumfordsville, Elizabethtown, and West Point, Kentucky, arriv- ing at Louisville, Kentucky September 26, 1862, having marched, night and day, about 500 miles.

October 1, marched from Louisville in the Thirty-first Brigade, Ninth Division, Army of the Ohio - Colonel Carlin commanding Brigade, and General Robert B. Mitchell commanding Di- vision.

October 8, engaged in battle of Perryville, Major D. H. Gilmer commanding, and captured an ammunition train, two caissons and about 100 prisoners. Was honorably mentioned in General Mitchell’s resort of the battle, Joined in pursuit of Bragg as far as (drab Orchard, and then marched through Lancaster, Danville, Lebanon and Bowling Green, to Edgefield Junction, near Nashville. arriving November 9.

Went on a scout to Harpeth Shoals with Fifteenth Wisconsin Volunteers, and returned November 20, having destroyed a large quantity of salt, and captured a rebel wagon train and one hun- dred horses and mules.

Advanced from Nashville, December 26, 1862, and with the Brigade, (Second Brigade, First Division, Right Wing of Army of Cumberland), charged a battery at Knob Gap, near Nolensville, capturing two guns. Regimental loss, 3 killed and 8 wounded.

Engaged in the battle of Stone River, from December 30, 1862, to January 4 1863. December 31, the Brigade was heavily engaged, repulsed three heavy charges, and held the position until the enemy, having driven Johnson’s Division, came heavily on the flank and forced the line to retire. Regiment lost in this engagement, 34 killed, 109 wounded, and 34 missing.

Encamped until June. Meantime the Right Wine was changed to the Twentieth Army Corps.

When the enemy advanced on Tullahoma, the Twentieth Army Corps moved on Liberty Gap, and engaged the enemy, June 24, 25 and 26. On the 25th the Thirty-eighth was ordered to relieve the Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania, of General Willich’s Brigade of General Johnson’s Division who were hotly pressed by the enemy. The Thirty-eighth charged across a plowed field, under heavy fire, and drove the enemy from their works, capturing the flag of the Second Arkansas. June 26, skirmished with the en- emy all day, losing 3 killed and 19 wounded. That night the enemy withdrew.

Marched through Manchester, and camped at Winchester, Tennessee. August 17, 1863, crossed the Cumberland Mountains to Stevenson, Alabama; 30th, crossed the Tennessee River at Caperton’s Ferry. Crossed Sand Mountain and camped in Will’s Val- ley. September 9, crossed Lookout Mountain, and camped in Broomtown Valley, about 60 miles south of Chattanooga.

September 13 and 14, recrossed Lookout Mountain to Will’s Valley; 16th , ascended Lookout Mountain, and marched 26 miles, on the top, to Stevens’ Gap; 17th, entered McLemore’s Cave, and laid in line of battle before Due Gap, in Pigeon Mountains; 17th, at dark, moved to the left, to Pond Springs; 19th, marched past Crawfish Springs and entered the battle of Chickamauga, near Gordon’s Mills. Double quicking, a line was formed, under fire, and was hotly engaged till dark. September 20, was moved to the left. Went into position at 10 A.M., and was heavily engaged. The enemy, pressing through a gap made by the withdrawal of General Woods’ Division, forced the line back, and the Brigade narrowly escaped capture. Was re-formed on the hills, in the rear of the battle ground, and marched toward McFarland’s farm. We then marched toward the right, where General Thomas was continuing the fight. After dark, returned to McFarland’s farm. Loss, Lieutenant Colonel D. H. Gilmer, killed, and Major Alden severely wounded. Of 301 men who en- tered the fight, 180 were killed, wounded or missing.

September 21, Captain W. C. Harris, being relieved from Brigadier General Carlin’s staff. took command of the Regiment; 22d, moved into Chattanooga, and remained till the last of October, working on fortifications, etc. The Twentieth Army Corps was broken up, and Twenty-first and Thirty-eighth Illinois, One Hundred and First Ohio and Eighty-first Indiana were assigned to First Brigade, First Division, Fourth Army Corps.

October 26,1863, marched to Bridgeport, Alabama, and went into winter quarters.

January 26, 1864, moved through Chattanooga to Ooltawah. On the night of February 17, moved out with a detachment of Fourth Michigan Cavalry, and, at daylight, surprised and captured a rebel outpost, a few miles from Dalton, Georgia, and returned to camp in the afternoon.

February 29,1964, the Regiment re-enlisted, and was mustered March 16,1864. Started for Illinois March 28. Arrived at Springfield, Ill., April 8. Rendezvoused at Mattoon.

May 14, moved from Mattoon, via Indianapolis, to Louisville. Lieutenant Colonel W. T. Chapman took command of the Regiment at Louisville, May 17. Arrived at Nashville, 21st; 22d, a train bearing part of the Regiment was thrown from the track by a torpedo, and several men injured.

May 27, left Chattanooga with a drove of cattle, which at Resaca was increased to 1,700 head, and arrived at Ackworth June 8. On the 9th rejoined the Brigade; 10th, moved upon the enemy at Pine Top. Engaged near Pine Top till 18th, and at Ke- nesaw Mountain until July 3; 3d, passed through Marietta; 4th, were engaged at Smyrna. July 5, reached the Chattahoochie River; 12th, crossed the Chattahoochie at Power’s Ferry; 20th, crossed Peach Tree Creek; 21st, engaged at outer lines before Atlanta; 22d, threw up works before Atlanta; 26th, moved to works protecting rear and left of the lines. August 1, the Corps relieved the Twenty-third Corps, on the left. August 26, withdrew from the lines in the night; 26th, Regiment was rear guard, and had a brisk skirmish; 31st, on railroad, below Rough and Ready. September 1, engaged in the battle of Jonesboro. September 2, moved to Lovejoy, and threw up works on the left of the lines; 8th, camped at Atlanta.

Loss of the Thirty-eighth, in the campaign; 4 killed, 36 wounded, 3 missing.

October 3, marched in pursuit of Hood, via Marietta, Actworth and Allatoona, to Kingston, thence to Rome, Resaca, Ship’s Gap, Summerville, to Gaylorsville, Alabama, and after halting a few days, marched to Chattanooga, arriving October 30,1864.

October 31, the First Brigade started as escort to wagon train of Fourth Corps, for Huntsville, the remainder of the Corps going by rail. Passing through Shell Mound, Bridgeport and Stevenson, crossed Cumberland Mountain at Tantallon. Passed through Cowan, Dechard, Winchester, Salem, and Fayetteville, rejoining the Corps at Pulaski, Tennessee, November 12,1864.

November 23, Lieutenant Colonel Chapman died, and the command devolved upon Captain A. H. Pollard.

Arrived at Columbia, Tennessee, November 26, November 25, and 26, threw up works and skirmished with the enemy; 27th, crossed Duck River in the night: 28th, threw up works opposite the Ford; 29th, moved and threw up works on the left flank; withdrew in the night and marched through Spring Hill, passing a large rebel camp; marched alongside the train to Franklin. with rebel cavalry on the flanks.

30th, entered Franklin. About half past four the enemy advanced, driving in our skirmishers, but were driven back by the main line. Withdrew at midnight, and crossing the Harpeth River, reached Nashville. December 1, occupied in building fortifications and doing outpost duty; 15th, was placed in position near the Hardin pike, and at four o’clock P.M., were in the charge on Montgomery Hill, and among the first to enter the enemy’s works; 16th, was in the reserve line and joined in pursuit, when the enemy’s line was broken. Was in pursuit to Lexington, Alabama. Marched to Huntsville, arriving January 5,1865. Remained at Huntsville until March 13,1865 - Lieuten- ant Colonel Ed. Colyer taking command February 1.

March 13th, proceeded by rail to Strawberry Plains, East Tennessee; 24th, moved to Lick Creek, near Bull’s Gap. April 3, Brigade was ordered on an expedition to Asheville, North Carolina. Returned 11th; 2Oth, took cars for Nashville. June 7th, the non-veteran Regiments having been mustered out, the Twenty-first and Thirty-eighth Illinois were assigned to Second Brigade, First Division, Fourth Army Corps, the Brigade also containing Ninth, Thirtieth and Thirty-fifth Indiana Veteran Volunteers, Colonel J. C. B. Leeman, commanding Brigade.

June 17, moved to Johnsonville; 19th embarked on Steamer Palestine; 20th, passed Cairo: 25th, landed at New Orleans; July 12, embarked on Steamer Clinton, and landed at Indianola, Texas, 15th; 17th, marched to Green Lake. August 8 and 9, marched through Victoria, and camped on the Guadaloupe River.

December 31, 1865, Regiment stationed at Victoria, Texas. Regiment mustered out of United States’ service and ordered to Springfield, Ill., for final payment and discharge.


Source: Illinois Adjutant-General’s Report, vol. 3, p. 101

Battles Fought

Fought on 26 December 1862 at Knob Gap, TN. Fought on 30 December 1862 at Stones River, TN. Fought on 31 December 1862 at Stones River, TN. Fought on 25 June 1863 at Liberty Gap, TN. Fought on 26 June 1863 at Liberty Gap, TN. Fought on 19 September 1863 at Chickamauga, GA. Fought on 20 September 1863 at Chickamauga, GA. Fought on 23 June 1864 at Bald Knob, GA. Fought on 02 July 1864 at Kenesaw Mountain, GA. Fought on 06 August 1864 at Atlanta, GA. Fought on 16 August 1864 at Atlanta, GA.
ABBR: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 38th Infantry Reg’t, Illinois
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: United States Military Medal - The Civil War Campaign Medal - Army
Extracted Text: Criteria: Service between 15 April 1861 and 9 April 1865, or in Texas between 15 April 1861 and 20 August 1866.
ABBR: United States Military Medal - The Civil War Campaign Medal - Army
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 3
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Sarah Jane Kethers:

Burial
Note: McQueen Cemetery.

Notes on Martha A. Cassidy:

Burial
Note: Bailey Cemetery

84. 6Eliza Vandalia Stroud, dau. of 5Thomas Stroud Jr. [26] and Eliza Aston. Born about 1834 in Orange, Indiana. Died in Iowa City, Johnson, Iowa.

Married Nelson B. Tilton on 2 Dec. 1852 in Effingham, Effingham, Illinois when about 18 years old (Nelson B. was 22 or 23 years old). Nelson B. Tilton b. in 1829 in Ohio.

Issue of Eliza Vandalia Stroud and Nelson B. Tilton:

      i. son 7_____ Tilton b. in 1863 in Iowa.
      ii. dau. Mary Tilton b. in 1865 in Iowa.

Notes on Nelson B. Tilton:

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Jasper, Iowa, Clear Creek Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0346, Page Number 5B
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Nelson TILTON Self M Male W 51 OH Farmer OH OH Eliza TILTON Wife M Female W 46 IN Keeping House IN NY TILTON Son S Male W 17 IA OH IN Mary TILTON Dau S Female W 15 IA OH IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [55323]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [55324]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [55325]

Sources for Nelson B. Tilton:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

85. 6Ner Stroud, son of 5Thomas Stroud Jr. [26] and Eliza Aston. Born on 4 July 1841 in Orange, Indiana. Died on 7 March 1918 in Effingham, Illinois, 76 years old. Buried on 9 March 1918 in Effingham, Illinois, Mt. Zion Cemetery.

Married Mary Francis Merry, dau. of Pertman Merry and Mary June Norman, on 5 Nov. 1865 in Decatur, Macon, Illinois when 24 years old (Mary Francis was 21 years old). Mary Francis Merry b. on 16 Jan. 1844 in Greenville, Bond, Illinois, USA; d. on 28 Jan. 1908 in Effingham, 64 years old; bur. in Effingham.

Issue of Ner Stroud and Mary Francis Merry:

169   i. dau. 7Mary Elizabeth Stroud b. on 27 Jan. 1868 in Winterrowd, Effingham, Illinois.
      ii. son Owen Noah Stroud b. on 22 June 1872 in Winterrowd; d. in Dec. 1872 in Winterrowd, about six months old.
170   iii. dau. Hattie Elizabeth Stroud b. on 29 Sep. 1875 in Winterrowd.
171   iv. son Pertman Waymack Stroud b. on 10 Oct. 1877 in Effingham.
172   v. son William Ura Stroud b. on 24 April 1880 in Winterrowd.
173   vi. son James Ner Stroud b. on 4 Oct. 1883 in Winterrowd.

Notes on Ner Stroud:

Event: - Union Army, Company L, 5th Cavalry Regiment Illinois
Type: Military Service
Date: SEP 1861-OCT 1865
Place: War (1861-1865) (Civil)
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Ner Stroud - application 255,349 certificate 168,296
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 14 SEP 1886 [54473]
Note: Civil War pension Ner Stroud (application 255,349 certificate 168,296) Ner Stroud enrolled as a private Sept. 1, 1861 and was discharged Dec. 31,1863. His final discharge was as a sergeant on Oct. 27, 1865. He was born July 4, 1840, one statement said at Orange Co. Ind. and another at Laurence Co. Ind. He was 5’ 10”, complexion fair, eyes gray, hair brown. His foot had been injured at Vicksburg. His post office at enlistment was Elliottstown, Effingham, Illinois. Ner married Mary Frances Merry Nov. 15, 1865 at Decatur, Macon Co. IL. He had not been previously married. His wife died Jan. 18, 1908. There were 3 lists of children in the file, each slightly different. In 1898 he listed living children as Eliza b. 1868, Hattie b. 1872, Mary Mae b. 1875, Ura b. 1880 and James b. 1883. In 1899, children living: Mary Eliza b. Jan. 27, 1868, Hattie Elizabeth b. Sept 29, 1875, Prettyman(?) Weymack b. Oct. 10, 1877, William Ura b. Apr. 4, 1880, James Ner b. Apr. 10, 1883, In 1915, all children: Eliza Flinn b. Jan 27, 1868, Hattie Lewis b. Sept 29, 1875 Owen Stroud b. Jan 22, 1872, Waymack Stroud b. Oc. 10, 1877, Ure Stroud b. Apr. 4, 1880, James Stroud b. Apr. 10, 1883 Susan Milligansimilligan@email.msn.com
Extracted text: In June 1861, Ner enlisted at the first call for three years in Company L, 5th Illinois Calvary under Capt Coldwell, serving in the same company until Oct 1865. Unit was mustered in Sep, 1861 at Effingham, IL and mustered out at Camp Butler in Oct 1865. The last three years of the War he served as Quartermaster Sergeant. During his service, Ner fought in over forty battles and engagements.
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [54506]

Event
Type: Pension Roll
Date: 18 MAY 1878
Place: Illinois
Note: Applied for and was awarded a pension for service during the Civil War.
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): Ner Stroud, Cert # 168.296
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Media format: jpg
Media file: Ner Stroud.jpg
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [54522]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [54523]

Sources for Ner Stroud:

Source 1
Title: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 5th Cavalry Reg’t, Illinois
Extracted Text: Regimental History ILLINOIS 5TH CAVALRY (Three Years)

Fifth Cavalry.-Cols., Hall Wilson, John McConnell, Lieut.-Cols., Benjamin L. Wiley, Thomas A. Apperson, Abel H. Seeley; Majs., Speed Butler, Thomas A. Apperson, Abel H. Seeley, James Farnan, Horace P. Mumford, George W. McConkey. This regiment was organized at Camp Butler in Nov., 1861, and mustered in for three years. On Feb. 20, 1862, it moved to Benton barracks, St. Louis Mo., and on March 27, marched to Doniphan, arriving there on April 1, driving out the enemy, capturing his camp, killing 3 and taking 7 prisoners. In October, a forage train was attacked by the enemy and 79 of the regiment were captured, after losing 1 killed and 6 wounded. In the spring of 1863 it entered the Vicksburg campaign and on June 3, made a reconnoissance to Mechanicsburg, drove the enemy 10 miles, skirmishing heavily. On the following day it formed a junction with two regiments of infantry and 8 pieces of artillery, attacked the enemy and defeated him, the regiment losing 1 killed and 7 wounded. In July, it accompanied an expedition to Canton, Miss., arriving there after some fighting, and after destroying the public workshops, railroads, etc., returned to the main army at Jackson. On Aug. 21, it encountered and defeated Blythe’s Confederate cavalry at Coldwater, the regiment losing 1 killed and 5 wounded. In October it took part in a cavalry charge at Brownsville, routing the Confederate Gen. Wirt Adams, and driving him from his position, the regiment losing 2 wounded and 1 prisoner. On Jan. 1, 1864, many in the regiment reenlisted as veterans, and in March, were furloughed home, returning to the command on May 10. The remainder of the regiment’s term of service was spent in Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas, engaged in scouting and guard duties. It was mustered out at Springfield, Ill., Oct. 27, 1865.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 3

Principal engagements:

Cotton Plant - July 6, 1862 Rock Roe, AK - Aug 16, 1862 McAlpins Farm - Oct 22 1862 Siege of Vicksburg for 43 days ending July 4, 1863 Clinton MS - July 8, 1863 Canton MS - July 12, 1863 (Captured city) Coldwater MS - Aug 20, 1863 Robinsons Mills - Oct 17/18, 1863, Under continual attack, the unit fought back to Clinton MS - Dec 8, 1863 Then at Dalton MS - Feb 4, 1864 Jackson MS - Feb 5, 1864, eight miles north of Jackson - Feb 6, 1864 Morton MS - Feb 8, 1864 Decatur MS - Feb 11/12, 1864 Meridian MS - Feb 14, 1864 Black River MS - May 12, 1864 Port Gibson MS - Sep 30, 1864 Monroe LA - Feb 12, 1864 Harrisburg LA - Feb 16, 1865.
ABBR: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 5th Cavalry Reg’t, Illinois
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: Pension records
ABBR: Pension records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

86. 6Samuel Josephus Stroud, son of 5Thomas Stroud Jr. [26] and Eliza Aston. Born on 23 Jan. 1844 in Effingham, Illinois. Died on 14 May 1927 in Effingham, 83 years old. Buried in Effingham, Illinois, Mt. Zion Cemetery.

Married Johanna Katherine Eilers on 2 April 1868 when 24 years old (Johanna Katherine was 16 years old). Johanna Katherine Eilers b. on 6 March 1852 in (Germany), Oldenberg; d. on 18 Nov. 1911 in Altamont, Effingham, Illinois, USA, 59 years old; bur. in Effingham.

Issue of Samuel Josephus Stroud and Johanna Katherine Eilers:

      i. son 7Charles Nathaniel Stroud b. on 8 June 1869 in Effingham; d. on 19 June 1888 in Effingham, 19 years old; bur. in Effingham.
      ii. son Fidellius Thomas Stroud b. on 26 Dec. 1870 in Effingham; d. on 7 Dec. 1874 in Effingham, three years old; bur. in Effingham.
      iii. son Samuel Edward Stroud b. on 2 June 1872 in Effingham; d. on 6 Nov. 1872 in Effingham, five months old; bur. in Effingham.
174   iv. dau. Eliza Helen Stroud b. on 3 Dec. 1873 in Effingham, Effingham, Illinois.
      v. son William Ure Nalls Stroud b. on 7 Aug. 1876 in Effingham; d. on 8 Aug. 1898 in Effingham, 22 years old; bur. in Effingham.
      vi. dau. Emma Lucretia Stroud b. on 26 Oct. 1878 in Effingham; d. on 16 April 1903 in Effingham, 24 years old; bur. in Effingham.
      vii. son Doctor Clayborn Garfiel Stroud M. D. b. on 3 Nov. 1880 in Effingham; d. on 16 Nov. 1958 in Clarksburg, Harrison, West Virginia, USA, 78 years old; bur. in Altamont; m. Garnett B. Posey (15 Aug. 1896 in Erbacon, Webster, West Virginia–16 June 1977 in Bridgeport, Harrison).
175   viii. dau. Bertha Mae Stroud b. on 31 Dec. 1883 in Mount Zion, Macon, Illinois.
      ix. dau. Ethel Sarah Stroud b. on 13 May 1885 in Illinois; d. in April 1968, 82 years old; bur. in Effingham, Illinois, Union Cemetery.
      x. son Roland Canby Stroud b. on 15 June 1887 in Illinois; d. on 10 Sep. 1955, 68 years old; bur. in Effingham.
      xi. son Francis Dewhurst Stroud b. on 12 Dec. 1889 in Effingham; bur. in Effingham; m. Mabel _____ (6 Sep. 1892–Aug. 1985 in Belleville, St. Clair, Illinois, USA).
176   xii. son Ernest Ray Stroud b. on 12 Dec. 1889 in Effingham.

Notes on Samuel Josephus Stroud:

Event: - Union Army, Company D, 54th Infantry Regiment Illinois
Type: Military Service
Date: 06 MAR 1862-15 OCT 1865
Place: War (1861-1865) (Civil)
See source 1 for this person
Extracted text: Samuel Stroud Residence: Occupation: Service Record: Promoted to Full Corporal. Enlisted as a Private on 06 March 1862. Enlisted in Company D, 54th Infantry Regiment Illinois on 26 May 1863. Mustered out on 15 October 1865 in Little Rock, AR . Sources: Illinois: Roster of Officers and Enlisted Men.
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [54571]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [54572]
See source 2 for this person
Extracted text: Samuel J. Stroud (pension application 333,751 certificate 214,797) Samuel J. Stroud was a corporal in Co. D, 54 Illinois Inf. In Oct. 1921, he said his wife’s maiden name was Johanna Katherine Eilers. They had been married Apr. 2, 1868 at Elliott’s Town, Illinois. His wife died Nov. 18, 1911. Their children were: Charles b. June 8, 1869 (deceased), Fidelis b. Dec. 29, 1870 (deceased), Samy b. June 20, 1873 (deceased), Eliza b. Dec. 31, 1874 (living), William b. Aug. 7, 1876 (deceased), Emma b. Oct. 26, 187(8?) (deceased), Garfield b. Nov. 30, 1880 (living), Bertha b. Dec. 31, 1882 (living), Ethel b. May 13, 1885 (living), Roland b. June 15, 1887 (living), Frank b. Dec. 12, 1889 (living), Ray b. Jan. 23, 1893 (living). From his death certificate, he was born Jan. 23, 1844 at Elliot Twp Ill. His father was Thomas Stroud, born North Carolina, his mother Mary Stroud, B. Orange Co. Ind. He had been a retired farmer. The informant was R. C. Stroud. Date of death was May 14, 1927. In Dec. 1932, there was a letter to Miss Ethel Stroud of Allimont Illinois, requesting the date of death of Samuel. In Aug. 1933, there was a note listing $100 in favor of Sarah Ethel Stroud, Cleveland OH for burial expenses. Susan Milligan similligan@email.msn.com
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [54598]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [54599]

Event
Type: Pension Roll
Date: 15 NOV 1879
Note: Applied for and was awarded a pension for service during the Civil War.
See source 3 for this person
Extracted text: Samuel J. Stroud, Cert# 214.797
Media format: jpg
Media file: Samuel J. Stroud.jpg
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [54620]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [54621]

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Effingham, Illinois
Note: census, Lucas Township, Hsld 68.

Sources for Samuel Josephus Stroud:

Source 1
Title: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 54th Infantry Reg’t, Illinois
Extracted Text: Regimental History ILLINOIS FIFTY-FOURTH INFANTRY (Three Years)

Fifty-fourth Infantry. - Cols., Thomas W. Harris, Green ville M Mitchell; Lieut.-Cols., Greenville M. Mitchell, Augus- tus H. Chapman; Hiram M. Scarborough; Majs., Augustus H. Chap- man, John W. True, Hiram M. Scarborough. This regiment was or- ganized at Camp Dubois Anna, Ill., in Nov., 1861, as a part of the “Kentucky Brigade,” and was mustered into the U. S. service Feb. 18, 1862. On Feb. 24 it was ordered to Cairo and on March 14 moved to Columbus, Ky. During the fall of 1862 Gen. Forrest captured detachments of the regiment, stationed as guards of railroads in Tennessee, destroyed nearly all the records, and the remainder of the records were lost by the quartermaster’s department, in transit from Columbus, Ky., to Jackson, Tenn. In Jan., 1864, three fourths of the regiment re-enlisted, as veterans, and were mustered Feb. 9, 1864, leaving for Mattoon, Ill., for veteran furlough on March 28. Returning to the front it fought Gen. Shelby in Arkansas, in May. On Aug. 24 it was attacked by Shelby with 4,000 men and 4 pieces of artillery, and one of the five stations which the regiment was guarding on the Little Rock railroad was captured. Six companies were then concentrated at another station and fought for 5 hours, when their hay breastworks caught fire from the enemy’s shells and they were driven out and captured by detail, after losing 14 men killed and 35 wounded. The regiment was exchanged Dec. 5, 1864, and arrived at Hickory Station on the Memphis & Little Rock railroad, Jan. 18, 1865, where it remained as railroad guard until June 6. It was mustered out Oct. 15, 1865, having had a total enrollment from the time of its original organiza- tion, of 71 commissioned officers and 1,342 enlisted men.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 3

Battles Fought

Fought on 24 August 1864 at Jones’ Station, AR. Fought on 01 October 1864. Fought on 21 October 1864.
ABBR: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 54th Infantry Reg’t, Illinois
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: Notes of Susan Milligan
ABBR: Notes of Susan Milligan
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y
Repository: n/a, n/a

Source 3
Title: Pension records
ABBR: Pension records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Johanna Katherine Eilers:

GEDCOM The place name “(Germany)” must begin with a letter, digit or ‘: 0 @I2163@ INDI ◊ 1 BIRT ◊ 2 PLAC (Germany), Oldenberg [55025]

87. 6Ephriam Joy Stroud, son of 5Thomas Stroud Jr. [26] and Eliza Aston. Born in 1847 in Effingham, Effingham, Illinois. Died in 1918 in Perry, Noble, Oklahoma, 70 or 71 years old. Buried in Noble, Oklahoma, Grace Hill Cemetery.

Married Mary E. Wathens. Mary E. Wathens b. in 1855 in Tennessee; d. after 1919 in Oklahoma, at least 64 years old.

Issue of Ephriam Joy Stroud and Mary E. Wathens:

177   i. son 7Herschel Starr Stroud b. on 28 Feb. 1879.

Notes on Ephriam Joy Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I2148@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Noble, Oklahoma, Grace Hill Cemetery, Perry [54721]

Event: - Union Army, Company K, 48th Infantry Regiment Illinois
Type: Military Service
Date: 05 NOV 1863-15 AUG 1865
Place: War (1861-1865) (Civil)
See source 1 for this person
Extracted text: Ephraim J Stroud Residence: Occupation: Service Record: Enlisted as a Private on 05 November 1863. Enlisted in Company K, 48th Infantry Regiment Illinois on 30 November 1863. Mustered out on 15 August 1865 in Little Rock, Arkansas. Sources: Illinois: Roster of Officers and Enlisted Men.

Event
Type: Pension Roll
Date: 06 AUG 1891
Place: Missouri
Note: Applied for and awarded pension for service during the Civil War.
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): Ephraim J. Stroud, Cert# 748 863
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Media format: jpg
Media file: Ephraim J. Stroud.jpg
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [54751]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [54752]

(Research):If the following census data is correct then this family does not belong in this file.

Joy STROUD Self M Male W 31 IL Broom Maker GER GER
Mary STROUD Wife M Female W 25 TN VA TN
Hershel STROUD Son S Male W 1 MO IL TN

Census Place 3rd Ward, Kansas City, Jackson, Missouri
Family History Library Film 1254693
NA Film Number T9-0693
Page Number 303A

Sources for Ephriam Joy Stroud:

Source 1
Title: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 48th Infantry Reg’t, Illinois
Extracted Text: Regimental History ILLINOIS FORTY-EIGHTH INFANTRY (Three-Years)

Forty-eighth Infantry. - Cols., Isham N. Haynie, William W. Sanford, Lucien Greathouse, Thomas L. B. Weems; Lieut.-Cols., Thomas H. Smith, William W. Sanford, Lucien Greathouse, Ashley T. Galbraith, Thomas L. B. Weems, John W. Ingersoll; Majs., William W. Sanford, Manning Mayfield, Lucien Greathouse, Wil- liam J. Stephenson, Ashley T. Galbraith, Edward Adams, John W. Ingersoll. This regiment was organized at Camp Butler, in the month of Sept., 1861, left for Cairo 900 strong on Nov. 11, and, after its arrival there, constructed barracks for winter quarters. In Jan., 1862, it was engaged in the reconnaissance in the rear of Columbus, Ky., under Gen. Grant. At Fort Donel- son, in connection with the 17th and 49th Ill., it charged the enemy’s works, but was repulsed with a severe loss, and was un- der fire during the following day, losing a few men wounded. During the third and last day of the battle it was fiercely engaged and lost 40 in killed and wounded. It was engaged in the battle of Shiloh bearing its full part and losing over half of its men in killed and wounded. It was in the siege of Cor- inth in May, 1862 in June was ordered to Bethel as garrison of that post and remained there until 1863. It moved to Memphis in June of the latter year and from thence to Vicksburg, where it participated in the operations in the rear of that place, and at Snyder’s bluff. It advanced with Gen. Sherman’s force against Jackson, participated in the siege and in the charge of July 16, losing 45 men killed and wounded. Being transferred to eastern Tennessee it took part in the battle of Missionary ridge and then followed the retreating enemy to Ringgold. Tak- ing part in the Knoxville expedition for the relief of Gen. Burnside, it arrived at Scottsboro, Ala., on Jan. 1, 1864, and although not yet recovered from their severe campaign, over nine-tenths of the men present re-enlisted as veterans. The regiment arrived at Springfield, Ill., on veteran furlough, Jan. 27, and rendezvoused at Centralia. Returning to the field, it participated in the Atlanta campaign, marched with Sherman to the sea and up through the Carolinas, thence to Washington, D. C., and thence to Louisville, Ky. From the lat- ter place it moved to Little Rock, Ark., and was mustered out there on Aug. 15, 1865.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 3

Battles Fought

Fought on 13 February 1862 at Fort Donelson, TN. Fought on 14 February 1862 at Fort Donelson, TN. Fought on 15 February 1862 at Fort Donelson, TN. Fought on 06 April 1862 at Shiloh, TN. Fought on 07 April 1862 at Shiloh, TN. Fought on 22 May 1863 at Germantown, PA. Fought on 22 May 1863 at Near Germantown. Fought on 26 May 1864 at Dallas, GA. Fought on 27 May 1864 at Near Dallas, GA. Fought on 28 May 1864 at Dallas, GA. Fought on 02 June 1864 at Dallas, GA. Fought on 06 June 1864 at New Hope Church, GA. Fought on 21 July 1864 at Atlanta, GA. Fought on 22 July 1864 at Atlanta, GA. Fought on 28 July 1864 at Atlanta, GA. Fought on 28 July 1864 at Ezra Church, GA. Fought on 28 July 1864 at Near Atlanta, GA. Fought on 09 August 1864 at Atlanta, GA. Fought on 10 August 1864 at Atlanta, GA. Fought on 11 August 1864 at Atlanta, GA. Fought on 17 August 1864 at Atlanta, GA. Fought on 23 August 1864 at Near Atlanta, GA. Fought on 31 August 1864 at Jonesboro, GA. Fought on 01 September 1864 at Jonesboro, GA. Fought on 04 September 1864 at Lovejoy Station, GA. Fought on 13 December 1864 at Fort McAllister, GA. Fought on 03 February 1865 at South Carolina. Fought on 15 February 1865.
ABBR: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 48th Infantry Reg’t, Illinois
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: Pension records
ABBR: Pension records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Mary E. Wathens:

Event
Type: Pension Roll
Date: 08 MAR 1919
Place: Oklahoma
Note: Applied for and awarded widows pension for Ephriam’s service during the Civil War.
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Mary E. Stroud, Cert# 872 803
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Media format: jpg
Media file: Ephraim J. Stroud.jpg
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [55368]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [55369]

Could have been Mary E. Thayers. Could Mary have been a widow? 1915 family photo notes Mary E. THAYERS as Ephraim’s wife. 1890 census shows wife as Mary W.

Sources for Mary E. Wathens:

Source 1
Title: Pension records
ABBR: Pension records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

88. 6Richard Nalls Stroud, son of 5Thomas Stroud Jr. [26] and Eliza Aston. Born in April 1849 in Effingham, Illinois. Died on 28 June 1927 in Effingham, 78 years old. Buried in Effingham, Illinois, Mt. Zion Cemetery.

Married Sarah Jane Duckworth, dau. of James Duckworth and Susan Ann Evans, on 31 Oct. 1873 when 24 years old (Sarah Jane was 21 years old). Sarah Jane Duckworth b. on 12 June 1852 in Anderson, Madison, Indiana; d. on 4 Feb. 1946 in Dietrich, Effingham, Illinois, 93 years old; bur. in Effingham.

Issue of Richard Nalls Stroud and Sarah Jane Duckworth:

178   i. dau. 7Daisia J. Stroud b. on 24 Sep. 1877.
179   ii. dau. Vandana Stroud b. on 20 July 1879.
180   iii. dau. Zolinda Helena Stroud b. on 31 Oct. 1880.
181   iv. son Rev. Austin Edgar Stroud b. on 11 May 1887 in Effingham, Illinois, Lucas Township.
      v. son Samuel Nalls Stroud b. on 28 May 1890; d. on 3 Oct. 1896, six years old.
182   vi. dau. Josephine Elizabeth Stroud b. on 21 Oct. 1891.

Notes on Richard Nalls Stroud:

Census
Date: 1880
Place: Johnson, Clark, Illinois
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0181, Page Number 78D
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Richard STROUD Self M Male W 29 IL Farmer ENG IRE Sarah J. STROUD Wife M Female W 27 IN Keeping House IN IN Dazie J. STROUD Dau S Female W 3 IL IL IN Vandania STROUD Dau S Female W 3M IL IL IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [54824]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [54825]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [54826]

Sources for Richard Nalls Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of 5Thomas Stroud Jr. [26] (4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Sarena Blunt Moody Blakely

89. 6Irena Helena Stroud, dau. of 5Thomas Stroud Jr. [26] and Sarena Blunt Moody Blakely. Born about 1860. Died in Jasonville, Greene, Indiana.

Married Thomas Herron on 31 March 1889 in Effingham, Illinois when about 29 years old (Thomas was about 23 years old). Thomas Herron b. about 1866.

Issue of Irena Helena Stroud and Thomas Herron:

183   i. dau. 7Mabel Herron b. in May 1890.

Notes on Thomas Herron:

Notes for the family of Thomas Herron and Irena Helena Stroud:

Marriage License: , Effingham, IllinoisPlace: , Effingham, Illinois


Issue of James Luther and 5Delaney Stroud [27] (4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1])

90. 6Mahala Luther, dau. of James Luther and 5Delaney Stroud [27]. Born about 1830 in Clay, Indiana.

Married Richard White about 1850 when about 20 years old (Richard was about 21 years old). Richard White b. in 1829 in Indiana.

Issue of Mahala Luther and Richard White:

      i. son 7William M. White b. in 1857 in Clay.
      ii. dau. Mary J. White b. in 1859 in Clay; m. Mr. Langford (abt. 1855–) about 1880 when about 21 years old (Mr. was about 25 years old).
      iii. dau. Louisa Arabell White b. in 1862 in Clay.
      iv. dau. Effie Ann White b. in 1869 in Clay.

Notes on Mahala Luther:

Birth
Note: She and Richard are in the 1850 census for Clay County. It looks like she is age 20. the record notes married with in the year.

Notes on Richard White:

Birth
See source 1 for this person
Extracted text: They are on page 652, in Harrison Township. Richard was 21 born Indiana, a laborer. Mahala 19 born Indiana, married with in the year.

Census
Date: 1850
Place: , Clay, Indiana

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Clay, Indiana
See source 2 for this person
Extracted text: They are listed in Harrison Township, page 55, enumerated on 6 July 1870. Richard White was 45 born Indiana. His occupation was farming, and he owned land worth $500 and personal property valued at $140. His wife was Mahala, I missed her age. Children at home were William M. 13, Mary J. 11, Louisa A. 8,and Effie Ann 1.
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [891774]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [891775]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Clay, Indiana, Sugar Ridge Township
See source 3 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0270, Page Number 530C
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Note: Note that Mary was listed as a daughter. I imagine Arabell was Louisa A. from the 1870s census, and Eva must be Effie Ann. I was interested to note that Richards said his parents were born in Kentucky. I have wondered if he was related to the White family out of Pulaski County, Kentucky, since there are other connections between that family and the Luther’s.
Extracted text: Richard WHITE Self M Male W 50 IN Farmer KY KY Mahala WHITE Wife M Female W 50 IN Housekeeping IN IN William WHITE Son S Male W 24 IN Farmer IN IN Arabell WHITE Dau S Female W 17 IN At Home IN IN Eva WHITE Dau S Female W 12 IN At Home IN IN Mary J. LANGFORD Dau S Female W 20 IN Making This Home IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [891803]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [891804]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [891805]

Sources for Richard White:

Source 1
Title: 1850 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1850 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 3
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

91. 6William Riley Luther, son of James Luther and 5Delaney Stroud [27]. Born on 30 April 1832 in Clay, Indiana. Died on 1 May 1874 in Clay, 42 years old.

Married Allie Melinda Haltom on 6 March 1856 when 23 years old (Allie Melinda was 23 years old). Allie Melinda Haltom b. on 8 June 1832 in Habersham, Georgia; d. on 27 Dec. 1906 in Owen, 74 years old.

Issue of William Riley Luther and Allie Melinda Haltom:

      i. dau. 7Dialtha Luther b. in 1858 in Clay; m. Isaac Jordan (abt. 1853–).
      ii. dau. Mahala Jane Luther b. on 5 Jan. 1869 in Clay; m. Daniel Hassler (abt. 1865–).
184   iii. son William Thomas Luther b. on 4 Sep. 1871 in Clay.

Notes on William Riley Luther:

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Clay, Indiana
Note: They are on page 59, living next door to Lewis Hardin, in Harrison Township. Riley Luther 40, Alley M 40, Dialtha Y 12, Mahala J. 3, all were born in Indiana.

Notes on Allie Melinda Haltom:

Birth
See source 1 for this person

Death
See source 1 for this person

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Owen, Indiana, Jackson Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0302, Page Number 227C
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Lucinda HALTOM Self W Female W 73 NC Farming NC NC A. LUTHER Dau W Female W 48 IN Keeping House NC NC Mahala LUTHER GDau S Female W 13 IN At School IN IN William S. LUTHER GSon S Male W 9 IN IN IN Henry JORDON GSon S Male W 18 IN Farm Hand IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [891386]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [891387]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [891388]

Sources for Allie Melinda Haltom:

Source 1
Author: Janice Hagan
Title: Hand written Family Listings and “Luther News” published 1986-1989
Publication: Athens, Georgia, about 1980.
ABBR: Correspondence--Janice Hagan
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

92. 6Ally Louiza Maria Luther, dau. of James Luther and 5Delaney Stroud [27]. Born in 1837 in Clay, Indiana. Died in 1875 in Indiana, 37 or 38 years old.

Married George Brock on 26 June 1856 in Clay when 18 or 19 years old (George was 22 or 23 years old). George Brock b. in 1833; d. about 1878 in Indiana, about 45 years old; m. (1) _____ _____ on 28 Jan. 1854 in Clay when 20 or 21 years old; m. (3) _____ _____ about 1876 in Clay when about 43 years old.

Issue of Ally Louiza Maria Luther and George Brock:

185   i. dau. 7Mary A. Brock b. in 1858 in Clay.
      ii. dau. Eliza J. Brock b. in 1861 in Clay; m. George Phipps (abt. 1860–) before 1880 in Clay when at most 18 years old.
      iii. dau. Sarah E Brock b. in 1864 in Clay; m. F Liza Luther (abt. 1860–) about 1886 when about 22 years old (F Liza was about 26 years old).
      iv. dau. Charlotte Brock b. on 20 Jan. 1860 in Clay; d. on 28 Jan. 1860 in Clay, eight days old.
      v. dau. Ida Radelle Brock b. in 1867 in Clay; m. David McLaughlin (abt. 1865–) about 1890 when about 23 years old (David was about 25 years old).
      vi. dau. Nancy A Brock b. in 1870 in Clay.
186   vii. dau. Mahala Alice Brock b. on 17 March 1873 in Clay.

Notes on Ally Louiza Maria Luther:

Death
Note: Note that the 1850 census simply gives her name as Louisa. Janice Hagan gave the rest of the name, and her death date.

Notes on George Brock:

Birth
See source 1 for this person
See source 2 for this person
Extracted text: George was the son of Richard and Anna Maynard Brock, who were listed in the 1850 census for Vigo Co, Indiana. A researcher working on the Luthers in Clay County said there was a book being written about the Brocks (1980s). Richard Brock died 17 Jan 1866. He and wife Anna are buried at Sanders Cemetery in Clay County.
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [891504]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [891505]

Death
See source 3 for this person
See source 2 for this person
Extracted text: I originally had his death date as 1875, however, Mr Hochstetler, knew that George married again after the death of Ally, had a son, before he died also. I wonder if May Rose also remarried after George Brock died, and the baby George is in the hshld of a stepfather in 1880?
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [891518]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [891519]

Census
Date: 1860
Place: , Clay, Indiana
See source 4 for this person
Extracted text: They are listed on page 639. George Brock born Indiana, Louisa 22 and Mary A age 2.
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [891528]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [891529]

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Clay, Indiana
Note: George was age 40, wife Louisa age 38, and they had the 5 children as listed here.

Notes for the family of George Brock and Ally Louiza Maria Luther:

See source 1 for this familySee source 2 for this familyMarriageNote: They were married by John S. Bayles, Justice of the Peace.

Notes for the family of George Brock and _____:

See source 1 for this family

Notes for the family of George Brock and _____:

See source 1 for this familyMarriageNote: The name of this wife was given by Max Hochstetler.

Sources for George Brock:

Source 1
Author: Janice Hagan
Title: Hand written Family Listings and “Luther News” published 1986-1989
Publication: Athens, Georgia, about 1980.
ABBR: Correspondence--Janice Hagan
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: Craig Beeman, Notes of
ABBR: Notes of Craig Beeman
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 3
Author: Hochstetler, T. Max
Title: Correspondence by email
Publication: Address: Maxhochstetler@prodigy.net (July 2000)
ABBR: Correspondence--Max Hochstetler
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 4
Title: 1860 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1860 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of George Brock and Ally Louiza Maria Luther:

Source 1
Author: Janice Hagan
Title: Hand written Family Listings and “Luther News” published 1986-1989
Publication: Athens, Georgia, about 1980.
ABBR: Correspondence--Janice Hagan
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Author: Clay County, Indiana
Title: State of Indiana, County of Clay, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Clay, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of George Brock and _____:

Source 1
Author: Clay County, Indiana
Title: State of Indiana, County of Clay, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Clay, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of George Brock and _____:

Source 1
Author: Hochstetler, T. Max
Title: Correspondence by email
Publication: Address: Maxhochstetler@prodigy.net (July 2000)
ABBR: Correspondence--Max Hochstetler
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of William Luther and 5Charlotte Stroud [28] (4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1])

93. 6James Luther, son of William Luther and 5Charlotte Stroud [28]. Born about 1828 in Indiana.

Married Cynthia _____. Cynthia _____ b. about 1832.

Issue of James Luther and Cynthia _____:

      i. dau. 7Cynthia R. Luther b. in 1850 in Clay City, Clay, Indiana, USA.

94. 6Malinda J. Luther, dau. of William Luther and 5Charlotte Stroud [28]. Born on 17 Dec. 1832 in Clay, Indiana. Died on 31 Jan. 1873 in Clay, 40 years old. Buried in Clay, Indiana, Cole Cemetery.

Married Lewis Hardin on 21 April 1858 in Clay when 25 years old (Lewis was about 28 years old). Lewis Hardin b. about 1830.

Issue of Malinda J. Luther and Lewis Hardin:

      i. son 7Robert H. Hardin b. in 1867 in Clay.
      ii. son Charles F. Hardin b. in 1872 in Indiana.

Notes on Malinda J. Luther:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I15208@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Clay, Indiana, Cole Cemetery, Harrison Twp [267567]

Notes on Lewis Hardin:

Census
Date: 1850
Place: , Clay, Indiana
See source 1 for this person
Extracted text: They are listed on page 59, in Harrison Township. Lewis Hardin 37 Ohio, a farmer, personal property $1800. Malinda J. 37, Robert H. 30, Mary E. 13. (The last three born Indiana) Is Mary E. his child by a previous wife?
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [892168]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [892169]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [892170]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Clay, Indiana, Clay Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0270, Page Number 561B
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Louis HARDIN Self M Male W 48 IN Farmer IN IN Amanda HARDIN Wife M Female W 28 IN Keeping House IN IN Robert HARDIN Son S Male W 12 IN At Home IN IN Charles F. HARDIN Son S Male W 8 IN At Home IN IN Emma B. HARDIN Dau S Female W 6 IN At Home IN IN Lilla HARDIN1 Dau S Female W 2M IN At Home IN IN Victoria HOLLIDAY2 Dau S Female W 7 IN At Home IN IN Martin HOLLIDAY3 Son S Male W 5 IN At Home IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [892195]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [892196]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [892197]

Notes for the family of Lewis Hardin and Malinda J. Luther:

MarriageNote: They were married by Lewis Raw, Justice of the Peace.Note that I have wondered which Malinda married Lewis, since there was another Malinda born about 1829. However, the 1860 census gives her age as 27.

Sources for Lewis Hardin:

Source 1
Title: 1850 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1850 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

95. 6Sarah A. Luther, dau. of William Luther and 5Charlotte Stroud [28]. Born about 1838. Died in 1855, about 17 years old.

Married John Lackey on 21 July 1853 in Clay, Indiana when about 15 years old.

Issue of Sarah A. Luther and John Lackey:

      i. son 7William Andrew Lackey b. on 17 April 1854 in Clay; d. on 21 Feb. 1948 in Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota, 93 years old; m. Isabelle Morehead on 13 Feb. 1879 when 24 years old.

Notes on John Lackey:

Notes for the family of John Lackey and Sarah A. Luther:

MarriageNote: They were married by James B Zenor

96. 6Peter Thomas Luther, son of William Luther and 5Charlotte Stroud [28]. Born on 18 Oct. 1844 in Clay, Indiana. Died on 29 Aug. 1929 in Clay, 84 years old.

Married Mary E. Crist, dau. of Nicholas M. Crist, on 29 Aug. 1867 in Clay when 22 years old (Mary E. was about 21 years old). Mary E. Crist b. about 1846 in Clark.

Issue of Peter Thomas Luther and Mary E. Crist:

      i. son 7William P. Luther b. in 1871 in Indiana.
      ii. son Infant Luther b. on 2 Aug. 1872 in Clay; d. on 2 Aug. 1872 in Clay, newborn.
      iii. dau. Minnie A Luther b. in 1869 in Indiana; m. William E. Barton (abt. 1870–) on 8 Nov. 1893 in Clay when 23 or 24 years old (William E. was about 23 years old).
      iv. son James Crist Luther b. in May 1876 in Clay; d. on 18 July 1877 in Clay, a year old.
      v. dau. Nellie Luther b. in 1879 in Indiana.

Notes on Peter Thomas Luther:

Birth
See source 1 for this person

See source 2 for this person
Extracted text: Peter T. Luther, a native of Clay county, son of William and Charlotte (Stroud) Luther, born in Harrison township, October 18, 1844, the only survivor of a family of eleven children. William Luther was a native of North Carolina, born in Randolph county, October 27, 1804, his wife a native of Crawford county, Indiana. About the year 1828 they came to Clay county. The family homestead was on the old Bowling Green, Middlebury road, now owned by George V. Goshorn. At nineteen years of age, having attended the public schools and made the best of his opportunities, the subject of this sketch began teaching. The first place at which he taught was then and is still known as the Cole school. After teaching several terms he attended the State University, at Bloomington. In 1866 he was nominated by the Democratic party for county surveyor, and elected, serving two years, meanwhile teaching during the winter season. In 1868 he was placed on the county ticket for recorder and elected, serving the term of four years. In 1872 he was nominated for clerk of the Clay circuit court, but was defeated in the election, the whole Democratic county ticket having been beaten in the campaign. of that year, the first time in the history of the county. After retiring from the recorders office he formed a law partnership with Samuel M. McGregor, at Bowling Green, which continued until the spring of 1874, when, in company with A. J. Montgomery, he purchased the Archives office, and began publication of the Clay County Herald. In the early part of the year 1875 the Clay Publishing Association was organized, composed of Thomas J. Gray, A. J. Montgomery and himself, buying the Brazil Weekly Echo, consolidating the interests of the two papers, the association conducting both of them. Two years later, having retired from the printing office, he accepted the deputyship in the office of clerk of the Clay circuit court, with Clerk Kilmer, and on quitting this position accepted that of office deputy, with Sheriff Jacob Baumunk, during his term of two years, from October, 1878, to October, 1880. Again, he resumed the law and engaged in the abstracting of titles in company with ex-Recorder L. J. Bowman. On the retirement of Bowman, in 1882, he associated with Charles E. Matson in the practice of law, abstracting of titles and real estate, under the firm name of Matson & Luther. This partnership existed until the latter part of the year 1899, a period of seventeen years. Following its dissolution Mr. Luther associated with him his son, William P. Luther, under the firm name of Luther & Luther, which began business on the first day of December, 1899. On the 29th day of August, 1867, Mr. Luther married Mary E. Crist, a native of Lewis township. To them were born five children, of whom a son and two daughters survive, all of whom are married. William Luther, the father, died December 18, 1864, aged 57 years, 1 month and 21 days. Nicholas M. Crist, father of Mrs. Luther, died July 18, 1886, aged 62 years, 7 months and 4 days. Crist was a native of Clark county, Indiana. Of the native-born population of Clay county there are now but few in P. T. Luthers class in points of age and experience. Substantially, the county has developed under his observation, so that, in points of personal acquaintance, practical knowledge of the countyís archives and familiar recollection of past times and events, traditional and otherwise, he is accepted as a veritable magazine of facts and figures in its history.

Occupation
Date: Abt 1863
Place: , Clay, Indiana
Note: teacher, at age 19, He first taught at Cole school. After teaching several terms he attended the State University, at Bloomington. In 1866, he was nominated by the Democratic party for county surveyor, and elected, serving two years, meanwhile teaching during the winter season.
See source 3 for this person

Occupation
Date: 1868
Place: , Clay, Indiana
Note: elected County recorder
See source 3 for this person

Occupation
Date: 1872
Place: , Clay, Indiana
Note: nominated for clerk of Circuit Court The entire Democratic slate lost that year, the first time in the history of the county. App that time, he formed a law partnership with a Samuel M. McGregor, at Bowling Green.

Occupation
Date: 1874
Place: , Clay, Indiana
Note: became a publisher Along with A J Montgomery, he purchased the “Archives” office, and began publication of the “Clay County Herald.” In 1875, the Clay Publishing Association was organized, with Mr. Montgomery, himself and Thomas J. Gray. They bought the Brazil “Weekly Echo”, consolidating the interests of the two papers. His association with the papers continued for two years.

Occupation
Date: 1877
Place: , Clay, Indiana
Note: a deputy clerk in the Circuit Court He also served as a deputy with Sheriff Jacob Baumunk from October 1878 to October 1880.

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Clay, Indiana
Note: They are in Washington Township, bids 344, enumerated 24 June, 1870. Peter T. Luther 25 Indiana, County recorder, real-estate $1000, personal property $500. Mary E. 23, Ormina (?) 1, Marvin V. Crist 24, County surveyor, Rachel C. Luther 11 who owned personal property worth $3000.

Occupation
Date: 1880
Place: , Clay, Indiana
Note: associated in a law firm First he worked in abstracting of titles with ex-Reincorder L J Bowman, then in 1882 with Charles. E. Matson. This partnership lasted until 1899. At that time, he associated with his son, William P. Luther, under the firm name of Luther & Luther.

Census
Date: 1880
Place: Brazil, Clay, Indiana, USA
See source 4 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0269, Page Number 426B
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Peter LUTHER Self M Male W 35 IN Deputy Sheriff NC IN Mary E. LUTHER Wife M Female W 33 IN Keeping House IN IN Minnie R. LUTHER Dau S Female W 11 IN At Home IN IN William LUTHER Son S Male W 9 IN IN IN Nellie LUTHER Dau S Female W 1 IN IN IN Rachel LUTHER Cousin S Female W 21 IN At Home IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [892418]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [892419]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [892420]

Notes for the family of Peter Thomas Luther and Mary E. Crist:

See source 1 for this familySee source 2 for this family

Sources for Peter Thomas Luther:

Source 1
Author: Janice Hagan
Title: Hand written Family Listings and “Luther News” published 1986-1989
Publication: Athens, Georgia, about 1980.
ABBR: Correspondence--Janice Hagan
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: “The Clay County Advocate”
MEDI: Newspaper
ABBR: “The Clay County Advocate”
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 3
Author: Travis, William
Title: “History of Clay County, Indiana”
Publication: Lewis Publishing Company, New York, 1909
MEDI: Book
ABBR: “History of Clay County, Indiana”
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 4
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Peter Thomas Luther and Mary E. Crist:

Source 1
Author: Travis, William
Title: “History of Clay County, Indiana”
Publication: Lewis Publishing Company, New York, 1909
MEDI: Book
ABBR: “History of Clay County, Indiana”
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Author: Clay County, Indiana
Title: State of Indiana, County of Clay, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Clay, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of 5Rev. Annual Stroud MG [29] (4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Elizabeth B. Larrance

97. 6Elisha Stroud, son of 5Rev. Annual Stroud MG [29] and Elizabeth B. Larrance. Born on 13 Nov. 1838 in Crawford, Indiana. Died on 10 March 1899 in Morehead, Neosho, Kansas, 60 years old.

Married Ruth Adeline Rawlings, dau. of Stephen B. Rawlings and Mary (Polly) Whitman, on 2 Nov. 1859 when 20 years old (Ruth Adeline was 20 years old). Ruth Adeline Rawlings b. on 14 June 1839 in Indiana; d. on 23 July 1905 in Morehead, 66 years old.

Issue of Elisha Stroud and Ruth Adeline Rawlings:

      i. son 7Wilson Andrew Stroud b. on 20 Dec. 1859 in Indiana.
      ii. dau. Mary Elizabeth Stroud b. on 5 May 1861 in Indiana.
      iii. son Steven Arnold Douglas Stroud b. on 9 Sep. 1862 in Indiana; d. on 6 Oct. 1862, three weeks old.
      iv. son Charles Mc Clellan Stroud b. on 30 Aug. 1865 in Indiana.
      v. dau. Cynthia Isabelle Stroud b. on 2 June 1867 in Indiana.
187   vi. dau. Sarah Emma Stroud b. on 21 Feb. 1876 in Morehead.
      vii. dau. Lillian Francis Stroud b. on 29 June 1882.

Notes on Elisha Stroud:

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 13 & 14, Line 95
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [79967]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [79968]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [79969]

Census
Date: 1860
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): Page 59, Line 421
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Elisha age 21 Ruth age 20 Emanual W. age 5/12

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Neosho, Kansas, Shiloh
See source 3 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0391, Page Number 266D
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Elisha STROUD Self M Male W 41 IN Farmer SC IN Ruth A. STROUD Wife M Female W 40 IN Keeping House KY KY Annual W. STROUD Son S Male W 20 IN Farmer IN IN Mary E. STROUD Dau S Female W 19 IN IN IN Charles M. STROUD Son S Male W 14 IN Works On Farm IN IN Cyntha B. STROUD Dau S Female W 12 IN At School IN IN Sarah E. STROUD Dau S Female W 4 KS IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [80001]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [80002]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [80003]

Sources for Elisha Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1860 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1860 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Source 3
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

98. 6Jeremiah Stroud, son of 5Rev. Annual Stroud MG [29] and Elizabeth B. Larrance. Born on 11 Oct. 1842 in Crawford, Indiana. Died about 1919 in Kansas, about 77 years old.

Married first Martha A. Vance on 16 Feb. 1865 in Crawford when 22 years old (Martha A. was 21 or 22 years old). Martha A. Vance b. in 1843 in Crawford.

Issue of Jeremiah Stroud and Martha A. Vance:

      i. dau. 7Alla S. Stroud b. in 1871 in Indiana.
      ii. dau. Aroma M. Stroud b. in 1873 in Indiana.

Married second Celestia A. _____.

Notes on Jeremiah Stroud:

Event: - Union Army, Company F, 59th Infantry Regiment Indiana
Type: Military Service
Date: 02 DEC 1861-19 AUG 1862
Place: War (1861-1865) (Civil)
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Jeremiah Stroud
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 14 SEP 1886 [80028]
Note: Company: F Unit: 59 Indiana Infantry. Rank In: Private Rank Out: Private National Archives Microfilm Box, Roll, and Record: 000540, 0075, 00000780 Fought for: (U = Union, C = Confederate) U
Extracted text: Jeremiah Stroud Claimed Residence in Milltown Enlist Date Enlist Place Enlist Rank Enlist Age 02 December 1861 Priv Served Indiana Enlisted F Co. 59th Inf Reg. IN disch disability on 19 August 1862

Event
Type: Pension Roll
Date: 05 JAN 1880
Place: Kansas
Note: Applied for and was awarded a pension for his service during the Civil War.
See source 2 for this person
Extracted text: Jeremiah Stroud, Cert# 402.298
Media format: jpg
Media file: Jeremiah Stroud.jpg
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [80064]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [80065]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Neosho, Kansas, Shiloh
See source 3 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0391, Page Number 269A
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Jeramiah STROUD Self M Male W 37 IN Farmer --- --- Martha STROUD Wife M Female W 36 IN Keeping House TN TN Alla S. STROUD Dau S Female W 9 IN At School IN IN Aroma M. STROUD Dau S Female W 7 IN At School IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [80082]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [80083]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [80084]

Notes for the family of Jeremiah Stroud and Martha A. Vance:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C page 171Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by Elisha Jones, MG.

Sources for Jeremiah Stroud:

Source 1
Title: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 59th Infantry Reg’t, Indiana
Extracted Text: Regimental History Fifty-ninth Infantry INDIANA (3-YEARS)

Fifty-ninth Infantry. -- Cols., Jesse I. Alexander, Jefferson K. Scott, Thomas A. McNaught; Lieut.-Cols., Jefferson K. Scott, Thomas A. McNaught, Edward J. McBride; Majs., Elijah Sabin, Thomas A. McNaught, Edward J. McBride, John E. Simpson.

This regiment was organized at Gosport in the fall and winter of 1861 and was mustered in Feb. 11 1862. It left the state Feb. 18, and proceeded to Commerce, Mo., being the first regiment to report to Gen. Pope for duty with the Army of the Mississippi.

It moved to Benton and thence to New Madrid, participating in the siege of that place and being one of the first regiments to enter the town and take possession of Fort Thompson. It then marched for Tiptonville and assisted in the capture of over 5,000 prisoners.

It embarked for Fort Pillow April 12, returning on the 17th, and then proceeded to Hamburg, Tenn. Gen. Buford was assigned to the command of the brigade to which the 59th was attached.

The regiment was engaged from April 24 to May 29 in the movements connected with the march to and siege of Corinth, and then joined in the pursuit of the enemy to Booneville, Miss. Returning to Clear Creek near Corinth June 13, it remained until Aug. 6 and then removed to Jacinto where it remained until Sept. 7.

It then moved to Rienzi where it was joined by 250 recruits from Indiana. It was engaged in the battle of Corinth in October and pursued Gen. Price to the Hatchie River, after which it moved successively to Grand Junction, Davis’ Mills, Moscow, Oxford, and Lumpkins’ Mill.

On Dec. 26, it started for Memphis as escort for the commissary train, then returned to LaFayette and back to Memphis, where it went into camp and remained until Mar. 1, 1863. I t then moved to Helena, Ark., and embarked Mar. 12 on the Yazoo River expedition.

It then took up the march for Vicksburg and reached Port Gibson just as the battle closed. With the 1st brigade, 7th division, 17th army corps, it was engaged at Forty Hills, Raymond and Champion’s Hill. Its skirmishers were the first to enter Jackson and its flag the one to float over the capitol dome.

It formed the rear-guard for the 17th corps at the Big Black River and was the last regiment to cross and then destroy the bridges. It served in the trenches at Vicksburg, joining in the assault of May 22 with heavy losses, 126 being killed or wounded. It marched into Vicksburg July 4 and remained there until Aug. 5, when it moved for Helena.

On Sept. 28 it reembarked for Memphis and then moved to Glendale, where it remained until Oct. 17. It marched for Chattanooga, took part at Missionary Ridge, and went into camp at Bridgeport, Ala., where it was transferred to the 3rd division of the 15th army corps. It was in camp at Huntsville from Dec. 26, 1863, until Mar. 3, 1864, when it proceeded to Indiana on furlough having reenlisted as a veteran organization on Jan. 1.

It returned to Huntsville Apr. 3 and remained there until June 22, when it left to join Sherman’s army. It reached Kingston, GA, July 1, and guarded the bridge over the Etowah River until Aug. 26. It was then ordered to Chattanooga and marched from there in pursuit of Wheeler’s cavalry.

It moved to Tullahoma Sept. 1, returning on the 21st, and escorted a wagon train as far as Cartersville, Ga. It was again at the Etowah River from Sept. 28 to Nov. 12, when it proceeded to Atlanta and accompanied the army to Savannah.

It marched through the Carolinas to Raleigh, thence to Washington City, where it participated in the grand review; was then transferred to Louisville and mustered out July 17, 1865. During its term of service the regiment traveled 3,756 miles by rail, 4,618 miles by water, and 5,305 miles on foot.

The original strength was 721; gain by recruits, 1,195; reenlistments, 240; total, 2,156. Loss by death, 221; desertion, 32; unaccounted for, 158.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 3

Battles Fought:

Battle at Tullahoma, Tennessee Battle on 29 May 1862 Battle at Iuka, Mississippi on 19 September 1862 Battle at Champion Hills, Mississippi on 16 May 1863 Battle at Vicksburg, Mississippi on 22 May 1863 Battle at Vicksburg, Mississippi on 27 May 1863 Battle on 03 March 1865 Battle at Darlington, South Carolina on 03 March 1865
ABBR: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 59th Infantry Reg’t, Indiana
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: Pension records
ABBR: Pension records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 3
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Jeremiah Stroud and Martha A. Vance:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Celestia A. _____:

Event
Type: Pension Roll
Date: 19 NOV 1920
Place: Kansas
Note: Applied for and was awarded a widows pension for Jeremiah’s service during the Civil War.
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Celestia A. , Cert# 904669
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Media format: jpg
Media file: Jeremiah Stroud.jpg
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [767524]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [767525]

Sources for Celestia A. _____:

Source 1
Title: Pension records
ABBR: Pension records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

99. 6John Riley Stroud, son of 5Rev. Annual Stroud MG [29] and Elizabeth B. Larrance. Born on 13 Oct. 1845 in Crawford, Indiana. Died in 1931 in Marengo, Crawford, Indiana, USA, 85 or 86 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs.

Married Rachel P. Purkhiser, dau. of Elijah Purkhiser and Rachel Moon (dau. of George Moon and Sarah Hobson), on 21 Feb. 1870 in Orange when 24 years old (Rachel P. was 24 years old). Rachel P. Purkhiser b. in April 1845 in Indiana; d. after 1931, at least 86 years old.

Issue of John Riley Stroud and Rachel P. Purkhiser:

188   i. dau. 7Nora M. Stroud b. in Dec. 1870 in Indiana.
      ii. dau. Cora A. Stroud b. about 1875.
      iii. son William T. Stroud b. in 1876 in Indiana; d. in 1903 in Indiana, 26 or 27 years old; bur. in Crawford.
189   iv. son George Sanford Stroud b. on 1 Sep. 1878 in Marengo.
190   v. son James G. Stroud b. on 18 May 1880 in Crawford.

Notes on John Riley Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3335@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs, Old Town) Cemetery, Marengo [80104]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0271, Page Number 401B
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: John R. STROUD Self M Male W 34 IN Farmer IN IN Rachael P. STROUD Wife M Female W 34 IN Keeping House OH IN Nora M. STROUD Dau S Female W 9 IN IN IN Cora A. STROUD Dau S Female W 5 IN IN IN William T. STROUD Son S Male W 3 IN IN IN George S. STROUD Son S Male W 1 IN IN IN James G. STROUD Son S Male W 1M IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [80126]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [80127]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [80128]

Census
Date: 1910
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): Page 1 line 131
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Stroud, John R., age 64, m 40 yrs , Rachel P., wife, age 64, m 40 yrs, 7 born 3 living

Notes for the family of John Riley Stroud and Rachel P. Purkhiser:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C-5-15Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceMarriageNote: Record C-6 15

Sources for John Riley Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1910 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, actual images of the 1910 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, T624, 1784 rolls may be browsed by selecting a state, county, township, and enumeration district.
Enumerators of the 1910 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; relationship to head of family; age at last birthday; sex; color or race; whether single, married, widowed, or divorced; number of years of present marriage; number of children born; number of children now living; birthplace; mother tongue; birthplace of father and mother; mother tongue of father and mother; year of immigration to the U.S.; whether naturalized or alien; whether able to speak English, or if not, give language spoken; trade or profession; industry; whether employer, employee, or working on own account; if an employee, whether out of work on April 15, 1910; if an employee, number of weeks out of work during year 1909, whether able to read; whether able to write; attended school any time since September 1, 1909; home owned or rented; home owned free or mortgaged; farm or house; number of farm schedule; whether a survivor of the Union or Confederate Army or Navy; whether blind; whether deaf and dumb. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1910 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of John Riley Stroud and Rachel P. Purkhiser:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Rachel P. Purkhiser:

Last name may have been Purkhiser!

100. 6Malinda Jane Stroud, dau. of 5Rev. Annual Stroud MG [29] and Elizabeth B. Larrance. Born on 25 Oct. 1848 in Crawford, Indiana.

Married Charles William Allen on 6 Oct. 1872 in Crawford when 23 years old (Charles William was 25 years old). Charles William Allen b. on 1 Oct. 1847 in Shelbyville, Shelby, Indiana; d. on 17 Sep. 1922 in Shelbyville, 74 years old.

Issue of Malinda Jane Stroud and Charles William Allen:

      i. son 7Stephen Annual Allen b. on 14 Oct. 1873 in Marengo, Crawford, Indiana, USA; m. (1) Gertrude Griffy (abt. 1876–1943), dau. of William Ashbury Griffy and Lucy Remington, on 28 Nov. 1906 when 33 years old (Gertrude was about 30 years old); m. (2) 7Etta (Stroud) Cantrall (12 March 1875 in Marengo–bef. 1880), dau. of 6Thomas Landine Stroud [101] and Margaret Radcliff, on 2 July 1946 in Crawford when 72 years old (Etta was 71 years old).
      ii. dau. Zoradia Elizabeth Allen b. on 5 Dec. 1875 in Marengo; m. Dauves? Thompson.
      iii. son Leslie Van Pelt Allen b. on 15 Nov. 1883; m. Lydia Koch.
191   iv. dau. Sarah Emily Allen b. on 5 July 1886 in Marengo.
      v. son Caddy Clifford Allen b. on 9 June 1893 in Marengo; m. Hulda Kemps.

Notes on Charles William Allen:

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0270, Page Number 277D
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Charles W. ALLEN Self M Male W 33 IN Farmer KY KY Malinda J. ALLEN Wife M Female W 32 IN Keeping House --- --- Stephen A. ALLEN Son S Male W 6 IN IN IN Zoradia E. ALLEN Dau S Female W 5 IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [84059]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [84060]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [84061]

Notes for the family of Charles William Allen and Malinda Jane Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C page 632Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by J. M. Johnson, MG

Sources for Charles William Allen:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Charles William Allen and Malinda Jane Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

101. 6Thomas Landine Stroud, son of 5Rev. Annual Stroud MG [29] and Elizabeth B. Larrance. Born on 27 Sep. 1854 in Marengo, Crawford, Indiana, USA.

Married Margaret Radcliff. Margaret Radcliff b. in 1856 in Hardinsburg, Washington, Indiana.

Issue of Thomas Landine Stroud and Margaret Radcliff:

      i. dau. 7Etta Stroud b. on 12 March 1875 in Marengo; d. before 1880, at most four years old; m. (1) _____ Cantrall (–1945); m. (2) 7Stephen Annual Allen (14 Oct. 1873 in Marengo–), son of Charles William Allen and 6Malinda Jane Stroud [100], on 2 July 1946 in Crawford, Indiana when 71 years old (Stephen Annual was 72 years old).
      ii. dau. Mary E. Stroud b. about 1877.
      iii. son Joseph S. Stroud b. about 1879.

Notes on Thomas Landine Stroud:

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film T9-0270, Page 278A
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Thomas L., Self, M, M, W, 20, Indiana Margret, Wife, F, M, W, 24, Indiana Mary E, Dau, F, S, W, 3, Indiana Joseph S., Son, M, S, W, 1, Indiana
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [80201]

(Research):Age does not correclate to census.

Sources for Thomas Landine Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of 5Annanias Stroud [30] (4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Mariah Bullington

102. 6William Stroud, son of 5Annanias Stroud [30] and Mariah Bullington. Born on 30 Oct. 1835 in Crawford, Indiana. Died on 27 Oct. 1921 in Crawford, 85 years old.

Married Marva Gouldman on 11 Nov. 1856 in Orange when 21 years old.

Issue of William Stroud and Marva Gouldman:

      i. son 7Silas C. Stroud b. about 1857 in Orange.
      ii. son Housten W. Stroud b. in 1860 in Orange.

Notes on William Stroud:

Census
Date: 1860
Place: , Orange, Indiana
Note: census, page 569

Notes for the family of William Stroud and Marva Gouldman:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C-4-141Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceMarriageNote: Record C-4 141

Sources for the family of William Stroud and Marva Gouldman:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

103. 6Silas D. Stroud, son of 5Annanias Stroud [30] and Mariah Bullington. Born in 1838 in Indiana. Died in 1895 in Indiana, 56 or 57 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs.

Married Lydia M. Cornwell on 13 May 1858 in Orange when 19 or 20 years old (Lydia M. was 17 or 18 years old). Lydia M. Cornwell b. in 1840 in Indiana.

Issue of Silas D. Stroud and Lydia M. Cornwell:

192   i. dau. 7Louise Jane Stroud b. about 1859 in Orange.
193   ii. son John Thomas Stroud b. on 20 April 1861 in Orange.
194   iii. son James William Stroud b. in 1861 in Orange.
195   iv. dau. Sarah Ann Stroud b. on 22 Nov. 1867 in Indiana.
196   v. dau. Caroline R. Stroud b. about 1874 in Indiana.

Notes on Silas D. Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3516@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs, Old Town) Cemetery, Marengo [84114]

Census
Date: 1860
Place: , Orange, Indiana
Note: census, Southeast Township, page 569.

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 23 Line 167
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0302, Page Number 97A
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Silas STROUD Self M Male W 43 IN Farming IN IN Lydia STROUD Wife M Female W 40 IN Keeping House KY IN James W. STROUD Son S Male W 19 IN Farm Hand IN IN Sarah A. STROUD Dau S Female W 12 IN Asst. House K. IN IN Carrie A. STROUD Dau S Female W 6 IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [84143]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [84144]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [84145]

Media link
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 2 _SCBK Y [84153]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 2 _PRIM Y [84154]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 2 _TYPE PHOTO [84155]

Notes for the family of Silas D. Stroud and Lydia M. Cornwell:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C-4-225Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceMarriageNote: Record C-4 225Census: 1860Date: 1860Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast TownshipNote: 0283-0283 Stroud, Silas D. 23 M W Farmer $500 IN Stroud, Lydia 19 F W IN Stroud, Louisa 1 F W IN Stroud, John L. 4 m M W IN

Sources for Silas D. Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Silas D. Stroud and Lydia M. Cornwell:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

104. 6John Calvin Stroud, son of 5Annanias Stroud [30] and Mariah Bullington. Born in July 1840. Died in 1917 in Orange, Indiana, 76 or 77 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs.

Married Louisa Jane Cornwell on 1 Aug. 1861 in Orange when 21 years old (Louisa Jane was 17 or 18 years old). Louisa Jane Cornwell b. in 1843 in Indiana.

Issue of John Calvin Stroud and Louisa Jane Cornwell:

      i. son 7William Bennett Stroud b. about 1862 in Orange; d. on 11 Oct. 1923 in Orange, about 61 years old; bur. in Crawford.
197   ii. son Tolbert G. Stroud b. about 1865 in Orange.
198   iii. dau. Elsey Rolla Stroud b. in 1865 in Orange.
199   iv. dau. Cloe Armelia Stroud b. in Feb. 1869 in Orange.
200   v. son Virgil Beechen Stroud b. on 7 Sep. 1873 in Orange.
201   vi. son Charles H. Stroud b. on 24 Jan. 1878 in Orange.

Notes on John Calvin Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3517@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs, Old Town) Cemetery, Marengo [84169]

Census
Date: 1850
Place: , Orange, Indiana
Note: census would indicate birthyear of about 1841.

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 23 Line 168
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0302, Page Number 96D
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: John C. STROUD Self M Male W 39 IN Farming IN IN Louisa STROUD Wife M Female W 37 IN House Keeping KY KY William B. STROUD Son S Male W 18 IN Farm Hand IN IN Tolbert C. STROUD Son S Male W 15 IN Farm Hand IN IN Cloey A. STROUD Dau S Female W 13 IN Asst. House K. IN IN Virgil B. STROUD Son S Male W 6 IN IN IN Charles H. STROUD Son S Male W 2 IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [84201]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [84202]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [84203]

Census
Date: 1900
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township

Notes for the family of John Calvin Stroud and Louisa Jane Cornwell:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C-4-427Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceMarriageNote: Record C-4 427

Sources for John Calvin Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of John Calvin Stroud and Louisa Jane Cornwell:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

105. 6Martha T. Stroud, dau. of 5Annanias Stroud [30] and Mariah Bullington. Born about 1843.

Married Charles W. Deremiah on 4 March 1886 in Orange, Indiana when about 43 years old (Charles W. was 46 or 47 years old). Charles W. Deremiah b. in 1839 in Indiana.

Issue of Martha T. Stroud and Charles W. Deremiah:

      i. son 7Benjamin D. Deremiah b. in 1867 in Indiana.
      ii. dau. Laura A. Deremiah b. in 1871 in Indiana.
      iii. dau. Elsena Deremiah b. in 1877 in Indiana.

Notes on Charles W. Deremiah:

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0302, Page Number 90C
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Chas. W. DEREMIAH Self M Male W 41 IN Farmer IN IN Martha J. DEREMIAH Wife M Female W 36 IN House Keeping VA IN Benjamin D. DEREMIAH Son S Male W 13 IN Farm Hand IN IN Laura A. DEREMIAH Dau S Female W 9 IN IN IN Elsena DEREMIAH Dau S Female W 3 IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [84486]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [84487]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [84488]

Notes for the family of Charles W. Deremiah and Martha T. Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C-5-253Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceMarriageNote: Record C-5 253

Sources for Charles W. Deremiah:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Charles W. Deremiah and Martha T. Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

106. 6Malinda H. Stroud, dau. of 5Annanias Stroud [30] and Mariah Bullington. Born about 1845 in Indiana.

Married John H. Freeman on 25 Nov. 1866 in Orange when about 21 years old (John H. was 24 or 25 years old). John H. Freeman b. in 1841 in Indiana.

Issue of Malinda H. Stroud and John H. Freeman:

      i. son 7Sherman A. Freeman b. in 1868 in Indiana.
202   ii. dau. Amanda Emma Freeman b. on 19 Sep. 1869 in Orange.
      iii. son Norman W. Freeman b. in 1874 in Indiana.
      iv. dau. Hettie E. Freeman b. in 1876 in Indiana.
      v. son John E. Freeman b. in 1879 in Indiana.

Notes on John H. Freeman:

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0302, Page Number 91A
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: John H. FREEMAN Self M Male W 39 IN Farming NC NC Malinda H. FREEMAN Wife M Female W 35 IN House Keeping IN IN Sherman A. FREEMAN Son S Male W 12 IN Farm Hand IN IN Amanda E. FREEMAN Dau S Female W 10 IN Asst. House K. IN IN Norman W. FREEMAN Son S Male W 6 IN IN IN Hettie E. FREEMAN Dau S Female W 4 IN IN IN John E. FREEMAN Son S Male W 1 IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [84452]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [84453]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [84454]

Notes for the family of John H. Freeman and Malinda H. Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C-5-312Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceMarriageNote: Record C-5 312

Sources for John H. Freeman:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of John H. Freeman and Malinda H. Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

107. 6Eliza Caroline Stroud, dau. of 5Annanias Stroud [30] and Mariah Bullington. Born on 4 May 1854 in Crawford, Indiana. Died on 14 March 1936 in Washington, Daviess, Indiana, 81 years old.

Married Frank W. Lockhart, son of James Alexander Lockhart and Emily J. Burton, on 3 Nov. 1872 in Orange when 18 years old (Frank W. was 19 years old). Frank W. Lockhart b. on 12 Oct. 1853 in Orange; d. on 9 Feb. 1884, 30 years old; bur. in Orange, Indiana, Bluff Springs Cemetery.

Issue of Eliza Caroline Stroud and Frank W. Lockhart:

      i. dau. 7Josphine Lockhart b. about 1874; d. before 1900.
      ii. dau. Dora L. Lockhart b. on 30 Jan. 1876.
      iii. dau. Emma Emily Lockhart b. on 16 March 1878; d. on 1 Feb. 1884, five years old.
      iv. son James Willard Lockhart b. on 5 Feb. 1880.
203   v. dau. Martha Mariah Lockhart b. on 15 Jan. 1884.

Notes on Frank W. Lockhart:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3527@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Orange, Indiana, Bluff Springs Cemetery, Southeast Township, Valeene, Section 15 T1s R1e [84390]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0302, Page Number 91A
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Frank W. LOCKHART Self M Male W 25 IN Farmer IN IN Eliza C. LOCKHART Wife M Female W 25 IN House Keeper IN IN Josephine LOCKHART Dau S Female W 6 IN IN IN Dora L. LOCKHART Dau S Female W 4 IN IN IN Emily J. LOCKHART Dau S Female W 2 IN IN IN James W. LOCKHART Son S Male W 4M IN IN IN William M. LOCKHART Cousin S Male W 18 IN Farm Hand IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [84413]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [84414]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [84415]

Notes for the family of Frank W. Lockhart and Eliza Caroline Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C-6, page 172Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Sources for Frank W. Lockhart:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Frank W. Lockhart and Eliza Caroline Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

108. 6Beechem Stroud, son of 5Annanias Stroud [30] and Mariah Bullington. Born on 25 Sep. 1855 in Orange, Indiana. Died on 11 Jan. 1938 in Palmyra, Harrison, Indiana, 82 years old. Buried in Harrison, Indiana, Palmyra Cemetery.

Married Matilda A. Holtzclaw on 20 Nov. 1879 when 24 years old (Matilda A. was 17 or 18 years old). Matilda A. Holtzclaw b. in 1861 in Indiana.

Issue of Beechem Stroud and Matilda A. Holtzclaw:

204   i. son 7Alonzo Claude Stroud b. in Aug. 1880 in Indiana.

Notes on Beechem Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3522@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Harrison, Indiana, Palmyra Cemetery, Palmyra [84284]

Census
Date: 1870
Note: Census Would Indicate Birthyear Of About 1857

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0302, Page Number 97A
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Buchem STROUD Self M Male W 24 IN Farming IN IN Tilda A. STROUD Wife M Female W 18 IN Keeping House IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [84300]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [84301]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [84302]

Census
Date: 1900
Place: , Orange, Indiana
Note: census, Southeast Township, 57-113/11-12

Census
Date: 1920
Place: , Harrison, Indiana
Note: Blue River Township, p 7.census, 27-87/1-13

Sources for Beechem Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

109. 6Lovey Stroud, dau. of 5Annanias Stroud [30] and Mariah Bullington. Born about 1859 in Orange, Indiana. Died on 29 Dec. 1937, about 78 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs.

Married first _____ Radcliff.

Issue of Lovey Stroud and _____ Radcliff:

205   i. son 7Herbert Thaddeus Stroud b. on 26 Oct. 1881 in Orange.

Married second Andrew Jackson Wells, son of Samuel A. Wells (son of Jesse Wells and Margaret Moore) and Margaret Pirtle, on 8 Oct. 1886 when about 27 years old (Andrew Jackson was 23 years old). Andrew Jackson Wells b. on 20 May 1863 in Orange; d. on 11 May 1947 in Valeene, Orange, Indiana, 83 years old; bur. in Crawford.

Issue of Lovey Stroud and Andrew Jackson Wells:

      ii. dau. 7Ethel Wells b. in 1884; d. in 1896, eleven or twelve years old.
      iii. son John Ernest Wells b. on 28 Aug. 1887.
      iv. dau. Maude Mae Wells b. in 1890; d. on 23 April 1975, 84 or 85 years old; bur. in Crawford; m. _____ Dinkelacker.
      v. child Infant Wells b. in 1891; d. in 1891, an infant.
      vi. child Infant Wells b. in 1893; d. in 1893, an infant.
      vii. dau. Amanda Myrtle Wells b. on 20 May 1894; d. on 2 Nov. 1965, 71 years old; bur. in Boone, Kentucky, Burlington Cemetery; m. _____ Edwards.
      viii. dau. Nella Ruth Wells b. on 3 Nov. 1897; d. on 27 July 1969, 71 years old.

Notes on Lovey Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3523@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs, Old Town) Cemetery, Marengo [84328]

Notes on Andrew Jackson Wells:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3525@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs, Old Town) Cemetery, Marengo [84358]


Issue of 5Riley Stroud [31] (4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Nancy Jones

110. 6Aniel Stroud, son of 5Riley Stroud [31] and Nancy Jones. Born in Feb. 1842 in Crawford, Indiana.

Married first Rebecca Denton on 16 Aug. 1860 in Orange when 18 years old. Divorced.

Married second Cynthia Ann Denton on 31 Jan. 1867 in Orange when 24 years old.

Issue of Aniel Stroud and Cynthia Ann Denton:

206   i. dau. 7Gertrude Stroud b. in Aug. 1889 in Crawford.
      ii. son Raymond Stroud b. in July 1893 in Crawford.

Married third Anna Sutton on 18 Sep. 1898 in Crawford when 56 years old (Anna was about 30 years old). Anna Sutton b. about 1868 in Indiana.

Issue of Aniel Stroud and Anna Sutton:

      iii. son 7Russell Stroud b. in Nov. 1899 in Crawford.

Notes on Aniel Stroud:

Event: - Union Army, Co. G, B, & H, 13th Indiana Infantry
Type: Military Service
Place: War (1861-1865) (Civil)
Note:
See source 1 for this person
Extracted text: Anuel Stroud (First_Last) Regiment Name 13 Indiana Infantry Side Union Company GBD Soldier’s Rank_In Pvt Soldier’s Rank_Out Pvt Alternate Name Notes Film Number M540 roll 75
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [55535]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [55536]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [55537]

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): Page 17, Line 125
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [55544]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [55545]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [55546]

Notes for the family of Aniel Stroud and Rebecca Denton:

Divorce: 30 JAN 1867Date: 30 JAN 1867See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C-4, page 366Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence!GEDCOM Child already has parents: 0 @F1318@ FAM ◊ 1 CHIL @I3789@ [1449172]

Notes for the family of Aniel Stroud and Cynthia Ann Denton:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C-5, page 357Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Notes for the family of Aniel Stroud and Anna Sutton:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book G Page 140Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Sources for Aniel Stroud:

Source 1
Title: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 13th Infantry Reg’t, Indiana
Extracted Text: Regimental History Thirteenth Infantry INDIANA (3 years)

Thirteenth Infantry. Cols., Jeremiah C. Sullivan, Robert G. Foster, Cyrus J. Dobbs, John H. Lawrence; Lieut.-Cols., Will Cumback, Horace Heffren, Robert S. Foster, Cyrus J. Dobbs, John M. Wilson, Samuel M. Zent, Majs., Robert S. Foster, Cyrus J. Dobbs, John M. Wilson, John C. Burton John H. Lawrence, Richard J. Graham.

This regiment was originally accepted for state service for one year and was organized at Indianapolis for the U. S. service by volunteers from the companies in camp. It was one of the first four regiments volunteering from the state for three years and was mustered in June 19, 1861.

It left the state July 4, and joined Gen. McClellan’s forces at Rich Mountain, W. Va., July 10 participating in the battle at that place the following day. It was in numerous skirmishes about Cheat Mountain in September, supported a battery at Green Brier in October and was in the battle of Camp Alleghany in December.

It then moved to Green Spring Run, where it remained until March, when it took part in the battle of Winchester Heights, and joined in pursuit of Jackson’s army as far as New Market. Col. Sullivan was appointed brigadier-general on May 2 and Lieut.-Col. Foster was made colonel.

The regiment was in the engagement at Summerville, and then moved in pursuit of the enemy to Luray and Alexandria. It embarked on June 28 for Harrison’s landing, where it remained from July 2 to Aug. 15, when it marched for Fortress Monroe. From there it moved to Suffolk, and engaged in reconnaissances during the fall and winter. It was in the engagement at Deserted House, and aided in the defeat of Longstreet, in his attempt to sieze Suffolk in the spring of 1863.

Col. Foster was appointed brigadier-general on June 16, and Lieut.-Col. Cyrus J. Dobbs was promoted to colonel. On June 27, the regiment joined the expedition north of Richmond and sailed for Folly island, Charleston Harbor, July 28. It
participated in the siege operations of Forts Wagner and Gregg, being the first regiment to enter Fort Wagner in the assault of Sept. 7.

Part of the regiment reenlisted as veterans in December and were furloughed home. The regiment moved to Jacksonville, Fla., in Feb., 1864, remaining there until April 17, when it was transferred to Gloucester Point, Va., and assigned to the 2nd brigade, 3rd division, 10th corps.

It participated in most of the operations of Gen. Butler’s army south of Richmond, was engaged at Port Walthal Junction, Chester Station, and in the charge on the enemy’s rifle pits, losing nearly 200 men in these engagements. It was attached to the 3rd brigade, 3rd division, 18th corps on May 26, and joined the Army of the Potomac at Cold Harbor June 1.

After the battle of Cold Harbor it participated in the early assaults on the works at Petersburg. The non-veterans left for Indianapolis on June 19, and were mustered out on the 24th. The regiment engaged in the charge at the Crater, July 30, and was in the trenches before Petersburg until September.

It was in the battles of Strawberry Plains, at Chaffin’s Bluff and Fort Gilmer and in the attack on Richmond in October. It was sent to New York during the election in November, and joined the first expedition to Fort Fisher in December, returning to Chaffin’s Bluff on the 31st.

The veterans and recruits were reorganized into a battalion of five companies on Dec. 6 and five companies of drafted men were added later, making a full regiment. It participated in the assault on Fort Fisher in Jan. 1865 in the capture of Fort Anderson and the occupation of Wilmington, and was stationed at Raleigh, until July 20, when it was assigned to duty at Goldsboro, where it remained until mustered out, Sept. 5, 1865.

The original strength of the regiment was 1,047. Gain by recruits, 192; reenlistments, 148; unassigned recruits, 40, total, 1,427. Loss by death 136; desertion, 103; unaccounted for 25. At its reorganization, the original strength was 980. Gain by recruits, 166; total 1,146. Loss by death, 98; desertion, 1; unaccounted for 30.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 3

Battles Fought:

Battle at Bermuda Hundred, Virginia Battle at Bolton Church, Virginia Battle at Hampton, Virginia Battle at Rich Mountain, West Virginia on 11 July 1861 Battle at Cheat Mountain, West Virginia on 15 September 1861 Battle at Green Briar River, West Virginia on 03 October 1861 Battle at Allegheny, West Virginia on 13 December 1861 Battle at Winchester, Virginia on 23 March 1862 Battle on 03 May 1862 Battle on 03 October 1862 Battle at Blackwater, Virginia on 12 December 1862 Battle at Chester Station, Virginia on 10 May 1864 Battle at Foster’s Farm, Virginia on 19 May 1864 Battle at Foster’s Farm, Virginia on 20 May 1864 Battle at Weir Bottom Church, Virginia on 20 May 1864 Battle at Cold Harbor, Virginia on 01 June 1864 Battle at Petersburg, Virginia on 29 June 1864 Battle at Petersburg, Virginia on 30 June 1864 Battle at Petersburg, Virginia on 01 July 1864 Battle at Petersburg, Virginia on 06 July 1864 Battle at Petersburg, Virginia on 30 July 1864 Battle at Deep Bottom, Virginia on 16 August 1864 Battle at Petersburg, Virginia on 15 September 1864 Battle at Fort Fisher, North Carolina on 15 January 1865 Battle at Fort Fisher, North Carolina on 16 January 1865 Battle at Sugar Loaf Hill, North Carolina on 11 February 1865 Battle at Kinston, North Carolina on 15 April 1865
ABBR: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 13th Infantry Reg’t, Indiana
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Aniel Stroud and Rebecca Denton:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Aniel Stroud and Cynthia Ann Denton:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Aniel Stroud and Anna Sutton:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Rebecca Denton:

(Research):In the 1850 census a Rebecca Denton is found as a 9 year old child in the home of Thomas Denton age 30 and Fannie his wife age 31 along with Joel age 7, Isom age 5, Cynthia age 3, Liza age 9 months.

111. 6Elisha Hatfield Stroud, son of 5Riley Stroud [31] and Nancy Jones. Born in July 1866 in Crawford, Indiana.

Married first Cynthia Elizabeth Jones on 15 Oct. 1885 in Orange when 19 years old (Cynthia Elizabeth was 17 years old). Cynthia Elizabeth Jones b. in Feb. 1868 in Orange; d. in 1912, 43 or 44 years old.

Issue of Elisha Hatfield Stroud and Cynthia Elizabeth Jones:

207   i. son 7Emery Otto Stroud b. on 13 Sep. 1886 in Crawford.
208   ii. dau. Lula Stroud b. on 3 Sep. 1888 in Crawford.
      iii. dau. Hattie Stroud b. on 8 June 1892; d. in Feb. 1981 in Marengo, Crawford, Indiana, USA, 88 years old; m. _____ Ellingsworth.
209   iv. son Leslie Elvis Stroud b. on 1 March 1898 in Crawford.
      v. son Floyd Stroud b. on 7 July 1902 in Marengo; m. Mary Bowman (16 Aug. 1913 in Valeene, Orange, Indiana–), dau. of Sherman Bowman and Nan Pierson, on 25 June 1935 in Orange when 32 years old (Mary was 21 years old).
210   vi. dau. Lilie Mae Stroud b. on 3 Sep. 1904 in Crawford.
      vii. son Herschel Stroud b. about 1908.

Married second Sallie Cornwell, dau. of John Cornwell and Rachel Denton, on 7 Oct. 1924 in Crawford when 58 years old (Sallie was 43 years old). Sallie Cornwell b. on 21 Nov. 1880 in Orange.

Notes on Elisha Hatfield Stroud:

Census
Date: 1900
Place: , Crawford, Indiana
Note: census, Liberty Township, 12-27/9-1

Census
Date: 01 JAN 1920
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Roll: T625_426, Page: 14A, Line 325
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Stroud, Eliah H., head, age 54 , Hattie, daughter, age 27 , Lesley, son, age 21 , Floyd, son, age 17 , Tillie, daughter, age 15 , Herschel, son, age 12
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [90512]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [90513]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [90514]

Listed as son of Aniel STROUD and Rebecca DENTON per IGI. “Eli” is listed as grandson of Riley STROUD in the 1880 census

Notes for the family of Elisha Hatfield Stroud and Cynthia Elizabeth Jones:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C-7-507Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceMarriageNote: Record C-7 507

Notes for the family of Elisha Hatfield Stroud and Sallie Cornwell:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book L page 546Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by Leonard Cummins, MG.

Sources for Elisha Hatfield Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1920 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1920 Census was begun on 1 January 1920. The following questions were asked by enumerators: Name of street, avenue road, etc.; house number or farm; number of dwelling in order of visitation; number of family in order of visitation; name of each person whose place of abode was with the family; relationship of person enumerated to the head of the family; whether home owned or rented; if owned, whether free or mortgaged; sex; color or race; age at last birthday; whether single, married, widowed, or divorced; year of immigration to United States; whether naturalized or alien; if naturalized, year of naturalization; whether attended school any time since 1 September 1919; whether able to read; whether able to write; person’s place of birth; mother tongue; father’s place of birth; father’s mother tongue; mother’s place of birth; mother’s mother tongue; whether able to speak English; trade, profession, or particular kind of work done; industry, business, or establishment in which at work; whether employer, salary or wage worker, or working on own account; number of farm schedule.
The date of the enumeration appears on the heading of each page of the census schedule. All responses were to reflect the individual’s status as of 1 January 1920, even if the status had changed between 1 January and the day of enumeration. Children born between 1 January and the day of enumeration were not to be listed, while individuals alive on 1 January but deceased when the enumerator arrived were to be counted.
Unlike the 1910 census, the 1920 census did not have questions regarding unemployment, Union or Confederate military service, number of children, or duration of marriage. It did, however, include four new question columns: one asked the year of naturalization and three inquired about mother tongue. The 1920 census also asked the year of arrival and status of every foreign-born person and inquired about the year of naturalization for those individuals who had become U.S. citizens. In 1920 the census included, for the first time, Guam, American Samoa, and the Panama Canal Zone.
Due to boundary modifications in Europe resulting from World War I, some individuals were uncertain about how to identify their national origin. Enumerators were instructed to spell out the name of the city, state, province, or region of respondents who declared that they or their parents had been born in Germany, Austria-Hungary, Russia, or Turkey. Interpretation of the birthplace varied from one enumerator to another. Some failed to identify specific birthplaces within those named countries, and others provided an exact birthplace in countries not designated in the instructions.
There are no separate Indian population schedules in the 1920 census. Inhabitants of reservations were enumerated in the general population schedules. Enumerators were instructed not to report servicemen in the family enumerations but to treat them as residents of their duty posts. The 1920 census includes schedules for overseas military and naval forces.
The original 1920 census schedules were destroyed by authorization of the Eighty-third Congress, so it is not possible to consult originals when microfilm copies prove unreadable.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1920 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Elisha Hatfield Stroud and Cynthia Elizabeth Jones:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Elisha Hatfield Stroud and Sallie Cornwell:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of Alexander Barnett and 5Sarah J. Stroud [32] (4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1])

112. 6Stephen Barnett, son of Alexander Barnett and 5Sarah J. Stroud [32]. Born on 27 Nov. 1837. Died before 1880, at most 42 years old.

Married Elizabeth Emmons. Elizabeth Emmons b. in 1835 in Kentucky.

Issue of Stephen Barnett and Elizabeth Emmons:

211   i. son 7Lafayette Barnett b. about 1853 in Indiana.
      ii. son Phillip B. Barnett b. in 1857 in Indiana; d. in 1889 in English, Crawford, Indiana, 31 or 32 years old; m. Eliza A. Franks (1861 in Indiana–) in Crawford.
      iii. son John W. Barnett b. about 1859.
      iv. dau. Jane L. Barnett b. about 1862.
      v. son Steven A. D. Barnett b. about 1865.
      vi. dau. Sarah Elizabeth Barnett b. about 1868.
212   vii. son William Henry H. Barnett b. in 1871 in Crawford.
213   viii. son George W. Barnett b. in Jan. 1873 in Indiana.

Notes on Stephen Barnett:

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township

Notes on Elizabeth Emmons:

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0271, Page Number 384D
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Elizabeth BARNETT Self W Female W 46 KY Keeping House VA KY Jinnie L. BARNETT Dau S Female W 17 IN TN KY Steaven A. BARNETT Son Male W 14 IN TN KY Sarah E. BARNETT Dau S Female W 12 IN TN KY Wm. H. H. BARNETT Son S Male W 9 IN TN KY George W. BARNETT Son S Male W 7 IN TN KY
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [84579]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [84580]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [84581]

Sources for Elizabeth Emmons:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of 5John Stroud [33] (4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Martha Bobbitt

113. 6James L. Stroud, son of 5John Stroud [33] and Martha Bobbitt. Born about 1849 in Orange, Indiana.

Married Lucinda Longest, dau. of James Longest and Sarah _____, on 9 Nov. 1870 in Crawford when about 21 years old (Lucinda was about 23 years old). Lucinda Longest b. about 1847 in Indiana.

Issue of James L. Stroud and Lucinda Longest:

      i. dau. 7Martha Stroud b. about 1867 in Indiana.
      ii. dau. Ruda A. Stroud b. about 1876 in Indiana.
      iii. son John B. Stroud b. on 2 Oct. 1879 in Orange; m. Dora M. Jenkins (26 Jan. 1889 in Crawford–), dau. of Lafayette Jenkins and Nancy Wood, on 12 Sep. 1907 in Crawford when 27 years old (Dora M. was 18 years old).

Notes on James L. Stroud:

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Patoka Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0271, Page Number 365B
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Jas. L. STROUD Self M Male W 31 IN Farmer IN ALA Lucinda STROUD Wife M Female W 33 IN Keeping House IN IN Martha E. STROUD Dau S Female W 13 IN At Home IN IN Ruda A. STROUD Dau S Female W 4 IN IN IN John B. STROUD Son S Male W 8M IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [84684]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [84685]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [84686]

Notes for the family of James L. Stroud and Lucinda Longest:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C page 530Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by J. McMickle, JP.MarriageNote: On his application for marriage James Stroud listed his mothers maiden name as “Moss”. Was it Moss and she had been previously married to a Longest or vice versa.

Sources for James L. Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of James L. Stroud and Lucinda Longest:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Lucinda Longest:

(Research):James and Sarah may not have been the parents of Lucinda as the 1850 census lists six children but no Lucinda. No child listed waas born in 1847!

114. 6Surrepta A. Stroud, dau. of 5John Stroud [33] and Martha Bobbitt. Born in 1858 in Valeene, Orange, Indiana.

Married Daniel Kimes on 17 Nov. 1880 in Crawford, Indiana when 21 or 22 years old.

Issue of Surrepta A. Stroud and Daniel Kimes:

      i. dau. 7Son Kimes .
      ii. dau. Dau Kimes d. about 1922; m. Richard Dunn (abt. 1984–).

Notes on Daniel Kimes:

Notes for the family of Daniel Kimes and Surrepta A. Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book E page 50Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by Walter Scott, MG

Sources for the family of Daniel Kimes and Surrepta A. Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

115. 6William Isham Stroud, son of 5John Stroud [33] and Martha Bobbitt. Born in May 1850 in Indiana.

Married Nancy Elizabeth Barringer, dau. of Charles Barringer and Margaret _____, on 18 Nov. 1881 in Crawford when 31 years old (Nancy Elizabeth was about 25 years old). Nancy Elizabeth Barringer b. in Nov. 1856 in Indiana.

Issue of William Isham Stroud and Nancy Elizabeth Barringer:

      i. son 7Stewart E. Stroud b. in Dec. 1885 in Indiana; m. Pearl Tichenor (abt. 1891 in Kentucky–).
      ii. son John O. Stroud b. in Oct. 1886 in Indiana.
214   iii. son Von Loyd Stroud b. on 4 May 1891 in Birdseye, Dubois, Indiana, USA.
      iv. son Reuben Willis Stroud b. on 30 April 1893 in Leavenworth, Crawford, Indiana; m. Vogena Dewitt in 1922 in Crawford when 28 or 29 years old.

Notes on William Isham Stroud:

Census
Date: 1900
Place: , Dubois, Indiana, Jefferson Township
See source 1 for this person
Extracted text: Stroud, Isham, age 50, born May 1850 in Indiana, married 18 years , Nancy E., wife, age 43, born Nov 1856 in Indiana, married 18 years, 6 born 4 living , Stewart E., son, age 14, born Dec 1885 in Indiana , John O., son, age 13, born Oct 1886 in Indiana . Von L., son, age 9, born May 1891 in Indiana , Reuben W., son, age 7, born April 1893 in Indiana
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [262215]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [262216]

Census
Date: 1910
Place: , Dubois, Indiana, Jefferson Township
See source 2 for this person
Extracted text: Stroud, William I., age 55, born Indiana, married 28 years , Nancy E., wife, age 47, born Indiana , Von L., son, age 18, born Indiana , Reuben, son, age 16, born Indiana
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [262227]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [262228]

Sources for William Isham Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1900 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database is an index to all individuals enumerated in the 1900 United States Federal Census, the Twelfth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1900 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, T623, 1854 rolls. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1900 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; address; relationship to the head of household; color or race; sex; month and year of birth; age at last birthday; marital status; number of years married; the total number of children born of the mother; the number of those children living; places of birth of each individual and the parents of each individual; if the individual was foreign born, the year of immigration and the number of years in the United States; the citizenship status of foreign-born individuals over age twenty-one; occupation; whether the person could read, write, and speak English; whether the home was owned or rented; whether the home was on a farm; and whether the home was mortgaged. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1900 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1910 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, actual images of the 1910 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, T624, 1784 rolls may be browsed by selecting a state, county, township, and enumeration district.
Enumerators of the 1910 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; relationship to head of family; age at last birthday; sex; color or race; whether single, married, widowed, or divorced; number of years of present marriage; number of children born; number of children now living; birthplace; mother tongue; birthplace of father and mother; mother tongue of father and mother; year of immigration to the U.S.; whether naturalized or alien; whether able to speak English, or if not, give language spoken; trade or profession; industry; whether employer, employee, or working on own account; if an employee, whether out of work on April 15, 1910; if an employee, number of weeks out of work during year 1909, whether able to read; whether able to write; attended school any time since September 1, 1909; home owned or rented; home owned free or mortgaged; farm or house; number of farm schedule; whether a survivor of the Union or Confederate Army or Navy; whether blind; whether deaf and dumb. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1910 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

116. 6Nancy E. Stroud, dau. of 5John Stroud [33] and Martha Bobbitt. Born about 1860 in Orange, Indiana.

Married William H. Foster on 25 June 1881 in Crawford when about 21 years old. William H. Foster b. in Crawford.

Issue of Nancy E. Stroud and William H. Foster:

      i. son 7John D. Foster b. on 22 March 1884 in Milltown, Crawford, Indiana; m. Julia A. Sarles (20 March 1887 in Milltown–), dau. of John Wesley Sarles and Jane Jenkins, on 14 Feb. 1907 in Crawford when 22 years old (Julia A. was 19 years old).
      ii. son Charles A. Foster b. on 6 March 1887 in Crawford; m. Lota Leora Scott (20 July 1889 in Harrison–), dau. of John W. Scott and Prudence Seaton, on 9 May 1907 in Crawford when 20 years old (Lota Leora was 17 years old).

Notes on William H. Foster:

Notes for the family of William H. Foster and Nancy E. Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book E page 79Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by Walter Scott, MG

Sources for the family of William H. Foster and Nancy E. Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Seventh Generation


Issue of James Philips Mills and 6Sarah Kenworthy [41] (5Lucretia Skeen [16], 4Lydia Stroud [9], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1])

117. 7Brigadier General Anson Mills United States Army, son of James Philips Mills and 6Sarah Kenworthy [41]. Born on 21 Aug. 1834 in Thorntown, Boone, Indiana. Died on 5 Nov. 1924 in Washington, District Of Columbia, District of Colombia, USA, 90 years old. Buried in Northampton, Virginia, Arlington National Cemetery.

Married Hannah Cassel, dau. of William Culberson Cassel and Lydia Martin, on 13 Oct. 1868 in Zanesville, Muskingum, Ohio when 34 years old (Hannah was 21 or 22 years old). Hannah Cassel b. in 1846; d. on 14 May 1917 in Washington, 70 or 71 years old; bur. in Northampton.

Issue of Brigadier General Anson Mills United States Army and Hannah Cassel:

      i. son 8Anson Cassel Mills b. on 19 Nov. 1878 in (France), Paris, Seine; d. on 25 Feb. 1894 in Washington, 15 years old; bur. in Northampton.
      ii. son William Cassel Mills b. about 1880.
215   iii. dau. Constance Lydia Mills b. on 22 Oct. 1881 in Fort Sill, Comanche, Oklahoma, USA.
      iv. child _____ Mills d. before 1900.
      v. child _____ Mills d. before 1900.

Notes on Brigadier General Anson Mills United States Army:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3632@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Northampton, Virginia, Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington [86571]

Census
Date: 1860
Place: , El Paso, Texas
See source 1 for this person
Extracted text: Anson Mills, m, age 26, born Indiana, Surveyor Delores Gonzales, f, age 18, born Mexico, housekeeper
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [86580]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [86581]

Event: - Union Army, Capt, United States Army, Co H, 2nd Btn, 18th US Infantry
Type: Military Service
Place: War (1861-1865) (Civil)
Note: Later commanded the 1st Battalion, of the 18th US Infantry.
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): Anson Mills
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 14 SEP 1886 [86589]
Extracted text: Born on a farm in Boone County, Indiana. Attended West Point from 1855-57, but did not graduate. Engaged in land surveys and engineering projects in Texas, where he laid out the first plans for the city of El Paso. He left Texas in 1861 in order to volunteer for the Union Army. Was appointed to the 3rd US Cavalry. During the Civil War he was never absent either on leave or from sickness, but was present at all engagements of his regiment. Participated in the Indian Wars and commanded US troops at the battle of Slim Buttes, Dakota, September 9, 1876. Invented the woven cartridge belt for the Army. Was a member of the Mexican Boundry Commission. Wrote, “My Story,” in 1918. Army officer. Inventor. Developer. Boundary Commissioner. One of El Paso’s foremost pioneers, Anson Mills is known as the “Father of El Paso” because of his many contributions to the area. Mills was born in Thorntown, Indiana, on August 31, 1834, the first of nine children. His parents valued education and sent him at age six to a log school furnished with benches made of sawmill slabs with four legs and no back. At sixteen, Mills traveled by rail for five or six days to attend school at the large, coed Charlottesville Academy in New York. His classmates called him the “Russian Ambassador from the Woolly West” because of his country dialect and his large, dark moustache. Accepting a nomination to West Point, Mills found that he continued to be teased. After two years, Mills dropped out because of low math scores. Too embarrassed to return home, Mills traveled to the real “Woolly West” and tutored the children of Judge R. L. Waddell in McKinney, Texas, in 1857. A year later, he arrived in El Paso, a small settlement then named Franklin. It was across the river from a large, thriving town known as Paso del Norte. Even then, Mills recognized the valley would become an important place. Soon after his arrival, the Butterfield Overland Mail Company hired Mills to build its stage offices in El Paso, the halfway point of the Trail. The building, completed in September 1858 and located on two acres, remained the most imposing structure in El Paso for forty years. Historian W. H. Timmons says it was the largest and best-equipped office on the Butterfield Trail. On the recommendation of several acquaintances from West Point then at Fort Bliss, Mills became district surveyor. He surveyed Fort Quitman, Fort Stockton, Fort Davis and Fort Bliss for the military. The El Paso Company, a group of prominent citizens developing the land originally known as Ponce’s Rancho, hired Mills to survey the settlement known as Franklin. Leon Metz notes that Mills completed a plat or map of the town that looked much like today’s downtown. Mills noticed that the streets resembled a cow trail. Houses were built at random, and few streets were parallel or at right angles. One reason for this is that William Smith who had purchased Ponce’s Rancho in 1854, sold property to his friends without marking boundaries, and lots were shaped irregularly. This made it impossible to straighten streets. Mills named the principal streets for the stage lines of the Butterfield Overland Mail. St. Louis and San Antonio Streets headed eastward toward those cities; San Francisco pointed west, and Santa Fe headed north. Overland Street led to the stage office. Anson Mills is responsible for changing the name of Franklin to El Paso. In his autobiography, “My Story,” Mills says: “As this was not only the North and South Pass of the Rio Grande throughout the Rocky Mountains, but also the feasible route from east to west crossing that river for hundreds of miles, I suggested that El Paso would indicate the importance of the location.” Mills received $150 plus the title to several lots for surveying the town. For a while, Mills pitched a tent on a lot and set up housekeeping. Later, Mills and his two brothers, William Wallace and Emmett, built a ranch 18-miles north of El Paso. They named it “Los Tres Hermanos.” While building his house, Mills supervised the building of other neighbors’ homes. When the Civil War broke out, Mills and his brother William were the only two in El Paso who voted against the secession of Texas from the Union. In 1861, Mills left town to join the Union Army. He became a career soldier, retiring as a brigadier general. He invented a woven-web ammunition belt that would make him wealthy. After the war, he returned to El Paso. In 1883, Mills along with Josiah Crosby built the Grand Central Hotel, which was “the acme of luxury and comfort,” according to the January 1, 1885, El Paso Times. A spectacular fire destroyed it in 1892 because firemen could not get water to the fourth floor. Leon Metz says that in 1910, Mills built the “tallest concrete monolith in the world” on the same site of his hotel, but this time with fireproof materials. A storefront first floor of the Mills Building housed the White House Department Store, the Modern Cafe, the United States Public Defender and, later, the El Paso Electric Company. Located on the corner of Mills Avenue and Oregon Street, the Mills Building continues to be a landmark in downtown El Paso. Among the most important of Mills’ contributions to the area include his work on the International Boundary Commission to which he was named in January 1894. The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo had set the Rio Grande as the border between Mexico and the U.S. but had not considered the results of flooding which frequently moved land from one country to the other. In 1895 Mexican farmers sued to reclaim some 630 acres of land from the United States. After the two countries could not agree on a settlement, the “Chamizal” dispute was submitted to arbitration by the International Boundary Commission. Anson Mills, representing the U.S., rejected the decision to return the land to Mexico, and this area would remain in limbo until 1962 when the land in question was divided, with the U.S. receiving 190 acres and Mexico, 437 acres. Mills was successful in 1905 in negotiating a treaty for the elimination of “bancos,” horseshoe bends in the river that shifted water channels often clouding international boundaries. Metz says that engineers sliced through the necks of the bancos, and those loops extending into Texas belonged to the United States and the ones falling below the river belonged to Mexico. By 1970, 30,000 acres of land had changed ownership, and 241 bancos had been eliminated. Because settlements in Colorado and New Mexico used so much water from the Rio Grande, El Paso and Juarez farmers often ran short of water. In 1888, Mills suggested building an international dam one mile north of where ASARCO is located today. It would regulate the flow of the Rio Grande, provide irrigation water for about 20,000 acres of valley land and fix boundary problems. Mills went to Washington to win approval for his idea, but the Secretary of Interior had licensed a private company to build a dam in Elephant Butte 120 miles north of El Paso. Mills tried proving that a dam there would dry up the Rio Grande, making it too shallow for navigation, but in spite of his efforts, his idea was rejected. However, Mills was able to negotiate a treaty called “An Equitable Distribution of the Water of the Rio Grande” in 1906, which guaranteed Mexico 60,000 acre-feet of water annually from Elephant Butte Dam. Anson Mills’ accomplishments were many, not the least of which were in the field of politics. Mills’ vote against secession symbolized his viewpoints on important topics: he disagreed with many in town and held opinions considered ahead of his time. Leon Metz writes that Mills considered war the most destructive of man’s evils. He supported women’s suffrage and racial equality and backed prohibition. In 1913, the city council honored Mills by changing the name of St. Louis Street to Mills Avenue. In 1918, Anson Mills wrote his autobiography, “My Story.” On November 5, 1924, at the age of 90, he died at his home. He was buried with honors at Arlington National Cemetery in Washington, D.C. Downtown El Paso serves as a fitting tribute to this man of vision.
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [86733]
See source 3 for this person
Page(s): Page 560, 577, 580, & 583
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Battle of Resaca, Georgia while serving as Commander of Company H, 2nd Battalion, 18th US Infantry. Breveted for gallantry in action. Wounded on July 30th,
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Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [86744]
See source 4 for this person
Page(s): Anson Mills
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Anson Mills
Media format: jpg
Media file: Civil War Campaign Medal - Army.jpg
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Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Fulton, Georgia
See source 5 for this person
Extracted text: Mills, Anson, age 35, born Indiana, Bre LtCol, US Army , Hannah, age 23, born Ohio
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Event: - United States Army, Brigadier General, 3rd US Cavalry
Type: Military Service
Place: War (1865-1891) (Indian)
See source 6 for this person
Page(s): General Anson Mills
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: After the Little Big Horn debacle (see CUSTER, GEORGE ARMSTRONG), he took part in the “horsemeat march” during Gen. George Crook’s Big Horn and Yellowstone expedition. As the starving army began eating its own horses, Mills led a supply detachment and encountered Indians. For his role in the resulting fight at Slim Buttes, Mills always believed he deserved the Medal of Honor, though he never received it.
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Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [86796]
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See source 7 for this person
Page(s): The Sioux War of 1876-1877
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: The Reservation System: The Sioux War of 1866-68 clearly established the dominance of the Oglala Sioux over U.S. forces in northern Wyoming and southern Montana east of the Bighorn Mountains. The treaty of 1868 between the Sioux nation and the United States thereby recognized the right of the Sioux to roam and hunt in the areas depicted in gray on the map. This territory was called unceded in recognition of the fact that although the United States did not recognize Sioux ownership of the land, neither did it deny that the Sioux had hunting rights there. The treaty also established a reservation in Dakota Territory wherein “the United States now solemnly agrees that no persons except those herein designated and authorized so to do ... shall ever be permitted to pass over, settle upon, or reside in the territory described in this article ... and henceforth the [Indians] will, and do, hereby relinquish all claims or right in and to any portion of the United States or Territories, except such as is embraced within the limits aforesaid, and except as hereinafter provided.” This provision clearly established the solemn rights of the Sioux to perpetual ownership of the reservation. In the spring of 1874, General Philip H. Sheridan, commanding the Military Division of the Missouri, directed his subordinate, Brigadier General Alfred H. Terry, commanding the Department of Dakota, to send a reconnaissance party into the Black Hills to ascertain the suitability of establishing an Army garrison there. This reconnaissance party, commanded by Lieutenant Colonel George A. Custer, not only determined the adequacy of the ground for a garrison but found evidence of gold. The news flashed through the nation, triggering a gold rush to the Black Hills of what is now South Dakota. The difficulty was that the Black Hills region was squarely inside the territory reserved to the Sioux in the treaty of 1868. But no American government, no matter how progressive, would have attempted to restrain such a great number of citizens in their pursuit of happiness (as manifested by their dreams of gold). The predicament faced by President Ulysses S, Grant was that he could not prevent Americans from entering the Black Hills; at the same time, he could not legally allow them to go there. Rationalizing an excuse for war with the Sioux seemed to be Grant’s only choice to resolve the matter. If the government fought the Sioux and won, the Black Hills would be ceded as a spoil of war. But Grant chose not to fight the Sioux who remained on the reservations. Rather, he was determined to attack that portion of the Sioux roaming in the unceded land on the pretext that they were committing atrocities on settlers beyond the Indians’ borders. Accordingly, Grant ordered the Bureau of Indian Affairs to issue an ultimatum to the Indians to return voluntarily to their reservation by 31 January 1876 or be forced there by military action. There were two categories of roamers outside the reservation, most of whom ignored the ultimatum. One category, called winter roamers, spurned all sustenance from the white man and lived in the unceded area. Those in the other category, called summer roamers, took the white man’s dole in the winter but pursued their old ways in warmer weather. When Sheridan received the mission to mount a campaign against the Indians in the unceded area, he believed he would be fighting the winter roamers only. As the weather turned warmer, however, the number of summer roamers grew in the unceded area, creating a greater threat to the soldiers. Sheridan’s Campaign Plan: Professional military officers of the 1870s held several assumptions to be fundamental truths when fighting Indians. First, they believed that the Indians would not stand against organized forces; in any situation where U.S. forces met Indians-no matter the numbers-the Indians would run. A second belief was that the Indians would never seek battle with U.S. troops unless the soldiers were in proximity to their villages. Finally, officers were convinced that even the meager opposition ordinarily offered by the Indians would be greatly reduced in the the foundation of these assumptions, Sheridan formed his campaign plan. Sheridan directed Brigadier General Alfred H. Terry, commanding the Department of Dakota, and Brigadier General George Crook, commanding the Department of the Platte, to find and defeat the Indians. Sheridan’s communications with his generals clearly indicate that he wanted to conduct the campaign in the winter, catching the Indians in their worst circumstances. Unfortunately, the orders to these coequal department commanders specified no overall commander for the operation, nor did they even specify coordinating instructions between the two. Sheridan’s own words in his annual report demonstrate the sparse attention he devoted to coordination: “General Terry was further informed that the operation of himself and General Crook would be made without concert, as the Indian villages are movable and no objective point could be fixed upon, but that, if they should come to any understanding about concerted movements, there would be no objection at division headquarters.” There was a practical consequence to Sheridan’s vague instructions. Terry instructed Colonel John Gibbon, his subordinate commanding the District of Montana, to gather all his scattered detachments and begin a march from the west. Terry himself would command a column moving from the east. Each of these forces was to follow the Yellowstone River and unite. Meanwhile, Crook was to form his own column and march from the south. Together, all these separate operational plans constituted what has commonly been referred to as Sheridan’s campaign plan, and indeed, all of them flowed logically from his instructions. However, the final pincer movement was never clarified in any set of orders. Sheridan’s disregard for coordination between,his separate columns provides some indication of his contempt for the fighting capabilities of the Sioux. It was a contempt that would lead to ineffective combat operations throughout the winter and well into the summer of 1876. Crook’s March to the Powder River: Brigadier General George Crook was the first to embark. Anticipating the coming campaign, he secretly had been gathering units from scattered posts throughout his department. When the order to fight came, he was nearly ready to start his northward march from Fort Fetterman (near Douglas, Wyoming), Crook’s troops marched out on 1 March 1876. The weather was crystal clear and bitterly cold. Having placed Colonel Joseph J. Reynolds in command of the column, Crook was nominally an observer. Crook, however, retained practical control, and Reynolds was largely a supernumerary. Marching with Crook and Reynolds were ten cavalry companies, two infantry companies, and sixty-two civilian packers. These units, plus Crook’s staff, the guides, and reporters, totaled 883 men. Crook, a master of efficient and effective pack trains, had his column well prepared for its winter campaign. Trouble began almost immediately. Indian spies were spotted every day, and the frequency of smoke signals suggested to the soldiers that their advance was being observed. On the second night out, the Indians successfully stampeded the livestock herd, depriving the troops of their only source of fresh meat. On 5 March, the Indians boldly staged a raid against the soldiers’ camp. Finally, Crook tired of marching under the watchful eye of the Indians. On the morning of 7 March, he ordered the infantry companies to make a great show of marching back to the abandoned Fort Reno site (near Sussex, Wyoming) with the trains. The cavalry, stripped down to minimum subsistence for fifteen days, would bide on the day of the 7th and resume its march that evening. The ruse worked; the ten cavalry companies escaped the Indian spies and roamed unnoticed for the next ten days. The problem was that Crook and Reynolds could not find the Indians. Finally, Frank Grouard, the most knowledgeable of the scouts, suggested that while the cavalry was searching along the Tongue River, the Indians likely would be sheltered in the Powder River valley. Crook accepted Grouard’s opinion and had him guide the force to the Powder River. True to his word, Grouard found signs of a village just north of present-day Moorhead, Montana. Crook now detached Reynolds (putting him truly in command of a combat expedition) with six companies of cavalry and most of the scouts. Grouard, exhibiting brilliant scouting, led the detachment through a blizzard to the vicinity of a Cheyenne village. The circumstances were now right for Crook to strike the first blow in the 1876 Sioux War and for Reynolds to display his prowess as a combat leader. Reynolds’ Battle on the Powder River: Reynolds sortied from Crook’s command with three two-company battalions of cavalry: E and M Companies, 3d Cavalry, commanded by Captain Anson Mills; I and K Companies, 2d Cavalry, commanded by Captain Henry E. Noyes; and E Company, 2d Cavalry, and F Company, 3d Cavalry, commanded by Captain Alexander Moore. Also accompanying the expedition was Lieutenant John Bourke, Crook’s aide-de-camp, who joined the detachment as Crook’s observer, Most of the scouts also went with Reynolds. This was a discontented command; the officers had no confidence in their commander’s tactical abilities nor his physical and moral courage. Perhaps it was a self-fulfilling prophesy, but Reynolds proved true to the low esteem in which his officers held him. Through driving snow and temperatures that ranged as low as 80 degrees below zero, scout Grouard literally felt his way along the trail that led to the Powder River. At about 0230 on 17 March, he halted the column until he could locate the Indian village. While the troops waited in the bitter cold, Grouard successfully pinpointed the Indians’ location. This was the grand opportunity to strike the Indians that U.S. commanders had been awaiting. Reynolds’ attack orders were inexact, but he did issue a general outline of his tactical plan (see map A). Captain James Egan’s company of Noyes’ battalion was to approach the village quietly and assault it upon being detected. Meanwhile, Noyes and his remaining company would drive the Indian pony herd away from the village. On its part, Moore’s battalion was to dismount and move to the bluffs overlooking the village to support Egan’s assault. Mills was initially given no mission, but eventually, Reynolds had him follow Moore to assist where practical. Noyes and Egan moved into position and initiated the attack satisfactorily (see map B). However, Moore was not yet in position. Consequently, the Indians were able to flee to the bluffs that commanded a view of the soldiers now occupying the village. At this point, Egan’s company was in great danger of being cut off, but Mills’ battalion was soon available to reinforce it. When Moore’s battalion belatedly entered the valley, it was added to the forces occupying the village. Noyes, who had successfully captured the pony herd, was resting his unsaddled horses when he was urgently ordered to join the fray in the village. Throughout the fight, Reynolds had become increasingly anxious about the safety and protection of his detachment. Fearing the loss of his command, he ordered the rapid destruction of the Indian village so that he could withdraw. Some Indian property was destroyed, but Reynolds’ demand for haste caused much to be overlooked. During his return march, the Indians regained most of their pony herd. In exchange for four killed and six wounded troopers, Reynolds had gained virtually nothing beyond warning the Sioux of the government’s intentions. Beaten and ashamed, Reynolds’ force rejoined Crook at the mouth of Lodgepole Creek. Then, twenty-six days after its departure, the entire force returned to Fort Fetterman-- worn, weary, and defeated. Terry’s and Gibbon’s Approach: Colonel John Gibbon’s column from the west was next into the field. Gibbon chose to gather his widely separated companies at Fort Ellis (near Bozeman, Montana). Accompanying him on his march from Fort Ellis between 1 and 3 April were 4 companies of the 2d Cavalry Regiment and 5 companies of the 7th Infantry Regiment, comprising a total of 450 men. After marching down the Yellowstone River and briefly halting at the camp supply to improve his sustainment capability, Gibbon arrived near the mouth of Tullock Creek. It was here that Crook’s movements far to the south affected Gibbons actions. Since Crook did not plan to take to the field until mid-May, Brigadier General Alfred H. Terry ordered Gibbon to halt until his movements could be coordinated with the other columns. Thus, Gibbon waited at his camp between 21 April and 9 May. In this nineteen-day period, Gibbon sent out several reconnaissance patrols, most of which found no trace of the Sioux. However, in attempting to track Sioux horse thieves, Gibbon’s remarkable chief of scouts, Lieutenant James H. Bradley, on 16 May pinpointed the location of a major Indian village on the Tongue River. Upon learning of Bradley’s find, Gibbon ordered his command to march down the Yellowstone, cross to its south bank, and attack the village. Unfortunately, Gibbon’s men proved unequal to the task of crossing the Yellowstone. After unsuccessful efforts lasting one hour, Gibbon canceled both the movement and the attack. Following this abortive attempt, Gibbon reported to Terry neither Bradley’s finding nor his own failure to cross the Yellowstone. Meanwhile, this large Sioux village continued to send parties of warriors to harass Gibbon’s camp until 23 May, when all contact with the hostile Indians ceased. Again, however, it was the enterprising Bradley who found the Sioux, this time on Rosebud Creek, even nearer Gibbon’s location. Once again, Gibbon reported neither the Indians’ harassment nor Bradley’s discovery of the Rosebud camp. During Gibbon’s movements, inclement weather had delayed the departure of Terry’s column for the field. In the interim, Terry busily collected supplies and planned river transport to support his overland march. The river route was to follow the Missouri northwest, then turn southwest up the Yellowstone, and end at Glendive Depot (near present-day Glendive, Montana). At last, on 17 May, Terry’s overland column departed from Fort Abraham Lincoln. His force consisted of twelve companies of the 7th Cavalry Regiment under the command of Lieutenant Colonel George A. Custer and three and one-half companies of infantry. Terry’s column totaled 925 men. Through a misreading of intelligence, Terry expected to find the Indians along the Little Missouri River, far to the east of where they actually were. Discovering no Indians at the Little Missouri, he moved farther west, camping on Beaver Creek on 3 June. Here, Terry received a dispatch from Gibbon (dated 27 May) that vaguely referred to sightings of hostile Indians but gave no specific details and skeptically dealt with Bradley’s discovery only in a postscript. As a result of this dispatch, Terry turned south on Beaver Creek and resolved to travel west to the Powder River. To facilitate his further movement, he instructed his base force at Glendive Depot to send a boat with supplies to the mouth of the Powder River. Reaching the Powder late on 7 June, Terry personally went downstream to the Yellowstone the next day, hoping to consult with Gibbon. He was pleasantly surprised to find several couriers from Gibbon’s force at the river. Here, he finally gained the intelligence that Gibbon had not heretofore reported. Terry now took personal control of both columns. Crook’s Advance to the Rosebud: On 28 May 1876, Brigadier General George Crook assumed direct command of the Bighorn and Yellowstone Expedition at Fort Fetterman. Crook had drawn together an impressive force from his Department of the Platte. Leaving Fort Fetterman on 29 May, the 1,051-man column consisted of 15 companies from the 2d and 3d Cavalry, 5 companies from the 4th and 9th Infantry, 250 mules, and 106 wagons. Frank Grouard, an experienced scout who had worked with Crook on earlier campaigns, rode ahead of the column to recruit Crow warriors as scouts. On 2 June, in spite of the poor weather, Crook pushed his force northward to the site of Fort Reno, supremely confident that he would redress Reynolds’ previous failure on the Powder River. When Crook arrived at the ruins of Fort Reno, Grouard and the scouts were absent. Many of the Crow braves had balked at serving with the Army, and only extensive negotiations and Grouard’s offer of substantial rewards would eventually convince them to join Crook. The day after arriving at Reno, Crook’s column headed north without the Indian allies, Lacking Grouard’s guiding hand, however, the expedition soon became lost. On 6 June, mistaking the headwaters of Prairie Dog Creek for Little Goose Creek, Crook led his column to a campsite six miles from where Captain Henry E. Noyes and an advance party were waiting. The next day, Crook’s command moved to the confluence of Prairie Dog Creek and the Tongue River, where it camped for the next four days. At this time, several Black Hills prospectors asked for permission to travel with Crook’s column. Within a week, Crook’s civilian contingent grew to approximately eighty men. On 9 June, Sioux or Cheyenne warriors raided the encampment on the Tongue. Four companies of Crook’s cavalry quickly repulsed the attackers. Although Crook’s casualties were insignificant, the attack was clear evidence that the Indians were in the area and prepared to fight. Finally, on 11 June, Crook led the column eleven miles back up Prairie Dog Creek, then seven miles to his original destination at the forks of Goose Creek (present-day Sheridan, Wyoming), where he established a permanent camp. As the officers and men enjoyed the excellent hunting and fishing in the area, Crook prepared for the final phase of the campaign. On 14 June, Grouard arrived with 261 Shoshone and Crow allies to join the expedition. Based on intelligence from Grouard, Crook now ordered his entire force to lighten itself for a quick march. Each man was to carry only 1 blanket, 100 rounds of ammunition, and 4 days’ rations. The wagon train would be left at Goose Creek, and the infantry would be mounted on the pack mules. The infantrymen, many of whom were novice riders, received one day’s training on the reluctant mules, much to the delight of the cavalry spectators. At 0600 on 16 June, Crook led his force of more than 1,300 soldiers, Indians, and civilians out of the encampment at Goose Creek. Crossing the Tongue about six miles to the north, the column proceeded downriver until early afternoon, when it turned west and crossed the divide to the headwaters of Rosebud Creek. At 1900, the lead elements of the force reached a small swampy area, near the source of the Rosebud, and bivouacked. The Battle of the Rosebud: The Sioux and Cheyenne Attack, 0800-0830 On 17 June, Crook’s column roused itself at 0300 and set out at 0600, marching northward along the south fork of Rosebud Creek. The holiday atmosphere that prevailed since the arrival of the Indian scouts on 15 June was suddenly absent. The Crow and Shoshone scouts were particularly apprehensive. Although the column had not yet encountered any sign of Indians, the scouts seemed to sense their presence. The soldiers, on their part, were apparently fatigued from the previous day’s 35-mile march and their early morning reveille, particularly the mule-riding infantry. At 0800, Crook stopped to rest his men and animals, Although he was deep in hostile territory, Crook made no special dispositions for defense. His troops merely halted in their marching order. The battalions of Captains Anson Mills and Henry E. Noyes led the column, followed by Captain Frederick Van Vliet’s battalion and Major Alexander Chambers’ battalion of mule-borne foot soldiers, Captain Guy V. Henry’s battalion and a provisional company of civilian miners and packers brought up the rear. Fortunately the Crow and Shoshone scouts remained alert while the soldiers rested. Several minutes later, the soldiers in camp could hear the sound of intermittent gunfire coming from the bluffs to the north. At first, they dismissed the noise as nothing more than the scouts taking potshots at buffalo. As the intensity of fire increased, a scout rushed into the camp shouting, “Lakota, Lakota!” The Battle of the Rosebud was on. By 0830, the Sioux and Cheyenne had hotly engaged Crook’s Indian allies on the high ground north of the main body. Heavily outnumbered, the Crow and Shoshone scouts fell back toward the camp, but their fighting withdrawal gave Crook time to deploy his forces. The Battle of the Rosebud: Crook’s Counterattack, 0830-1000 In response to the Indian attack, Crook directed his forces to seize the high ground north and south of the Rosebud. He ordered Captain Van Vliet, with C and G Companies, 3d Cavalry, to occupy the high bluffs to the south. Van Vliet scaled the hill just in time to drive off a small band of Sioux approaching from the east. In the north, the commands of Major Chambers (D and F Companies, 4th Infantry, and C, G, and H Companies, 9th Infantry) and Captain Noyes (B, E, and I Companies, 2d Cavalry) formed a dismounted skirmish line and advanced toward the Sioux, Their progress war, slow, however, because of flanking fire from Indians occupying the high ground to the northeast. To accelerate the advance, Crook ordered Captain Mills, commanding six companies (A, B, E, I, L, and M) of the 3d Cavalry, to charge this group of hostiles. Mills’ mounted charge unnerved the Indians and forced them to withdraw northwest along the ridgeline, not stopping until they reached the next crest (now called Crook’s Ridge). Here, Mills quickly re-formed three of his mounted companies (A, E, and M) and led his troopers in another charge, driving the Indians northwest again to the next hill (Conical Hill). Mills was preparing to drive the Indians from Conical Hill when he received orders from Crook to cease his advance and assume a defensive posture. Chambers and Noyes now led their forces forward in support and, within minutes, joined Mills on top of the ridge. The bulk of Crooks command, now joined by the packers and miners, occupied Crook’s Ridge. Establishing his headquarters there at approximately 0930, Crook contemplated his next move. Meanwhile, at the west end of the field, Lieutenant Colonel William Royall, Crook’s second in command, pursued the Indians attacking the rear of Crook’s camp. Leading Captain Henry’s battalion (D, F, and L Companies, 3d Cavalry) and two companies (B and I) borrowed from Mills’ command, Royall advanced rapidly along the ridgeline to the northwest, finally halting his advance near the head of Kollmar Creek. Royall’s detachment was now a mile from the main body and in some danger of being cut off and destroyed. Sensing this vulnerability and exploiting their superb mobility, the Sioux and Cheyenne warriors shifted their main effort to the west and concentrated their attacks on Royall’s troopers. Crook, recognizing the danger, sent orders to Royall to withdraw to Crooks Ridge. Inexplicably, Royall sent only B Company to join Crook. Royall later claimed that heavy pressure from the Indians made withdrawing the entire command too risky. However, B Company’s limited losses (one man wounded) belie Royall’s claim. The Battle of the Rosebud: Crook’s Search for the Village, 1000-1130 Crook’s initial charges secured key terrain but did little to damage the Indian force. The bluecoats’ assaults invariably scattered the Indian defenders but did not keep them away. After falling back, the Sioux and Cheyenne warriors returned to snipe at the soldiers from long range. Occasionally, single warriors or small groups of Indians demonstrated their valor by charging forward and exchanging a few close-range shots with the troopers. But when pressed, the Indians sped away on their nimble ponies. Crook soon realized his charges were indecisive. Casting about for a way to defeat his elusive opponent, Crook returned to his original campaign plan. Since the Indians had been fighting him with unprecedented tenacity, it suggested that they might be fighting to defend their families in a nearby village. Thus, Crook decided to advance down the Rosebud valley where he hoped to find the hostile encampment and force the enemy to stand and fight. At about 1030, Crook ordered Mills and Noyes to withdraw their commands from the high ground and follow the Rosebud north. To replace the cavalry, Crook recalled Van Vliet’s battalion from the south side of the Rosebud. One mile to the west, Royall’s situation continued to deteriorate. Royall tried to withdraw across Kollmar Creek but found the Indians’ fire too heavy. Instead, he withdrew southeast along the ridgeline. In an attempt to further isolate and overwhelm Royall’s force, a large group of Indians charged boldly down the valley of Kollmar Creek, advancing all the way to the Rosebud. The fortuitous arrival of Van Vliet’s command, however, checked the Indians’ advance. Crook then ordered his Crow and Shoshone scouts to charge into the withdrawing warriors’ flank, throwing the hostiles into great confusion. Troubled by fire from Indians on Conical Hill, Crook ordered Chambers’ infantry to drive the Sioux away. The foot soldiers promptly forced an enemy withdrawal-but to little avail. It was a repetition of the same old pattern; the soldiers could drive the Sioux away at will, but they could not fix and destroy them. Crook could only wait and hope that Mills’ advance down the valley would be successful. The Battle of the Rosebud: The End of the Battle, 1130-1330 Mills’ advance on the suspected Indian village did nothing to suppress the Indians. Crook’s assumption about the presence of an Indian encampment proved totally false; there was no nearby Indian village. The most important consequence of Mills’ action was to leave Crook without sufficient force to aid Royall and his hard-pressed battalion. While Mills made his way down the Rosebud, Royall’s situation grew worse. At approximately 1130, Royall withdrew southeastward a second time and assumed a new defensive position. From here, he hoped to lead his command across Kollmar Creek and rendezvous with Crook. Meanwhile, the Sioux and Cheyenne assailed him from three sides, growing ever bolder in their attacks. Observing the situation from his headquarters, Crook realized that Royall would need help in extricating himself, help only Mills’ force could provide. Consequently, Crook sent orders to Mills canceling his original mission and directing him to turn west to fall on the rear of the Indians pressing Royall. At approximately 1230, Royall decided he could wait no longer and began withdrawing his troopers into the Kollmar ravine to remount their horses. From there, his men would have to race through a hail of fire before reaching the relative safety of Crook’s main position. As they began their dash, the Crow and Shoshone scouts countercharged the pursuing enemy, relieving much of the pressure on Royall’s men. Two companies of infantry also left the main position to provide covering fire from the northeast side of the ravine. In spite of this gallant assistance, Royall’s command suffered grievous casualties. Nearly 80 percent of the total Army losses (ten killed, twenty-one wounded) in the Battle of the Rosebud came from Royall’s four companies of the 3d Cavalry (nine killed and fifteen wounded). While the last of Royall’s men extricated themselves, Mills digested his new instructions from Crook, Since Mills’ command had driven off a small party of Sioux near the bend in the Rosebud, it apparently led him to believe that the Indian village was nearby. But Mills’ scouts were extremely reluctant to proceed. They thought that the narrow valley of the Rosebud was an ideal ambush site and predicted disaster if the column continued northward. Crook’s new orders ended the controversy. Mills climbed out of the canyon and proceeded westward toward Conical Hill. Mills arrived too late to assist Royall’s withdrawal, but his unexpected appearance on the Indians’ flank caused the Sioux and Cheyenne to break contact and retreat. Concentrating his mounted units, Crook now led them up the Rosebud in search of the nonexistent Indian village. Again, the scouts refused to enter the narrow canyon, forcing Crook to abandon the pursuit. The Battle of the Rosebud was over. By the standards of Indian warfare, it had been an extremely long and bloody engagement. Never before had the Plains Indians fought with such ferocity, and never before had they shown such a willingness to accept casualties (estimates of Indian casualties run as high as 102 killed and wounded). Nor was their sacrifice in vain. Concerned for his wounded, short on supplies, and perhaps still shaken by the Indians’ ferocity, Crook returned to his camp on Goose Creek and stayed there for seven weeks awaiting reinforcements. His command would play no role in the momentous events at Little Bighorn. Terry’s Campaign, 10-24 June Unaware of Crook’s activities but armed with the information furnished by Gibbon’s messengers, Brigadier General Alfred H. Terry finally had specific, if somewhat stale, intelligence regarding the Indian locations. This new information called for new orders, which Terry issued on 10 June. Major Marcus A. Reno of Lieutenant Colonel George A. Custer’s command was to take six companies of cavalry on a reconnaissance of the valleys of the Powder River, Mizpah Creek, and Tongue River. Under no circumstances was he to venture west of the Tongue so as not to alarm the Indians on Rosebud Creek, Reno was to finish his reconnaissance at the mouth of the Tongue, where he was to rejoin Custer and the rest of the 7th Cavalry Regiment. Following Reno’s reconnaissance, Terry intended to drive southward in parallel columns, Custer’s cavalry on the Tongue and Gibbon’s predominantly infantry force on the Rosebud. After ascending the Tongue for an appropriate distance, Custer’s more mobile command would turn west toward the Rosebud and descend that creek to join Gibbon’s force. While Reno failed to scout all of Mizpah Creek, he essentially followed Terry’s orders until 15 June. After descending the Tongue River for only eight miles, he then decided to turn west to investigate enemy signs on the Rosebud. Although he disobeyed Terry’s direct instructions by advancing up the Rosebud, Reno was able to determine that Terry’s plan of parallel columns would not work; the Indians had already traveled beyond the area encompassed by Terry’s pincer movement. The information generated by Reno’s reconnaissance caused Terry to formulate yet another plan. While all of his forces gathered at the mouth of the Rosebud, he designed a second pincer movement similar to the first. Terry’s written orders provided full latitude for Custer to diverge from them; paradoxically, they also enumerated a specific set of instructions for Custer to follow. Whether Custer disobeyed orders is a controversy that continues to this day. Terry’s orders directed Custer to ascend the Rosebud and follow the trail of the Indians. If the trail diverged from the Rosebud to the west, he was, nonetheless, to continue up that creek to ensure that the Indians would not escape to the south. Near the headwaters of Rosebud Creek, Custer was to cross the divide into the Little Bighorn River drainage. Meanwhile, Gibbon’s force was to move up the Yellowstone River, turn south up the Bighorn, and establish itself at the mouth of the Little Bighorn. On 21 June, Custer departed with his regiment of 12 companies (652 men). Shortly thereafter, Terry and Gibbon led the remaining forces, 4 cavalry companies and 5 infantry companies (723 men), westward along the Yellowstone on their route to the mouth of the Little Bighorn. Each of these two columns followed Terry’s plan to the letter until the evening of 24 June. Custer’s Approach to the Crow’s Nest: At 1945 on 24 June 1876, Custer camped at the Busby, bend of Rosebud Creek. Throughout that day’s march, he, his soldiers, and his scouts had seen increasing signs of the Sioux village. Still unclear was whether the Indians had continued up the Rosebud or had turned west toward the Little Bighorn River. At 2100, four Crow scouts returned to camp with news that the Sioux trail led westward out of the Rosebud valley. Custer now faced a dilemma. Terry’s orders directed him to continue up the Rosebud to its head, then turn west toward the Little Bighorn. Through this maneuver, Terry intended to trap the Indians between Custer’s force and Gibbon’s colunm. On the other hand, continuing up the Rosebud entailed several risks: possible discovery by Indian scouts, the loss of contact with the Indian village, and the possibility of leaving Gibbon’s force to fight the Indians alone. After weighing his options, Custer chose to maintain contact by following the Sioux trail over the divide. At 2120, Custer sent his chief of scouts, Lieutenant Charles A. Varnum, to a natural observation point called the Crow’s Nest to pinpoint the location of the Sioux village. While Varnum was absent, Custer decided to move his column at night to the divide between the Rosebud Creek and Little Bighorn River. Then, his force would hide there throughout the day of 25 June in a small pocket nestled at the base of the Crow’s Nest. That evening, he planned to approach the village, assume attack positions before dawn on 26 June, and attack the Indians at first light. At 0030 on 25 June, Custer led his soldiers out of the Busby camp toward the divide. After a slow, dusty, and disagreeable night march lasting nearly three hours, he halted his column about an hour before sunrise to cook breakfast. At 0730, Custer received a message from Varnum at the Crows Nest. Although Varnum had not personally seen signs of the Sioux village (now in the Little Bighorn valley), his Indian scouts claimed to have seen it. Unwilling to act without making his own observations, Custer and a small party left at 0800 for the Crow’s Nest, while Major Reno brought the regiment forward. During Varnum’s wait for Custer at the Crow’s Nest, his scouts saw two groups of hostile Indians that appeared to notice Custer’s column. Custer reached the Crow’s Nest at 0900, but like Varnum, he was unable to identify any signs of the Sioux village, Varnum’s Indian scouts, however, convinced Custer of its presence in the Little Bighorn valley. The scouts further argued that the column’s movement had been compromised and that a stealthy approach to the village was now impossible. Custer adamantly rejected this advice while at the Crow’s Nest, but his subsequent actions indicate he must have changed his mind by the time he rejoined the column at the foot of the peak. Custer’s Approach to the Little Bighorn: During Custer’s absence, Major Reno had moved the column forward to a position just north of the Crow’s Nest. Upon his return, Custer learned of a further threat to his force’s security. During the night march, one of the pack mules had lost part of its load. The detail sent to retrieve it discovered several hostile Indians rummaging through its contents. The soldiers fired on the Indians, scattering them but not killing them. Coupled with the observations of Varnum’s scouts, this latest breach of security forced Custer to discard his original plan for a stealthy approach. Instead of concealing his command throughout the day of 25 June, he would have to approach and attack the village immediately. Ironically, none of the Indians that spotted the column reported their findings to the village until after the battle, but Custer had no way of knowing that. At 1050, Custer gathered his officers and detailed his new plan and the organization of the column. He directed each company commander to assign one noncommissioned officer and six men to accompany the pack train. The companies would depart in the order in which they finished preparations to move. The troopers resumed their march at 1145, with Captain Frederick W. Benteen’s company in the van. They had not proceeded more than one-half mile past the divide when Custer ordered another halt. There, he reorganized his command into four parts: Benteen’s battalion with D, H, and K Companies (120 men); Reno’s battalion with A, G, and M Companies (175 men); Custer’s battalion with C, E, F, I, and L Companies (221 men); and Captain Thomas M. McDougall’s augmented company with the pack train (136 men). Custer now detached Benteen, ordering him to scout southward to determine whether the Indians were escaping in that direction. As soon as Benteen concluded that the Indians were not escaping, he was to rejoin the command as quickly as possible. Meanwhile, Custer and Reno continued their advance down what is now Reno Creek, with Custer’s battalion on the right bank and Reno’s on the left. Benteen began his reconnaissance enthusiastically, but after crossing a series of ridges without finding any trace of the Indians, he concluded that he was being deliberately excluded from the fight. As a result, he lost his previous sense of urgency. In the meantime, Custer and Reno had proceeded down Reno Creek until they united on the right bank at a lone epee containing the body of a warrior mortally wounded in the Rosebud fight. At the tepee, Custer’s scouts reported that they could see the Sioux pony herd and Indians running in the distance. At 1415, Custer and Reno departed the lone tepee location at a trot and advanced nearly three miles to a flat area between Reno Creek and its north fork. There, more Sioux were seen, two of whom rode to a hill to give the alarm. Custer now ordered Reno to follow Reno Creek to the Little Bighorn, ford the river, and assault the village in a mounted charge. Custer promised Reno that he would support the attack with the remainder of the command. After Reno’s departure, Custer briefly followed Reno’s trail, reaching the north fork of Reno Creek at 1500. There, he received a series of surprising reports from Reno indicating that the Indians were not running as expected. Once again, Custer was forced to revise his plans. Reno’s Fight in the Valley: After receiving his instructions and leaving Custer for the last time, Reno recrossed to the left bank of Reno Creek and followed the stream to its confluence, with the Little Bighorn, where he briefly stopped to water the horses. Five minutes later, Reno’s battalion forded the Little Bighorn and deployed into a line across the narrow, flat valley. For the first time, Reno could see the edge of what now appeared to be an enormous Indian village. At 1503, Reno, ordered his men to advance down the valley. As their horses accelerated to a fast trot, several officers and men in the advancing line could see troopers from Custer’s battalion on the bluffs to the east, beyond the Little Bighorn. They could also see a swarm of Indian warriors gathering at the southern edge of the village. At the same time, Reno’s Indian scouts, who initially formed the left flank of his line, veered westward toward the Indian pony herd on the bench above the Little Bighorn. Their task was to drive off as much of the herd as possible to prevent the Indians’ escape. At 1513, officers and men in the charging line once again saw soldiers on the crest of the hill across the Little Bighorn. Several of Reno’s men later testified that they could clearly see Custer waving his hat to the line of horsemen in the valley. Within a few minutes, Reno concluded that without immediate support, his 135-man force could not attack through the village and hope to survive. At 1518, Reno ordered his men to dismount and form a skirmish line. One of every four troopers was designated to hold the horses. While the horses were secured in a stand of timber on the right flank of the line, the remaining 95 men spread 400 yards across the valley to the low bluff on the west. Within minutes, the entire line was under pressure from hundreds of warriors spilling out of the village. Soon the troopers were outnumbered five to one. Threatened with being flanked on his, left, Reno at 1533 ordered the line to withdraw into the timber. In the trees, Reno tried to form a perimeter, but he found that the area was too large for his small command to secure. By this time, his men were also running low on ammunition, and the only remaining supply was with the horses. The Indians now threatened to surround Reno and soon set the woods afire. In response, Reno ordered his men to mount and move upstream where they could cross to high ground on the east bank. At 1553, Reno led the retreat out of the timber, but the movement quickly degenerated into a rout. Many men did, not receive the order or were unable to withdraw and were left in the timber to fight in small pockets or hide until they could escape later. Those who made it out of the woods were forced to cross the Little Bighorn at a narrow, deep ford that caused them to cluster. Meanwhile, the Indians vigorously pressed their attack, inflicting heavy casualties on the panic-stricken soldiers struggling to reach safety beyond the river. At 1610, the first troops reached the hill that would later bear Reno’s name. More than forty dead and thirteen wounded troopers attested to the bloody fighting in the valley. Seventeen officers and men remained temporarily hidden in the trees west of the river. The Defense of Reno Hill: Having suffered grievous losses in the valley, Reno withdrew his men to the bluffs on the east bank of the Little Bighorn. The Sioux pursued them briefly, but by 1630, most of the warriors had broken contact with Reno and moved off to assist in destroying Custer’s force. Captain Frederick W. Benteen’s battalion and the pack train soon joined Reno atop the bluffs. From there, they could hear heavy and continuous firing to the north. While Reno and Benteen pondered their next move, Captain Thomas B. Weir initiated an advance by most of the command to a high point one mile to the northwest. Although this prominence (now known as Weir Point) offered an excellent view of the surrounding terrain, the cavalrymen learned little about Custer’s fate. To the west, they could see the valley of the Little Bighorn filled with tepees. To the north, they could see distant hills and ridges shrouded in dust, with occasional glimpses of Indians in the dust cloud, riding about and firing. They did not realize that they were witnessing Custer’s destruction. By 1710, most of the firing had ceased. Now dust clouds appeared all over the area as the Sioux and Cheyenne warriors converged on the remainder of the 7th Cavalry. With K Company acting as the rear guard, the column fell back to its original position on the bluffs and formed a perimeter defense. Animals and wounded men were gathered in a circular depression in the center of the position. The Indians rapidly surrounded the-bluecoats and began long-range sniping at Reno’s men. While vexing, the Indians’ fire caused few casualties, and the soldiers’ firepower stopped all enemy charges. Darkness finally stopped the fighting at 2100. While the Indians withdrew to the village to celebrate their great victory, the troopers strengthened their position with improvised tools. This day’s action followed the same pattern as that of the previous day, The Indians continued their long-range sniping, supplemented by occasional charges. This time, Indian fire inflicted considerably more casualties. (On the hill, Reno lost forty-eight men killed and wounded on the 26th, compared to just eleven on the 25th.) Improved Indian fire may have persuaded Benteen to conduct some limited counterattacks. Seeing a large band of Indians massing near the south end of his position, he led H Company in a charge that quickly scattered the attackers. Benteen then persuaded Reno to order a general advance in all directions, This attack also succeeded in driving the Indians back and gained some relief from enemy fire, But the relief was only temporary. As the sun rose and the day grew warmer, the lack of water became a serious problem, especially for the wounded men lying without cover in the hot Montana sun. A plea from Dr. Henry R. Porter, the 7th Cavalry’s only surviving physician, prompted Benteen to seek volunteers to go for water. Covered by sharpshooters, a party of soldiers made its way down what is now called Water Carriers’ Ravine to the river and succeeded in bringing water back for the wounded. By late afternoon, the Sioux and Cheyenne appeared to be losing interest in the battle. Frustrated by their inability to finish off the bluecoats and apparently satisfied with what they had already accomplished, the Indians began to withdraw. While some warriors kept the soldiers pinned down, the Indians in the valley broke camp and set the prairie grass afire to hinder pursuit. At approximately 1900, Reno’s men saw the huge band move upriver toward a new campsite in the Bighorn Mountains. Although unmolested following the Indian withdrawal, Reno stayed in his hilltop position the night of the 26th. The following morning, Terry’s column arrived and informed Reno and Benteen of Custer’s fate. Custer’s Final Approaches: As Custer watered his horses at the north fork of Reno Creek, he confronted an altered situation, From the orders he had given Reno, it appears that he had originally intended to reinforce Reno’s charge in the valley. Now that he knew the Indians were fighting, not running, he may have felt he needed to support Reno by attacking the Sioux village from a different direction. While he hoped at any moment to see Benteen’s command riding into sight, the urgency of the situation meant he could not wait. Consequently, Custer turned his battalion northwest to follow the bluff line on the right bank of the Little Bighorn River. Apparently, he was seeking access to the river farther downstream in order to make a flank attack on the village. Custer’s force climbed to the crest of Reno Hill, where he gained his first glimpse of the valley. He could see Reno’s command still making its charge and could view the southern edge of the largest Indian village any of the veteran soldiers had ever seen. In fact, the village contained up to 1,000 lodges and 7,120 people, including 1,800 warriors. The sight of so many fighting warriors convinced Custer that he needed Benteen’s command and the extra ammunition on the pack train immediately. He detached Sergeant Daniel Kanipe to Benteen with the message to move the train hurriedly cross-country: “If packs get loose, don’t stop to fix them, cut them off. Come quick. Big Indian camp.” But he had no time to wait for Benteen and the pack train; he had to continue his trek northwest. Just beyond Reno Hill, he descended into Cedar Coulee, still attempting to gain access to the river and hoping that his approach would be shielded from the Indians’ view. Halting the command at a bend in the coulee, Custer rode to the crest of Weir Point with several scouts, including Mitch Boyer and the Indian, Curly. From Weir Point, the small party could see that Reno’s command had dismounted and was forming a skirmish line. If Reno could hold his position, Custer’s command might gain enough time to become engaged. From Weir Point, Custer could also see that Cedar Coulee joined another ravine (Medicine Tail Coulee) that would at last give him access to the river. Leaving Curly and Boyer on Weir Point to watch Reno’s fight, Custer rejoined his command. After sending a trumpeter, John Martin, with another message for Benteen to bring the ammunition packs forward, he led the command down Cedar Coulee and into Medicine Tail Coulee. After Custer’s departure from Weir Point, Curly and Boyer saw Reno’s skirmish line defeated and driven into the woods. Knowing the importance of this information, the two scouts descended Weir Point to rendezvous with Custer’s column. On learning of Reno’s defeat in the valley, Custer was forced to change plans yet again. Without Benteen or the ammunition packs, he had to attack now to relieve the pressure on Reno’s command. Custer’s Last Stand: Having learned from Boyer and Curly that Reno’s force was in serious trouble, Custer knew that he had to act immediately. Apparently intending to distract the Indians at his end of the village, Custer split his battalion into two parts: E and F Companies (76 men) under the command of Captain George W. Yates and C, I, and L Companies (134 men) under Custer. He sent Yates’ command down Medicine Tail Coulee to the ford to make a feint against the village. Custer led the remainder of the force up the north side of Medicine Tail Coulee to Luce Ridge (see map A). From there, Custer’s three companies could support Yates should he get into serious trouble, and at the same time, Custer could wait for Benteen’s battalion and the pack train. Yates made his charge toward the river and alarmed the village. Briefly, as the Indians recovered from their surprise, Yates’ command was able to fire across the river relatively unopposed. The Indians soon rallied, however, and some began to pressure Yates frontally while others ascended Medicine Tail Coulee. From his position on Luce Ridge, Custer’s men poured a heavy volley of fire into the advancing warriors. As Yates began to withdraw up Deep Coulee, Custer saw the necessity of reuniting his command. While Yates ascended Deep Coulee, Custer left Luce Ridge and crossed both Nye-Cartwright Ridge and Deep Coulee to the reunion point near Calhoun Hill. After the five companies rejoined on Calhoun Hill, the pressure from the Indians intensified. At this point, Mitch Boyer convinced Curly to leave the doomed command, while Boyer stayed with Custer. After Curly’s exit, descriptions of Custer’s fight are necessarily conjecture. The accounts by John S. Gray offer the most reasonable hypothesis about the battle from this point and are buttressed by the physical evidence-the placement of bodies, the location of artifacts, and the terrain. Calhoun Hill was not a good defensive position. The surrounding ground was very broken, giving the Indians myriad concealed approaches from which to launch attacks. The mounting pressure on the soldiers ultimately forced them off the hill in the only reasonable direction, northwest along what is now called Custer Ridge (see map B). Lieutenant James Calhoun’s L Company remained as the rear guard, enabling the rest of the command to withdraw. When it became apparent that Calhoun’s men were about to be overwhelmed, Captain Myles W. Keogh’s I Company turned back to reinforce them and was also overrun. The remainder of Custer’s troopers reached Custer’s Hill, but against such enormous odds, no amount of gallantry could have saved the command. As the Indians swarmed about Custer’s small force, the intense pressure forced some of the men to withdraw southwest toward Deep Ravine, forming what has been called the south skirmish line. From there, the few remaining troopers fled in isolation and were cut down, one by one, until no one remained alive. Custer’s battle was over, but the legend of Custer’s last stand was only beginning. The Sioux Dispersal, July-September 1876: News of Custer’s debacle at the Little Bighorn paralyzed Crook’s and Terry’s columns for over a month. The great Sioux camp dispersed shortly after the battle. Most of the bands withdrew to the southwest toward the Bighorn Mountains, satisfied with their great victory. After a few weeks of celebration in the mountains, the major bands headed northeast onto the prairie. Sitting Bull’s band traveled to the northeast, Long Dog’s people eventually moved northwest, and Crazy Horse’s people returned eastward to the Black Hills. With the possible exception of Crazy Horse’s band, which launched a few small-scale raids against miners in the Black Hills, the Sioux and Cheyenne appeared to have little interest in continuing the fight. Most of the Indians assumed that their overwhelming victory over Custer would cause the Army to give up the campaign-at least for a time. The inactivity of Crook and Terry following the battle seemed to support this view. Of course, the disaster at the Little Bighorn would have precisely the opposite effect on the U.S. Army’s intentions. Both Crook and Terry called for and received substantial reinforcements. They finally got underway again in early August-but only after Indian trails in their respective vicinities had aged a month or more. On 10 August, the two forces met along the banks of the Rosebud, after initially mistaking each other for the enemy. The two commanders combined their already ponderous columns into a single expedition and proceeded northeast down the Tongue River valley. This huge host quickly exhausted its rations and halted along the Powder River to await additional supplies. With his command only partially resupplied, Crook set out due east on 22 August in one last attempt to salvage something from the campaign. By 8 September, Crook had succeeded only in exhausting and nearly starving his troopers. But on 9 September, a detachment from his column found a small Indian village at Slim Buttes and promptly attacked it. Crook’s troopers inflicted few casualties but succeeded in capturing the camp and a small but welcome supply of buffalo meat. The following day, 200 to 300 warriors from Crazy Horse’s band counterattacked Crook’s 2,000 effectives. Although badly outnumbered, the Sioux occupied the high ground and fought Crook’s exhausted men to a standstill. Following this inconclusive engagement, Crook made no effort to pursue the Indians but concentrated solely on getting his command back to a regular supply source. On 13 September, Crook finally obtained supplies from Crook City in the Black Hills, ending his men’s ordeal. Meanwhile, Terry’s force proceeded north to the Yellowstone, pursuing another cold trail. Terry encountered no Indians and quickly gave up the chase. A detachment under Reno briefly pursued Long Dog’s band north of the Missouri but soon abandoned the effort and proceeded to Fort Buford. Perhaps the most important developments of the campaign took place far from the scene of action. Shocked by news of the Battle of the Little Bighorn, Congress passed the Sioux appropriation bill, which forced the Sioux to cede their remaining lands and withdraw to a specified reservation on the west bank of the Missouri. At the same time, General Sheridan dealt harshly with the agency Indians, confiscating all of their weapons and ponies. Without guns or horses, the agency Indians could no longer reinforce the hostile bands. Dwindling food supplies and constant harassment by the Army eventually forced the Sioux to surrender. The Final Actions, October 1876-May 1877: While Crook and Terry no longer pursued the Indians, Colonel Nelson A. Miles, commander of the 5th Infantry Regiment, asked for and received permission to conduct independent operations. He continued chasing the northward-bound Sioux without pause. He caught up with Sitting Bull’s band in early autumn and succeeded in destroying some of its winter stores and camp equipment. The Indians now expected Miles to return to winter quarters, but he established a cantonment at the mouth of the Tongue River and harried the Sioux from this base throughout the fall and winter. Unlike other units, the soldiers of the 5th Infantry were thoroughly conditioned and equipped for their winter campaign on the harsh northern plains. Setting out on 5 November, Miles’ troops began a search of the country between the Yellowstone and Missouri Rivers. Miles marched north to Fort Peck on the Missouri, then divided his command into three columns and proceeded to comb the landscape again. On 7 December, the detachment under Lieutenant Frank D. Baldwin attacked Sitting Bull’s force and drove it across the Missouri. To escape Miles and his inexhaustible “walkaheaps,” Sitting Bull and Long Dog led their people into Canada. While Miles harassed the northern bands, Crook launched a new expedition from Fort Fetterman on 14 November. With over 2,000 Regulars and 400 Indian scouts, he proceeded northward and located Dull Knife’s Cheyenne village at the base of the Bighorn Mountains. On 25 November, Crook’s men attacked the village, achieving complete surprise. The Cheyenne fled for their lives, leaving their ponies, teepees, and food. Having exposed the Cheyenne to the elements, Crook returned to Fort Fetterman and let freezing temperatures and starvation finish the job of subduing the hostiles. On 29 December, Miles resumed his campaign, marching up the Tongue River valley. Encountering Crazy Horse’s camp on 1 January, Miles fought several skirmishes that culminated in the Battle of Wolf Mountain on 8 January 1877. While the soldiers caused relatively few casualties, they inflicted disastrous losses of food and camp equipment on the Indians. Miles and Crook spent the remainder of the winter sending messengers to Crazy Horse to persuade him to surrender. Although Crazy Horse and his band held out until spring, starvation and exposure caused many Sioux to drift back to the agencies. Miles encountered the last major group of hostiles, Lame Deer’s band, on 7 May 1877, inflicting a crushing defeat on them. His troops captured nearly 500 ponies and some 30 tons of meat and killed at least 14 warriors including Lame Deer himself. Sitting Bull and his followers managed to survive in Canada for a time, but the disappearance of the buffalo had made starvation a constant threat. Finally, on 19 July 1881, Sitting Bull surrendered to the Army at Fort Buford. He continued to resist passively, however, tirelessly demanding fair and dignified treatment for his people. In 1890, Sitting Bull embraced the Ghost Dance, which gave agency authorities an excuse to imprison him. On 15 December 1890, tribal police shot and killed Sitting Bull when he and his supporters resisted arrest. Two weeks later, on 29 December 1890, the Army destroyed the last vestiges of armed Sioux resistance at Wounded Knee. The Sioux War was over.
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [87828]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [87829]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [87830]

Event
Type: Honors
Date: Aft 1942
Place: War (1941-1946) (World War II)
See source 8 for this person
Extracted text: Liberty ship #2967 - USS Anson Mills Liberty Ships were built by the United States Maritime Commission in World War II. Liberty ship was the name given to the EC2 type ship designed for “Emergency” construction by the United States Maritime Commission in World War II. Liberty ships, nicknamed “ugly ducklings” by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt The first of the 2,751 Liberty ships was the SS Patrick Henry, launched on Sept. 27, 1941, and built to a standardized, mass produced design. The 250,000 parts were pre-fabricated throughout the country in 250-ton sections and welded together in about 70 days. One Liberty ship, the SS Robert E. Peary was built in four and a half days. A Liberty cost under $2,000,000. The Liberty was 441 feet long and 56 feet wide. Her three-cylinder, reciprocating steam engine, fed by two oil-burning boilers produced 2,500 hp and a speed of 11 knots. Her 5 holds could carry over 9,000 tons of cargo, plus airplanes, tanks, and locomotives lashed to its deck. A Liberty could carry 2,840 jeeps, 440 tanks, or 230 million rounds of rifle ammunition. Libertys carried a crew of about 44 and 12 to 25 Naval Armed Guard.
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [87862]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [87863]
See source 8 for this person
Extracted text: In Lebanon, Boone County, Indiana stands a bronze fountain placed by General Anson Mills in tribute to his parents James and Sarah Mills. Erected in 1909.
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [87870]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [87871]

Media link
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 2 _SCBK Y [87879]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 2 _PRIM Y [87880]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 2 _TYPE PHOTO [87881]

Sources for Brigadier General Anson Mills United States Army:

Source 1
Title: 1860 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1860 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
MEDI: Book
ABBR: “Encyclopedia of American Biography of the Nineteenth

Source 3
Title: “The War of the Rebellion: a compilation of the official records of the Union and Confederate armies. / Series 1 - Volume 38 (Part I)”
ABBR: “The War of the Rebellion: a compilation of the official records of the Union and Confederate armies. / Series 1 - Volume 38 (Part I)”
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 4
Title: United States Military Medal - The Civil War Campaign Medal - Army
Extracted Text: Criteria: Service between 15 April 1861 and 9 April 1865, or in Texas between 15 April 1861 and 20 August 1866.
ABBR: United States Military Medal - The Civil War Campaign Medal - Army
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 5
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 6
Title: War (1865-1891) (Indian Wars)
ABBR: War (1865-1891) (Indian Wars)
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 7
Title: “Atlas of the Sioux Wars”
Publication: Combat Studies Institute
U.S. Army Command and General Staff College
Fort Leavenworth, Kansas

Compiled by
Dr. William Glenn Robertson
Dr. Jerold E. Brown
Major William M. Campsey
Major Scott R. McMeen
MEDI: Military
ABBR: “Atlas of the Sioux Wars”
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 8
Title: Notes of Clarence & Rene Dillman
ABBR: Notes of Art & Rene Dillman
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Hannah Cassel:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3641@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Northampton, Virginia, Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington [87984]


Issue of 6David Kenworthy [42] (5Lucretia Skeen [16], 4Lydia Stroud [9], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Sarah Ann Burkhalter

118. 7William A. Kenworthy, son of 6David Kenworthy [42] and Sarah Ann Burkhalter. Born on 23 May 1841 in Thorntown, Boone, Indiana. Died on 28 May 1893 in Lebanon, Boone, Indiana, 52 years old.

Married Sophronia Haun. Sophronia Haun b. about 1845 in Indiana.

Issue of William A. Kenworthy and Sophronia Haun:

      i. son 8Harry L. Kenworthy b. about 1870 in Lebanon.

Notes on William A. Kenworthy:

Census
Date: 1880
Place: Lebanon, Boone, Indiana
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0266, Page Number 137D
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: William A. KENWORTHY Self M Male W 39 IN Retired Merchant OH IN Sophina H. KENWORTHY Wife M Female W 35 IN Keeping House VA TN Harry L. KENWORTHY Son S Male W 10 IN IN IN Sarah KENWORTHY Other W Female W 64 IN No Occupation NC NC Lena HARDEN Other S Female W 24 IN House Keeper VA TN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [930145]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [930146]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [930147]

Sources for William A. Kenworthy:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

119. 7Thomas Perry Kenworthy, son of 6David Kenworthy [42] and Sarah Ann Burkhalter. Born on 11 April 1843 in Thorntown, Boone, Indiana. Died on 18 Nov. 1913 in Albuquerque, Bernalillo, New Mexico, USA, 70 years old. Buried in Boone, Indiana, Oakhill Cemetery.

Married first Sarah ’Sallie’ Catherine Ulm, , on 10 June 1873 in Clinton, Indiana when 30 years old (Sarah ’Sallie’ Catherine was 28 years old). Sarah ’Sallie’ Catherine Ulm b. on 4 Feb. 1845 in Rossville, Clinton, Indiana; d. on 16 Oct. 1883, 38 years old.

Issue of Thomas Perry Kenworthy and Sarah ’Sallie’ Catherine Ulm:

      i. son 8Lyle Kenworthy b. about 1877.

Married second Josephine Ulm, , on 27 Sep. 1884 in Grant City, Worth, Missouri, USA when 41 years old (Josephine was 26 years old). Josephine Ulm b. on 24 Nov. 1857 in Rossville; d. on 3 March 1954 in Monterey Park, Los Angeles, California, 96 years old.

Issue of Thomas Perry Kenworthy and Josephine Ulm:

      ii. dau. 8Mary B. Kenworthy b. in Jan. 1887 in Kansas.
      iii. son Darwen L. Kenworthy b. in June 1888 in Kansas.

Notes on Thomas Perry Kenworthy:

Death
See source 1 for this person

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I60956@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Boone, Indiana, Oakhill Cemetery, Lebanon [930240]

Notes for the family of Thomas Perry Kenworthy and Sarah ’Sallie’ Catherine Ulm:

See source 1 for this familyExtracted text: Kenworthy Thomas P. Sallie C Ulm June 10 1873 C-5 373

Sources for Thomas Perry Kenworthy:

Source 1
Title: Boone County, Indiana Index to Death Records A-Z 1882-1920Kenworthy Thomas P 70 Nov 20 1913 Albuquerque H-6 62.
ABBR: Boone County, Indiana Index to Death Records A-Z 1882-1920Kenworthy Thomas P 70 Nov 20 1913 Albuquerque H-6 62.
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Thomas Perry Kenworthy and Sarah ’Sallie’ Catherine Ulm:

Source 1
Title: Clinton County, Indiana Index to Marriage Records A-K 1852-1905
ABBR: Clinton County, Indiana Index to Marriage Records A-K 1852-1905
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Sarah ’Sallie’ Catherine Ulm:

Birth
See source 1 for this person

Sources for Sarah ’Sallie’ Catherine Ulm:

Source 1
Title: 1860 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1860 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Josephine Ulm:

Event: Alt. Birth
Type: Alt. Birth
Date: 24 NOV 1857
Place: Rossville, Clinton, Indiana


Issue of Joshua Routh and 6Lydia Skeen [45] (5John Skeen [17], 4Lydia Stroud [9], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1])

120. 7Lydia Routh, dau. of Joshua Routh and 6Lydia Skeen [45]. Born in 1854 in Tippecanoe, Indiana.

Married Albert Culbertson, son of Lewis Culbertson and Jane Gallagher, in 1870 when 15 or 16 years old (Albert was about 20 years old). Albert Culbertson b. about 1850 in Tippecanoe.

Issue of Lydia Routh and Albert Culbertson:

      i. son 8Joshua A. Culbertson b. on 10 April 1873 in Marion, Linn, Iowa; d. on 11 April 1873 in Marion, a day old.
216   ii. son John Orville Culbertson b. on 18 Sep. 1889.
      iii. dau. Dove E. Culbertson b. on 7 July 1890.
      iv. son Warren R. Culbertson b. on 27 June 1892; d. in Aug. 1968 in Dallas City, Hancock, Illinois, 76 years old; m. _____ Rhoda.
      v. dau. Daisy M. Culbertson b. on 15 May 1894; d. in June 1977 in Pleasantville, Marion, Iowa, 83 years old; m. Arthur Patch.
      vi. dau. Lydia Jane Culbertson b. on 15 March 1897; m. Eric Blake.

Notes on Albert Culbertson:

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Marion, Iowa, Pleasant Grove
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0354, Page Number 565A
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Joshua ROUTH Self W Male W 65 OH Retired Farmer NC TN Joshua ROUTH Son S Male W 17 IA Farms OH OH Alexander CULBERTSON SonL M Male W 33 OH Farms OH OH Lydia CULBERTSON Dau M Female W 25 IN Keeping House OH OH
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [88053]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [88054]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [88055]

Sources for Albert Culbertson:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of 6Julian Stroud [47] (5Isham (Isom) Stroud [18], 4John Stroud [10], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Mariah Blackburn

121. 7William H. Stroud, son of 6Julian Stroud [47] and Mariah Blackburn. Born about 1842 in Orange, Indiana. Died in 1901, about 59 years old.

Married first Rachel Tucker on 10 Nov. 1864 in Crawford when about 22 years old (Rachel was 19 years old). Rachel Tucker b. on 18 Dec. 1844 in Indiana; d. on 7 Jan. 1897, 52 years old; bur. in Crawford, Indiana, Highfill Chapel Cemetery.

Issue of William H. Stroud and Rachel Tucker:

      i. son 8Jessie L. Stroud b. about 1866 in Indiana.
      ii. son Isom Stroud b. about 1868.
217   iii. dau. Mary A. Stroud b. in Oct. 1879 in Indiana.
      iv. dau. Mariam Stroud b. about 1879.

Married second Mary A. _____.

Notes on William H. Stroud:

Event: - Union Army, 23rd Reg Indiana Volunteers
Type: Military Service
Place: War (1861-1865) (Civil)
Note:
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): dependent mother’s pension for Maria Stroud (application 23
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 4 CONC 7,890 certificate [84929]
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 14 SEP 1886 [84931]
Note: William Stroud, born in 1841, he had to do for himself mostly from the timehe was able to do so, he married in 1864, he was in the army, 23 Reg. Ind.Vols. Co. G and was wounded at Vicksburg 1863;
Extracted text: William H. Stroud (First_Last) Regiment Name 23 Indiana Infantry Side Union Company G Soldier’s Rank_In Pvt Soldier’s Rank_Out Pvt Alternate Name Notes Film Number M540 roll 75

Event
Type: Pension Roll
Date: AUG 1864
Place: Indiana
Note: Applied for and was awarded a pension for service during the Civil War.
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): William H. Stroud, Cert# 88.338
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Media format: jpg
Media file: William H. Stroud.jpg
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [84962]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [84963]

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Patoka Township
See source 3 for this person
Page(s): Page 15 Line 110
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [84970]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [84971]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [84972]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Patoka Township
See source 4 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0271, Page Number 368A
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Wm. H. STROUD Self M Male W 39 IN Farming IN IN Rachel STROUD Wife M Female W 35 IN Keeping House KY IN Jesse L. STROUD Son Male W 14 IN At Home IN IN Isom STROUD Son S Male W 12 IN At Home IN IN Mary A. STROUD Dau S Female W 9 IN IN IN Miriam STROUD Son S Male W 1 IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [84992]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [84993]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [84994]

Notes for the family of William H. Stroud and Rachel Tucker:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C page 161Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by John Laswell, JP.

Sources for William H. Stroud:

Source 1
Title: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 23rd Infantry Reg’t, Indiana
Extracted Text: Regimental History Twenty-third Infantry INDIANA (3 years)

Twenty-third Infantry. Cols., William L. Sanderson, George S. Babbitt; Lieut.-Cols. DeWitt C. Anthony, William P. Davis, George S. Babbitt; Majs., William P. Davis, Henry C. Ferguson.

This regiment was organized at New Albany and was mustered in July 29, 1861. It left the state a few days later, for St. Louis and was ordered thence to Paducah, Ky.

In the attack on Fort Henry the regiment was placed on gunboats and several of Co. B were killed by an exploding boiler on the Essex. The regiment was engaged on the second day of the battle of Shiloh, losing 52, killed, wounded and missing, and during the siege of Corinth it formed part of the reserve at Pea Ridge.

It passed the summer at Bolivar and participated in the recapture of Iuka in September. It was then in various movements until Feb. 21, 1863, when it proceeded to Vicksburg. It was engaged in the various movements about that place, being at the battles of Port Gibson and Raymond, making a charge at the later place and capturing a number of prisoners, but losing a third of the number engaged. It was also at Champion’s hill and joined in the attack and capture of Jackson.

It was in the front line at the siege of Vicksburg, losing during the time 55 in killed and wounded. It was not actively engaged during the fall and winter following, but was in a raid through Mississippi in February.

It reenlisted at Hebron, Miss., during the winter and at the end of its furlough moved successively to Bird’s Point, Mo., Clifton, Tenn., and Acworth Ga. It was in battle or skirmish almost daily during the advance on Atlanta; pursued Hood through Alabama and Georgia in October; and then returned to join the move on Savannah.

From this point it marched with its corps to Beaufort, S. C., and in Jan. 1865, took part in the campaign of the Carolinas, being engaged at Bentonville and reaching Goldsboro on March After Johnston’s surrender it marched to Washington City and thence to Louisville, where it was mustered out July 23, 1865.

Its original strength was 1,050; gain by recruits, 477; reenlistments, 277; unassigned recruits, 36; total, 1,840. Loss by death, 154, desertion, 99; unaccounted for, 273.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 3

Battles Fought

Fought on 06 February 1862 at Fort Henry, TN. Fought on 12 May 1863 at Raymond, MS. Fought on 19 June 1863 at Vicksburg, MS. Fought on 03 July 1863 at Vicksburg, MS. Fought on 11 June 1864 at Kenesaw Mountain, GA. Fought on 13 June 1864 at Kenesaw Mountain, GA. Fought on 16 June 1864 at Kenesaw Mountain, GA. Fought on 20 June 1864 at Kenesaw Mountain, GA. Fought on 03 July 1864 at Nickajack Creek, GA. Fought on 20 August 1864 at Atlanta, GA.
ABBR: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 23rd Infantry Reg’t, Indiana
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: Pension records
ABBR: Pension records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 3
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 4
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of William H. Stroud and Rachel Tucker:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Rachel Tucker:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3813@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Highfill Chapel Cemetery, Taswell [90933]

Notes on Mary A. _____:

Event
Type: Pension Roll
Date: MAY 1901
Place: Indiana
Note: Applied for and was awarded a widows pension for Williams’ service during the Civil War.
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Mary A. Stroud, Cert# 860.520
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Media format: jpg
Media file: William H. Stroud.jpg
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [767551]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [767552]

Sources for Mary A. _____:

Source 1
Title: Pension records
ABBR: Pension records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

122. 7Samuel J. Stroud, son of 6Julian Stroud [47] and Mariah Blackburn. Born in May 1844 in Orange, Indiana.

Married Marguerite A. Jenkins on 13 Aug. 1872 in Crawford when 28 years old (Marguerite A. was about 17 years old). Marguerite A. Jenkins b. about 1855 in Indiana.

Issue of Samuel J. Stroud and Marguerite A. Jenkins:

218   i. son 8William H. Stroud b. in 1873 in Indiana.
      ii. son Charles Walter Stroud b. in July 1879 in Crawford; d. before 1944, at most 64 years old.
219   iii. dau. Rose Ada Stroud b. on 11 Oct. 1886.
220   iv. dau. Martha Elizabeth Stroud b. in Aug. 1882 in Crawford.

Notes on Samuel J. Stroud:

Notes for the family of Samuel J. Stroud and Marguerite A. Jenkins:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C page 619Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by Joseph Boyd, MG.

Sources for the family of Samuel J. Stroud and Marguerite A. Jenkins:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

123. 7Clary Elizabeth Stroud, dau. of 6Julian Stroud [47] and Mariah Blackburn. Born in July 1854 in Crawford, Indiana.

Married Leander Sevedge, son of John Sevedge and Fanny Minerva Downs, on 9 Jan. 1879 in Orange when 24 years old (Leander was 18 or 19 years old). Leander Sevedge b. in 1860 in Indiana; d. on 15 March 1900 in Orange, 39 or 40 years old.

Issue of Clary Elizabeth Stroud and Leander Sevedge:

221   i. son 8John W. Sevedge b. about 1880 in Indiana.

Notes on Leander Sevedge:

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0302, Page Number 96C
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Leander SEVEDGE Self M Male W 20 IN Farming IN IN Clara E. SEVEDGE Wife M Female W 26 IN House Keeping IN IN John W. SEVEDGE Son S Male W 8M IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [1051906]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [1051907]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [1051908]

Notes for the family of Leander Sevedge and Clary Elizabeth Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C-7, page 39Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Sources for Leander Sevedge:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Leander Sevedge and Clary Elizabeth Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of Ogleby Sevedge and 6Catharine Stroud [48] (5Isham (Isom) Stroud [18], 4John Stroud [10], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1])

124. 7Sarah Sevedge, dau. of Ogleby Sevedge and 6Catharine Stroud [48]. Born about 1840 in Indiana.

Married Jacob Haskins, son of Daniel Haskins and Sarah Weedman.

Issue of Sarah Sevedge and Jacob Haskins:

      i. dau. 8Catherine Haskins b. in 1868.
      ii. son John R. Haskins b. in 1871.

125. 7Isom Sevedge, son of Ogleby Sevedge and 6Catharine Stroud [48]. Born about 1830 in Indiana.

Married Susan Jane Shaffer. Susan Jane Shaffer b. about 1829 in Indiana.

Issue of Isom Sevedge and Susan Jane Shaffer:

222   i. dau. 8Nancy Jane Sevedge b. on 6 May 1870.
      ii. dau. Rebecca Sevedge b. on 18 Sep. 1874 in Milltown, Crawford, Indiana; d. on 1 March 1965, 90 years old.

Notes on Isom Sevedge:

Census
Date: 1860
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 63, Line 449
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Sources for Isom Sevedge:

Source 1
Title: 1860 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1860 US Census
_PAREN: Y


Issue of William Key and 6Sarah Stroud [49] (5Isham (Isom) Stroud [18], 4John Stroud [10], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1])

126. 7Lucinda Key, dau. of William Key and 6Sarah Stroud [49]. Born in June 1836 in Orange, Indiana. Died on 20 Dec. 1919 in Crawford, 83 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Mathers Cemetery.

Married James Dooley, son of John Dooley and Sarah Jane Denbo, on 23 Nov. 1852 in Crawford when 16 years old (James was 21 years old). James Dooley b. on 25 March 1831 in Crawford; d. on 16 April 1878 in Crawford, 47 years old; bur. in Crawford.

Issue of Lucinda Key and James Dooley:

223   i. dau. 8Sarah A. Dooley b. in 1854 in Crawford.
224   ii. dau. Winifred Lucinda Dooley b. in 1856 in Crawford.
225   iii. son John William Dooley b. on 11 March 1858 in Crawford.
226   iv. dau. Mary Dooley b. in 1868 in Crawford.
      v. dau. Nancy Dooley b. in 1870 in Crawford.
227   vi. dau. Alice Dooley b. in 1873 in Crawford.
      vii. son James Dooley b. in Jan. 1875 in Crawford.
228   viii. son George W. Dooley b. in 1879 in Crawford.

Notes on Lucinda Key:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3568@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Mathers Cemetery, English [85183]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0271, Page Number 372C
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Lucinda DOOLEY Self W Female W 44 IN Keeping House TN IN Mary DOOLEY Dau S Female W 12 IN IN IN Elizabeth DOOLEY Dau S Female W 10 IN IN IN Allice DOOLEY Dau S Female W 7 IN IN IN James DOOLEY Son S Male W 4 IN IN IN George W. DOOLEY Son S Male W 1 IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [85200]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [85201]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [85202]

Census
Date: 1910
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): District 34, page 4, line 41
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Living alone age 74.

Sources for Lucinda Key:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1910 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, actual images of the 1910 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, T624, 1784 rolls may be browsed by selecting a state, county, township, and enumeration district.
Enumerators of the 1910 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; relationship to head of family; age at last birthday; sex; color or race; whether single, married, widowed, or divorced; number of years of present marriage; number of children born; number of children now living; birthplace; mother tongue; birthplace of father and mother; mother tongue of father and mother; year of immigration to the U.S.; whether naturalized or alien; whether able to speak English, or if not, give language spoken; trade or profession; industry; whether employer, employee, or working on own account; if an employee, whether out of work on April 15, 1910; if an employee, number of weeks out of work during year 1909, whether able to read; whether able to write; attended school any time since September 1, 1909; home owned or rented; home owned free or mortgaged; farm or house; number of farm schedule; whether a survivor of the Union or Confederate Army or Navy; whether blind; whether deaf and dumb. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1910 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on James Dooley:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3577@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Mathers Cemetery, English [85497]

Event
Type: Cemetery
Date: 1860
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): page 85, Line 599
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Event: - Union Army, Co G, 66th Indiana Infantry Volunteers
Type: Military Service
Place: War (1861-1865) (Civil)
See source 2 for this person
Extracted text: James Dooley (First_Last) Regiment Name 66 Indiana Infantry Side Union Company G Soldier’s Rank_In Priv. Soldier’s Rank_Out Priv. Alternate Name Notes Film Number M540 roll 20
Media format: jpg
Media file: James Dooley.jpg

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township
See source 3 for this person
Page(s): Page 3, Line 25
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [85527]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [85528]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [85529]

Sources for James Dooley:

Source 1
Title: 1860 US Census
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1860 US Census
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 66th Infantry Reg’t, Indiana
Extracted Text: Regimental History Sixty-sixth Infantry INDIANA (3-YEARS)

Sixty-sixth Infantry. -- Cols., Lewis Wallace, De Witt C. Anthony, Roger Martin; Lieut.-Cols., Roger Martin, Thomas G. Morrison; Majs. John W. Gerard, Thomas G. Morrison.

This regiment was organized at New Albany and was mustered in Aug. 19, 1862. It left the state the same day for Lexington, Ky., where Lieut.-Col. Martin assumed command, Gen. Wallace having been commissioned provisional colonel at the time of the muster-in and being assigned on reaching Lexington to the command of the troops then concentrating at Covington and Cincinnati.

The regiment was engaged in the battle of Richmond, Ky., the greater part of it being captured and paroled. The paroled men and the remainder of the regiment were ordered to New Albany. An exchange was made in November, when, under command of Col. Anthony the regiment moved to Corinth, where it was assigned to the 1st brigade of Dodge’s division, remaining as part of the garrison until Aug. 18, 1863.

It then moved to Collierville, Tenn., where Cos. B, C, D, E, G and I were engaged in October, and on Oct. 29 moved for Pulaski, where it passed the winter. On April 29, 1864, the regiment marched to Chattanooga, and from there formed a junction with Sherman’s army for the Atlanta campaign, being engaged at Resaca, Lay’s Ferry, Rome cross-roads, Dallas, Kennesaw Mountain, before Atlanta, and at Jonesboro.

On Sept. 26 it took the train with its division for Rome, GA, but later rejoined the army at Atlanta and moved with it for Savannah. It marched through the Carolinas and Virginia to Washington and was mustered out there on June 3, 1865. The recruits were transferred to the 59th and served with that regiment until its muster-out.

The original strength of the 66th was 1,017; gain by recruits, 101; total, 1,118. Loss by death, 234; desertion, 32; unaccounted for, 15.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 3

Battles Fought

Fought on 30 August 1862 at Richmond, KY. Fought on 11 October 1863 at Collierville, TN. Fought on 14 May 1864 at Resaca, GA. Fought on 27 May 1864 at Dallas, GA. Fought on 28 May 1864 at Dallas, GA. Fought on 22 July 1864 at Atlanta, GA. Fought on 09 August 1864 at Atlanta, GA. Fought on 11 August 1864 at Atlanta, GA. Fought on 29 August 1864 at Atlanta, GA. Fought on 31 August 1864.
ABBR: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 66th Infantry Reg’t, Indiana
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 3
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

127. 7Theophilus Key, son of William Key and 6Sarah Stroud [49]. Born on 5 Sep. 1839 in Orange, Indiana. Died on 17 March 1915 in Marengo, Crawford, Indiana, USA, 75 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs.

Married Susannah Jones, dau. of Henry Jones and Margaret Crecelius (dau. of Jacob Crecelius and Christena _____), on 20 Dec. 1860 in Orange when 21 years old (Susannah was 19 years old). Susannah Jones b. on 11 Nov. 1841 in Crawford; d. on 21 April 1919 in Marengo, 77 years old.

Issue of Theophilus Key and Susannah Jones:

      i. dau. 8Eliza Key b. about 1863 in Indiana.
      ii. son Henry W. Key b. about 1869; d. after 1930.
      iii. dau. Della Key b. about 1870.
      iv. son Willard H. Key b. about 1871 in Indiana.
      v. son Millard Key b. about 1873.
      vi. son Arthur Key b. about 1874.
229   vii. son Perry Key b. about 1875.
230   viii. dau. Clara Bell Key b. on 30 Dec. 1879 in Pike.
      ix. dau. Metta Key b. about 1880; d. after 1930.

Notes on Theophilus Key:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3570@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs, Old Town) Cemetery, Marengo [85244]

Event: - Union Army, Company H, 13th Cavalry Regiment Indiana
Type: Military Service
Date: 28 JAN 1864-NOV 1865
Place: War (1861-1865) (Civil)
Note:
See source 1 for this person
Extracted text: Theophilus Key Residence: Marengo, IndianaOccupation: Service Record: Promoted to Full Sergeant. Enlisted as a Corporal on 28 January 1864. Enlisted in Company H, 13th Cavalry Regiment Indiana on 28 January 1864. Mustered out on 18 November 1865 in Vicksburg, MS. Sources:Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Indiana. (INRoster) Published in 1865-66 by Holloway

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): Page 11, Line 75
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [85267]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [85268]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [85269]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: Otwell, Pike, Indiana
See source 3 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0304, Page Number 220C
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Theophiles KEY Self M Male W 39 IN Laborer IN IN Susan KEY Other M Female W 38 IN Keeps House IN IN Willard KEY Other S Male W 12 IN Laborer IN IN Della KEY Other S Female W 10 IN IN IN Millard KEY Other S Male W 7 IN IN IN Arthur KEY Other S Male W 6 IN IN IN Perry KEY Other S Male W 5 IN IN IN Metta KEY Other S Female W 3 IN IN IN Clarra KEY Other S Female W 1 IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [85290]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [85291]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [85292]

Event: Applied for and was awarded pension fro his service during the Civil War.
Type: Pension Roll
Date: 1882
Place: Indiana
See source 4 for this person
Extracted text: Theophilus Key - Certificate 304.516
Media format: jpg
Media file: Theophilus Key.jpg

Census
Date: 1910
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty Township
See source 5 for this person
Page(s): Page 2 line 28
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Key, Theoplis, age 70, m 49 yrs , Susan, wie, age 68, m 49 yrs, 10 born 4 living , Henry, son, age 41 , Mettie, daughter, age 32

Sources for Theophilus Key:

Source 1
Title: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 13th Cavalry Reg’t, Indiana
Extracted Text: One Hundred and Thirty-first Regiment (13th Cavalry) INDIANA (3-YEARS)


One Hundred and Thirty-first Regiment (13th Cavalry). -- Col., Gilbert M. L. Johnson; Lieut.-Cols., William T. Pepper, Ranna S. Moore, Majs. Leonidas Stout, Ranna S. Moore, Hugh A. Stephens, Isaac DeLong John T. Wheeler, Joseph M. Stricker, David H. Wall.

This regiment was organized during the fall and winter of 1863-64, being the last cavalry organization formed in the state and the 131st of the line. It was mustered in April 29, 1864, and left the state on the 30th, proceeding to Nashville, where it was dismounted and given infantry arms and accouterments.

It was ordered to Huntsville, Ala., May 31 for garrison duty, being engaged in several skirmishes with bands of cavalry and on Oct. 1 it held the place against Buford’s entire command.

Cos. A, C, D, F. H and I, under Col. Johnson, proceeded to Louisville for the purpose of securing new mounts and equipments for the regiment. They were sent to Paducah to assist in repelling an attack by Forrest, which work having been performed they returned to Louisville, moving thence to Nashville, and marching to Lavergne to watch Hood’s movements.

Being cut off they retired upon Murfreesboro, participating in the battles of Overall’s creek, Wilkinson’s pike, and twelve skirmishes, losing 65 men in killed and wounded and 2 missing.

Cos. B. E, G. K, L and M, had moved in the meantime from Huntsville to Nashville, in command of Lieut.-Col. Pepper, and participated, dismounted, in the battle of Nashville. Immediately after this, joining the other six companies the entire regiment received new mounts and arms and was assigned to the 2nd brigade, 7th division, cavalry corps of the military division of the Mississippi.

The regiment proceeded down the river, Feb. 11, stopping at Vicksburg. From there it moved to Mobile, where it assisted in the operations against Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely, and engaged in running a courier line to Florida.

After the fall of Mobile it moved with Grierson’s command on the raid through Alabama, Georgia and Mississippi, reaching Columbus May 22. Proceeding to Macon, Miss., it garrisoned that point and patrolled the line of railroad for 60 miles, taking possession of a large amount of captured stores and ordnances.

It returned to Columbus June 6, and remained there until November, when it was ordered to Vicksburg, where it was mustered out Nov. 18, 1865. In June, 1865, Col. Johnson was assigned to the command of the sub-district of northeast Mississippi, and continued to hold that position until the muster-out of the regiment, being brevetted brigadier-general. The command of the regiment then devolved upon Lieut.-Col. Moore.

The original strength of the regiment was 1,157; gain by recruits, 236; total, 1,395. Loss by death, 136; desertion, 87; unaccounted for, 9.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 3, p. 185

Battles Fought

Fought on 30 September 1864 at Newmarket, AL. Fought on 04 December 1864 at Murfreesboro, TN. Fought on 04 December 1864 at Overall’s Creek, TN. Fought on 05 December 1864 at Murfreesboro, TN. Fought on 07 December 1864 at Murfreesboro, TN. Fought on 09 December 1864 at Murfreesboro, TN. Fought on 15 December 1864 at Murfreesboro, TN. Fought on 30 July 1865 at Siloam, MS. Fought on 12 October 1865 at Hyton, MS.
ABBR: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 13th Cavalry Reg’t, Indiana
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 3
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 4
Title: Pension records
ABBR: Pension records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 5
Title: 1910 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, actual images of the 1910 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, T624, 1784 rolls may be browsed by selecting a state, county, township, and enumeration district.
Enumerators of the 1910 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; relationship to head of family; age at last birthday; sex; color or race; whether single, married, widowed, or divorced; number of years of present marriage; number of children born; number of children now living; birthplace; mother tongue; birthplace of father and mother; mother tongue of father and mother; year of immigration to the U.S.; whether naturalized or alien; whether able to speak English, or if not, give language spoken; trade or profession; industry; whether employer, employee, or working on own account; if an employee, whether out of work on April 15, 1910; if an employee, number of weeks out of work during year 1909, whether able to read; whether able to write; attended school any time since September 1, 1909; home owned or rented; home owned free or mortgaged; farm or house; number of farm schedule; whether a survivor of the Union or Confederate Army or Navy; whether blind; whether deaf and dumb. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1910 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Susannah Jones:

Event
Type: Pension Roll
Date: MAR 1915
Place: Indiana
Note: Applied for and was awarded widows pension for Theophilus service during the Civil War.
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Certificate 790.236
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Media format: jpg
Media file: Theophilus Key.jpg

Sources for Susannah Jones:

Source 1
Title: Pension records
ABBR: Pension records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

128. 7John Key, son of William Key and 6Sarah Stroud [49]. Born about 1842 in Orange, Indiana.

Married Mary E. Redden on 23 March 1864 in Crawford when about 22 years old (Mary E. was about 18 years old). Mary E. Redden b. about 1846 in Indiana.

Issue of John Key and Mary E. Redden:

231   i. son 8_____ Key .
      ii. dau. Sarah A. Key b. in 1869.
      iii. dau. Mary Jane Key .

Notes on John Key:

Census
Date: 1910
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township, District 34
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 5, line 56
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Key, John H, head, age 69, M , Mary, wife, age 64, M , Nellie, granddaughter, age 18, S

Notes for the family of John Key and Mary E. Redden:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C page 127Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by Simon Monk, JP.

Sources for John Key:

Source 1
Title: 1910 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, actual images of the 1910 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, T624, 1784 rolls may be browsed by selecting a state, county, township, and enumeration district.
Enumerators of the 1910 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; relationship to head of family; age at last birthday; sex; color or race; whether single, married, widowed, or divorced; number of years of present marriage; number of children born; number of children now living; birthplace; mother tongue; birthplace of father and mother; mother tongue of father and mother; year of immigration to the U.S.; whether naturalized or alien; whether able to speak English, or if not, give language spoken; trade or profession; industry; whether employer, employee, or working on own account; if an employee, whether out of work on April 15, 1910; if an employee, number of weeks out of work during year 1909, whether able to read; whether able to write; attended school any time since September 1, 1909; home owned or rented; home owned free or mortgaged; farm or house; number of farm schedule; whether a survivor of the Union or Confederate Army or Navy; whether blind; whether deaf and dumb. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1910 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of John Key and Mary E. Redden:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

129. 7Joel Key, son of William Key and 6Sarah Stroud [49]. Born about 1845 in Orange, Indiana. Died in 1927, about 82 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Union Chapel Cemetery.

Married Eliza A. _____. Eliza A. _____ b. in 1849 in Indiana; d. in 1928, 78 or 79 years old; bur. in Crawford.

Issue of Joel Key and Eliza A. _____:

      i. son 8William H. Key b. about 1868 in Crawford.
      ii. son Charles Key b. on 25 June 1869 in Crawford; d. on 14 Sep. 1898, 29 years old.
      iii. son Isaac S. Key b. about 1871 in Crawford.
      iv. dau. Lily Key b. about 1873 in Crawford.
      v. son Edward Key b. about 1876 in Crawford.
      vi. son Isom Key b. about 1876 in Crawford.

Notes on Joel Key:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3573@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Union Chapel Cemetery, North Of Milltown [85401]

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 11, Line 76
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [85408]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [85409]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [85410]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0270, Page Number 277C
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Joel KEY Self M Male W 35 IN Farmer IN IN Eliza A. KEY Wife M Female W 30 IN Keeping House IN IN William H. KEY Son S Male W 12 IN At Home IN IN Charles KEY Son S Male W 11 IN At Home IN IN Isaac S. KEY Son S Male W 9 IN At Home IN IN Lily KEY Dau S Female W 7 IN At Home IN IN Eddie KEY Son S Male W 4 IN At Home IN IN Isom KEY Son S Male W 4 IN At Home IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [85434]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [85435]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [85436]

Sources for Joel Key:

Source 1
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Eliza A. _____:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I38446@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Union Chapel Cemetery, North Of Milltown [627212]

130. 7Susannah Key, dau. of William Key and 6Sarah Stroud [49]. Born about 1847 in Orange, Indiana.

Married George Washington Sillings, son of Shadreck Sillings (son of David (Daniel) Sillings and May (Polly) Snider) and Martha Potter, on 30 Aug. 1865 in Crawford when about 18 years old (George Washington was 21 years old). George Washington Sillings b. on 14 April 1844 in Crawford; d. on 1 Feb. 1927, 82 years old; m. (2) Mary Elizabeth Goodson (1866 in English, Crawford, Indiana–), dau. of James Goodson (son of Thomas Goodson and Jane Sturgeon) and Sarah N. Toney (dau. of John Toney and Lucy Faris), on 30 April 1879 in Crawford when 35 years old (Mary Elizabeth was twelve or 13 years old); issue (surname Sillings): Minnie T. (1880 in Illinois–); m. (3) Belle _____ (1882 in Indiana–) in 1904 when 59 or 60 years old (Belle was 21 or 22 years old).

Issue of Susannah Key and George Washington Sillings:

232   i. dau. 8Daisy Fern Sillings b. in Indiana.
      ii. dau. Martha Sillings m. George Oliver Real (9 April 1867 in Crawford–1955 bur. in Crawford, Indiana, Mathers Cemetery), son of Michael Stewart Real (son of John Real and Martha Ann Stewart) and Lavina Ann Sisk.

Notes on George Washington Sillings:

Event: - Union Army, Company G, 66th Infantry Regiment Indiana
Type: Military Service
Date: 14 AUG 1862-03 JUN 1865
Place: War (1861-1865) (Civil)
Note:
See source 1 for this person
Extracted text: George W. Sillings, Musician - Drummer, enlisted in Co G, 66th IN Infantry Regiment, Vols on Aug 14, 1862 at Leavenworth, IN. The 66th was organized at Camp Noble, New Albany with General Lew Wallace commanding.On Aug 23rd it marched to Richmond, KY. On Aug 29th the 66th moved to Chattanooga, TN to take a stand against the Confederates at Daton, GA. Moving with Sherman’s Army, the 66th was in the campaign that captured Atlanta on the 26th of Sep. The 66th then entrained to Rome, Ga arriving on the 27th. On the 15th of November, the 66th left Atlanta with Sherman, reaching Savannah, GA on Dec 21st. From there it marched on through the Carolina’s, through Virginia, reaching Washington, DC on May 24, 1865, where it was mustered out of federal service on June 3, 1865.

Census
Date: 1880
Place: Elbridge, Edgar, Illinois
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0204, Page Number 47B
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: George SILLINGS Self M Male W 34 IN Laborer IN IN Mary E. SILLINGS Wife M Female W 24 IN Keeping House IN IN Minnie T. SILLINGS Dau S Female W 4M IL IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [127001]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [127002]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [127003]

Event
Type: Pension Roll
Date: 01 AUG 1894
Place: Indiana
Note: Appliedfor and was approved for pension for service during the Civil War.
See source 3 for this person
Page(s): George W. Sillings, Cert# 375142
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Media format: jpg
Media file: George W. Sillings.jpg
Media format: jpg
Media file: Abraham Mackey.jpg
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [127024]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [127025]

Census
Date: 1910
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township, District 34
See source 4 for this person
Page(s): Page 27, line 263
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Sillings, George W., head, age 65, m 6 yrs , Belle, wife, age 28, m 6 yrs, 1 born 1 living

Media link
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 2 _SCBK Y [127043]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 2 _PRIM Y [127044]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 2 _TYPE PHOTO [127045]

Notes for the family of George Washington Sillings and Susannah Key:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C page 203Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by Simon Monk, JP.

Notes for the family of George Washington Sillings and Mary Elizabeth Goodson:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book D page 365Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by Joseph Boyd, MG

Sources for George Washington Sillings:

Source 1
Title: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 66th Infantry Reg’t, Indiana
Extracted Text: Regimental History Sixty-sixth Infantry INDIANA (3-YEARS)

Sixty-sixth Infantry. -- Cols., Lewis Wallace, De Witt C. Anthony, Roger Martin; Lieut.-Cols., Roger Martin, Thomas G. Morrison; Majs. John W. Gerard, Thomas G. Morrison.

This regiment was organized at New Albany and was mustered in Aug. 19, 1862. It left the state the same day for Lexington, Ky., where Lieut.-Col. Martin assumed command, Gen. Wallace having been commissioned provisional colonel at the time of the muster-in and being assigned on reaching Lexington to the command of the troops then concentrating at Covington and Cincinnati.

The regiment was engaged in the battle of Richmond, Ky., the greater part of it being captured and paroled. The paroled men and the remainder of the regiment were ordered to New Albany. An exchange was made in November, when, under command of Col. Anthony the regiment moved to Corinth, where it was assigned to the 1st brigade of Dodge’s division, remaining as part of the garrison until Aug. 18, 1863.

It then moved to Collierville, Tenn., where Cos. B, C, D, E, G and I were engaged in October, and on Oct. 29 moved for Pulaski, where it passed the winter. On April 29, 1864, the regiment marched to Chattanooga, and from there formed a junction with Sherman’s army for the Atlanta campaign, being engaged at Resaca, Lay’s Ferry, Rome cross-roads, Dallas, Kennesaw Mountain, before Atlanta, and at Jonesboro.

On Sept. 26 it took the train with its division for Rome, GA, but later rejoined the army at Atlanta and moved with it for Savannah. It marched through the Carolinas and Virginia to Washington and was mustered out there on June 3, 1865. The recruits were transferred to the 59th and served with that regiment until its muster-out.

The original strength of the 66th was 1,017; gain by recruits, 101; total, 1,118. Loss by death, 234; desertion, 32; unaccounted for, 15.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 3

Battles Fought

Fought on 30 August 1862 at Richmond, KY. Fought on 11 October 1863 at Collierville, TN. Fought on 14 May 1864 at Resaca, GA. Fought on 27 May 1864 at Dallas, GA. Fought on 28 May 1864 at Dallas, GA. Fought on 22 July 1864 at Atlanta, GA. Fought on 09 August 1864 at Atlanta, GA. Fought on 11 August 1864 at Atlanta, GA. Fought on 29 August 1864 at Atlanta, GA. Fought on 31 August 1864.
ABBR: War (1861-1865) (Civil), History of the 66th Infantry Reg’t, Indiana
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 3
Title: Pension records
ABBR: Pension records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 4
Title: 1910 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, actual images of the 1910 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, T624, 1784 rolls may be browsed by selecting a state, county, township, and enumeration district.
Enumerators of the 1910 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; relationship to head of family; age at last birthday; sex; color or race; whether single, married, widowed, or divorced; number of years of present marriage; number of children born; number of children now living; birthplace; mother tongue; birthplace of father and mother; mother tongue of father and mother; year of immigration to the U.S.; whether naturalized or alien; whether able to speak English, or if not, give language spoken; trade or profession; industry; whether employer, employee, or working on own account; if an employee, whether out of work on April 15, 1910; if an employee, number of weeks out of work during year 1909, whether able to read; whether able to write; attended school any time since September 1, 1909; home owned or rented; home owned free or mortgaged; farm or house; number of farm schedule; whether a survivor of the Union or Confederate Army or Navy; whether blind; whether deaf and dumb. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1910 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of George Washington Sillings and Susannah Key:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of George Washington Sillings and Mary Elizabeth Goodson:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of Goldsberry Key and 6Mary Stroud [50] (5Isham (Isom) Stroud [18], 4John Stroud [10], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1])

131. 7Martin V. Key, son of Goldsberry Key and 6Mary Stroud [50]. Born in 1838 in Indiana. Died after 1910, at least 72 years old.

Married Armina Jane Kimbrel. Armina Jane Kimbrel b. in 1862 in Indiana; d. after 1910, at least 48 years old.

Issue of Martin V. Key and Armina Jane Kimbrel:

      i. dau. 8Ollie Key m. Jason Kintner.
      ii. dau. Eliza Myrtle Key bur. in Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs.
233   iii. dau. Elsie Caroline Key b. on 1 March 1888 in Crawford.
      iv. dau. Josephine ’Josie" Key b. about 1896 in Indiana; bur. in Crawford; m. _____ King.
      v. dau. Cledie Key b. about 1903 in Indiana; m. Arthur Stewart.

Notes on Martin V. Key:

Census
Date: 1910
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 3 line 33
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Key, Martin V., age 75, m 25 yrs , Jane, wife, age 48, m 25 yrs, 8 born 5 living , Josie, daughter, age 14 , Celeata, daughter, age 7

Need to verify this given name, and to check to see if he may be son by a previous marriage?

Sources for Martin V. Key:

Source 1
Title: 1910 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, actual images of the 1910 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, T624, 1784 rolls may be browsed by selecting a state, county, township, and enumeration district.
Enumerators of the 1910 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; relationship to head of family; age at last birthday; sex; color or race; whether single, married, widowed, or divorced; number of years of present marriage; number of children born; number of children now living; birthplace; mother tongue; birthplace of father and mother; mother tongue of father and mother; year of immigration to the U.S.; whether naturalized or alien; whether able to speak English, or if not, give language spoken; trade or profession; industry; whether employer, employee, or working on own account; if an employee, whether out of work on April 15, 1910; if an employee, number of weeks out of work during year 1909, whether able to read; whether able to write; attended school any time since September 1, 1909; home owned or rented; home owned free or mortgaged; farm or house; number of farm schedule; whether a survivor of the Union or Confederate Army or Navy; whether blind; whether deaf and dumb. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1910 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

132. 7Sarah Adeline Key, dau. of Goldsberry Key and 6Mary Stroud [50]. Born on 8 Feb. 1841. Died on 5 Dec. 1898, 57 years old. Buried in Orange, Indiana, Bluff Springs Cemetery.

Married first Sidney White, son of Drewey White and Elizabeth Bird, on 2 Jan. 1859 in Orange, Indiana when 17 years old. Sidney White d. on 8 Feb. 1875 in Orange; bur. in Orange.

Issue of Sarah Adeline Key and Sidney White:

      i. dau. 8_____ White .
      ii. son Charles White b. in 1860.
      iii. son Tolbert J. White b. in Nov. 1861.
      iv. son Jeremiah W. White b. in 1871 in Indiana.

Married second David Dillman, son of Michael Dillman (son of Johann Michael Dillmann and Maria Elisabeth Legrand) and Cynthia Batman (dau. of Henry Alexander Batman and Mary Polly Reed), on 10 July 1889 in Crawford when 48 years old (David was 53 years old). David Dillman b. on 28 Jan. 1836 in Harrison; d. on 21 May 1910 in Crawford, 74 years old; bur. in Crawford, Indiana, Dillman Cemetery; m. (1) Evaline J. Webb (26 Jan. 1836 in Gallatin, Kentucky–29 Dec. 1885 in Crawford), dau. of John Webb and Penelope Cale (dau. of Richard Cale and _____ Hannah), on 5 Nov. 1857 in Crawford when 21 years old (Evaline J. was 21 years old); issue (surname Dillman): Mary Elizabeth (Aug. 1858 in Crawford–), George M. (2 Feb. 1861 in Crawford–1941 bur. in Crawford), Henry Peter (20 Aug. bet. 1861 and 1863 in Leavenworth, Crawford, Indiana–15 March 1940 in Doolittle Mills, Perry, Indiana), Emoline Jane (Aug. 1865 in Crawford–1907/8 in Milltown, Crawford, Indiana), James (Nov. 1866 in Indiana–), Dennis Martin (abt. 1869 in Indiana–bef. 1895), Roseanna Lucrecia (March 1873 in Crawford–July 1953 in English, Crawford, Indiana) and David Samuel (17 June 1877 in Crawford–13 July 1923 in Alton, Madison, Illinois, USA); m. (3) Eliza Stephenson (5 Dec. 1846 in Indiana–22 Jan. 1924 in Orange), dau. of Thomas Stephenson and Sophia Northcutt, on 20 Nov. 1902 in Crawford when 66 years old (Eliza was 55 years old).

Notes on Sarah Adeline Key:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3581@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Orange, Indiana, Bluff Springs Cemetery, Southeast Township, Valeene, Section 15 T1s R1e [85620]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 1 _TAG [85621]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0302, Page Number 94C
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Sarah A. WHITE Self W Female W 39 IN House Keeping NC IN Jeremiah W. WHITE Son S Male W 9 IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [85633]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [85634]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [85635]

Old church records indicate that this Sarah was the Adeline White that married David Dillman.

Sources for Sarah Adeline Key:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Sidney White:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I29676@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Orange, Indiana, Bluff Springs Cemetery, Southeast Township, Valeene, Section 15 T1s R1e [495602]

Notes for the family of Sidney White and Sarah Adeline Key:

Census: 1860Date: 1860Place: , Orange, Indiana, Southeast TownshipNote: 0350-0350 White, Sidney 24 M W Blacksmith $100 IN White, Sarah A. 20 F W IN White, Charles M. 6 m M W IN

Notes on David Dillman:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I108@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Dillman Cemetery, Curby [7534]

Burial
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): David Dillman
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 05 JUL 1893 [7538]
Note: Tombstone reads: “Blessed are pure in heart for they shall see God”
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 1 _TAG [7541]

Event
Type: Property
Date: 01 DEC 1849
Place: , Crawford, Indiana
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): 21837
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 05 JUL 1893 [7549]
Note: Warrantee Name: DAVID DILLMAN Document #: 21837 Issue Date: December 1, 1849 Cancelled: No Authority: April 24, 1820: SALE-CASH ENTRY (3 Stat. 566) Acres: 38.7 Land Office: JEFFERSONVILLE # Aliquot Parts - 1; Sec/ Blk - NWNW; Twnshp - 3/; Range - 3-S; Fract. Sect. - 1-E; Meridian - No 2nd PM; State - IN; Counties - CRAWFORD

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township
See source 3 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0271 Page Number 390D, Line 312
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: David DILLMAN Self M Male W 46 IN Farmer OH IN Eveline DILLMAN Wife M Female W 46 KY Keeping House KY KY Peter DILLMAN Son S Male W 17 IN IN KY Emeline DILLMAN Dau S Female W 14 IN IN KY James DILLMAN Son S Male W 13 IN IN KY Dennis DILLMAN Son S Male W 11 IN IN KY Annie DILLMAN Dau S Female W 7 IN IN KY Samuel DILLMAN Son S Male W 3 IN IN KY George DILLMAN Son M Male W 20 IN Works On Farm IN KY Annie Bell DILLMAN DauL M Female W 16 --- --- ---
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [7588]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [7589]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [7590]

Event
Type: Honors
Date: 1883 1884
Place: Grantsburg, Crawford, Indiana
Note: as District Deputy Grand Master, I.O.O.F, Member Grantsburg, Indiana, Lodge # 407.

Census
Date: 1900
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township
See source 4 for this person
Extracted text: Dillman, David, age 64, born Jan 1836 in Indiana, widower
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [7604]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [7605]

Probate
Date: 28 JUN 1910
Place: , Crawford, Indiana
See source 5 for this person
Page(s): Order Book 14 Page 487
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 05 JUL 1893 [7612]
Note: David’s Probate Order listed all real and personal property valued at less than $500.00 be awarded to widow Eliza Dillman.

Media link
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 2 _SCBK Y [7623]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 2 _PRIM Y [7624]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 2 _TYPE PHOTO [7625]

Notes for the family of David Dillman and Evaline J. Webb:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book B Page 309Assessment: 4Note: Married by William J. Miller, JPMarriageNote: Married by William J. Miller, JP

Notes for the family of David Dillman and Sarah Adeline Key:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book F page 56Assessment: 4Note: Married by John McDonald, JP.

Notes for the family of David Dillman and Eliza Stephenson:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book G Page 457Assessment: 4Note: Married by Samuel White, MG.See source 2 for this familyExtracted text: David and Eliza Stephenson DillmanMedia format: jpgMedia file: SDAV22e.jpgMarriageNote: Marriage license issued to David Dillman and Eliza Vernon!

Sources for David Dillman:

Source 1
Title: Grave Headstone Information
ABBR: Grave Headstone Information
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: Land Patent (US)
ABBR: Land Patent (US)
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 3
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 4
Title: 1900 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database is an index to all individuals enumerated in the 1900 United States Federal Census, the Twelfth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1900 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, T623, 1854 rolls. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1900 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; address; relationship to the head of household; color or race; sex; month and year of birth; age at last birthday; marital status; number of years married; the total number of children born of the mother; the number of those children living; places of birth of each individual and the parents of each individual; if the individual was foreign born, the year of immigration and the number of years in the United States; the citizenship status of foreign-born individuals over age twenty-one; occupation; whether the person could read, write, and speak English; whether the home was owned or rented; whether the home was on a farm; and whether the home was mortgaged. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1900 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 5
Title: Indiana, County of Crawford, Will & Probate Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Will & Probate Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of David Dillman and Evaline J. Webb:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of David Dillman and Sarah Adeline Key:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of David Dillman and Eliza Stephenson:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: Family Photos
Extracted Text:
Clarence A. and Agnes I. Dillman Collection
MEDI: Personal
ABBR: Family Photos
_QUOTED: Y
_PAREN: Y

133. 7Aniel Key, son of Goldsberry Key and 6Mary Stroud [50]. Born in 1864 in Indiana.

Married Cora _____ about 1888 when about 24 years old (Cora was about 23 years old). Cora _____ b. about 1865 in Indiana.

Issue of Aniel Key and Cora _____:

      i. son 8Hubert Key b. about 1890 in Indiana.
      ii. son Eldon Key b. about 1892 in Indiana.
      iii. son Adon Key b. about 1895 in Indiana.
      iv. dau. Beatrice Key b. about 1898 in Indiana.
      v. son _____ Key b. about 1903 in Indiana.
      vi. dau. Carrie Key b. about 1909 in Indiana.

Notes on Aniel Key:

Census
Date: 1910
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Jennings Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 18 line 221
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Key, Aniel, age 46, M 22 yrs , Emily, age 45, M 22 yrs, 6 born 6 living , Hubert, son, age 20 , Eldon, son, age 18 , Adon, son, age 15 , Beatrice, daughter, age 12 , ?, son, age 7 , Carry, daughter, age 1 3/12

Sources for Aniel Key:

Source 1
Title: 1910 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, actual images of the 1910 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, T624, 1784 rolls may be browsed by selecting a state, county, township, and enumeration district.
Enumerators of the 1910 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; relationship to head of family; age at last birthday; sex; color or race; whether single, married, widowed, or divorced; number of years of present marriage; number of children born; number of children now living; birthplace; mother tongue; birthplace of father and mother; mother tongue of father and mother; year of immigration to the U.S.; whether naturalized or alien; whether able to speak English, or if not, give language spoken; trade or profession; industry; whether employer, employee, or working on own account; if an employee, whether out of work on April 15, 1910; if an employee, number of weeks out of work during year 1909, whether able to read; whether able to write; attended school any time since September 1, 1909; home owned or rented; home owned free or mortgaged; farm or house; number of farm schedule; whether a survivor of the Union or Confederate Army or Navy; whether blind; whether deaf and dumb. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1910 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of Lewis Suddarth and 6Lydia M. Stroud [52] (5Isham (Isom) Stroud [18], 4John Stroud [10], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1])

134. 7Sarah Victoria Suddarth, dau. of Lewis Suddarth and 6Lydia M. Stroud [52]. Born on 31 Jan. 1842 in Crawford, Indiana. Died on 31 Dec. 1923 in Crawford, 81 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Highfill Chapel Cemetery.

Married John Wesley Belcher, son of Berry Belcher and Mary A. Trusty, on 16 June 1861 in Crawford when 19 years old (John Wesley was about 24 years old). John Wesley Belcher b. about 1837 in Orange; d. on 10 April 1910 in Crawford, about 73 years old; bur. in Crawford.

Issue of Sarah Victoria Suddarth and John Wesley Belcher:

234   i. dau. 8Lydia Victoria Belcher b. on 16 April 1862 in Crawford, Indiana, Patoka Township.
      ii. dau. Mary Francis Belcher b. on 27 June 1864 in Crawford; d. on 27 June 1864 in Crawford, newborn.
235   iii. son George Washington Wesley Belcher b. in Dec. 1865 in Crawford.
236   iv. dau. Nancy Isabella Belcher b. on 16 Oct. 1868 in Crawford.
237   v. dau. Martha Ann Belcher b. on 23 Aug. 1870 in Crawford.
      vi. dau. Amanda Jane Belcher b. on 3 Nov. 1872 in Crawford; d. in July 1899, 26 years old; m. John J. Burrows on 2 Jan. 1892 in Crawford when 19 years old.
238   vii. son John Henry Belcher b. on 6 April 1873 in Taswell, Crawford, Indiana.
239   viii. son William Lewis Belcher b. on 29 Oct. 1877 in Crawford.
      ix. dau. Lucinda Belcher b. on 13 Jan. 1880; d. in May 1954, 74 years old; m. John J Burrows on 11 March 1900 in Crawford when 20 years old.
      x. son James Nelson Belcher b. on 25 May 1883 in Gibson; d. on 11 June 1938, 55 years old; m. Amanda Zimmerman (18 Nov. 1884 in Crawford–17 Feb. 1950), dau. of Benjamin Zimmerman and Ida Allstott (dau. of Anthony Allstott and Zerilda Allen), on 1 April 1904 when 20 years old (Amanda was 19 years old).
      xi. dau. Sarah Elizabeth Belcher b. on 7 Jan. 1885; d. in July 1885, about six months old.

Notes on Sarah Victoria Suddarth:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3588@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Highfill Chapel Cemetery, Taswell [85799]

Notes on John Wesley Belcher:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I8504@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Highfill Chapel Cemetery, Taswell [161720]

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Patoka Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 27 Line 194
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [161727]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [161728]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [161729]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Patoka Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0271, Page Number 356D
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: J. W. BELCHER Self M Male W 42 IN Farming KY IN Sarah V. BELCHER Wife M Female W 38 IN Keeping House IN IN Lydia BELCHER Dau S Female W 18 IN Housekeeper IN IN George W. BELCHER Son Male W 15 IN Farmer IN IN Nancy I. BELCHER Dau S Female W 12 IN Housekeeper IN IN Martha A. BELCHER Dau S Female W 10 IN IN IN Manda J. BELCHER Dau S Female W 8 IN IN IN John H. BELCHER Son S Male W 5 IN IN IN Wm. L. BELCHER Son S Male W 2 IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [161754]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [161755]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [161756]

Notes for the family of John Wesley Belcher and Sarah Victoria Suddarth:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C page 26Assessment: 4Note: Married by William Highfill, MG.

Sources for John Wesley Belcher:

Source 1
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of John Wesley Belcher and Sarah Victoria Suddarth:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

135. 7Jeremiah Suddarth, son of Lewis Suddarth and 6Lydia M. Stroud [52]. Born on 29 May 1848 in Crawford, Indiana. Died on 27 April 1932, 83 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Highfill Chapel Cemetery.

Married Rebecca Ann Belcher, dau. of John Belcher and Abigail Sinclair, on 9 Feb. 1872 in Crawford when 23 years old (Rebecca Ann was 15 years old). Rebecca Ann Belcher b. on 6 Feb. 1857 in Crawford; d. on 23 Dec. 1927 in Crawford, 70 years old; bur. in Crawford.

Issue of Jeremiah Suddarth and Rebecca Ann Belcher:

      i. dau. 8Nancy Jane Suddarth b. on 16 Jan. 1874 in Crawford.
      ii. son William E Suddarth b. on 1 Sep. 1876 in Crawford; m. (1) _____ _____ (–18 March 1930); m. (2) Dora Wellman (20 Nov. 1871 in Orange–), dau. of Richard N. Wellman and Mary Jane Parke, on 3 Dec. 1936 in Crawford when 60 years old (Dora was 65 years old).
      iii. dau. Sarah E Suddarth b. on 28 Nov. 1879 in Crawford.
240   iv. son Joseph Newton Suddarth b. on 11 May 1885 in Crawford.
241   v. dau. Emma A. Suddarth b. on 19 Jan. 1888 in Crawford.
      vi. dau. Cohina A Suddarth b. in 1888.
      vii. dau. Mary L Suddarth b. on 5 Aug. 1890 in Crawford; m. Arthur Vandiver (8 Feb. 1883 in Crawford–) on 7 Feb. 1909 in Crawford when 18 years old (Arthur was 25 years old).
      viii. son Charles M Suddarth b. in 1893; m. Hazel M. _____ (abt. 1900 in Indiana–).
242   ix. dau. Claire B. Suddarth b. on 1 Aug. 1894 in Crawford.
      x. son Volly M Suddarth b. in 1896.
243   xi. dau. Lola M Suddarth b. on 13 Sep. 1899 in Crawford.

Notes on Jeremiah Suddarth:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I8582@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Highfill Chapel Cemetery, Taswell [162812]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Patoka Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0271, Page Number 357B
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Jeremiah SUDDARTH Self M Male W 31 IN Farming SCOT IN Becca A. SUDDARTH Wife M Female W 23 IN Keeping House IN IN Nancy J. SUDDARTH Dau S Female W 5 IN IN IN Wm. F. SUDDARTH Son S Male W 3 IN IN IN Sara E. SUDDARTH Dau S Female W 6M IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [162830]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [162831]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [162832]

Census
Date: 01 JAN 1920
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Patoka Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): Roll: T625_426, Page: 1B, Line 16
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Suddarth, Jeremiah, head, age 70 , Rebecca, wife, age 62 , Volley, son, age 22
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [162844]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [162845]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [162846]

Sources for Jeremiah Suddarth:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1920 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1920 Census was begun on 1 January 1920. The following questions were asked by enumerators: Name of street, avenue road, etc.; house number or farm; number of dwelling in order of visitation; number of family in order of visitation; name of each person whose place of abode was with the family; relationship of person enumerated to the head of the family; whether home owned or rented; if owned, whether free or mortgaged; sex; color or race; age at last birthday; whether single, married, widowed, or divorced; year of immigration to United States; whether naturalized or alien; if naturalized, year of naturalization; whether attended school any time since 1 September 1919; whether able to read; whether able to write; person’s place of birth; mother tongue; father’s place of birth; father’s mother tongue; mother’s place of birth; mother’s mother tongue; whether able to speak English; trade, profession, or particular kind of work done; industry, business, or establishment in which at work; whether employer, salary or wage worker, or working on own account; number of farm schedule.
The date of the enumeration appears on the heading of each page of the census schedule. All responses were to reflect the individual’s status as of 1 January 1920, even if the status had changed between 1 January and the day of enumeration. Children born between 1 January and the day of enumeration were not to be listed, while individuals alive on 1 January but deceased when the enumerator arrived were to be counted.
Unlike the 1910 census, the 1920 census did not have questions regarding unemployment, Union or Confederate military service, number of children, or duration of marriage. It did, however, include four new question columns: one asked the year of naturalization and three inquired about mother tongue. The 1920 census also asked the year of arrival and status of every foreign-born person and inquired about the year of naturalization for those individuals who had become U.S. citizens. In 1920 the census included, for the first time, Guam, American Samoa, and the Panama Canal Zone.
Due to boundary modifications in Europe resulting from World War I, some individuals were uncertain about how to identify their national origin. Enumerators were instructed to spell out the name of the city, state, province, or region of respondents who declared that they or their parents had been born in Germany, Austria-Hungary, Russia, or Turkey. Interpretation of the birthplace varied from one enumerator to another. Some failed to identify specific birthplaces within those named countries, and others provided an exact birthplace in countries not designated in the instructions.
There are no separate Indian population schedules in the 1920 census. Inhabitants of reservations were enumerated in the general population schedules. Enumerators were instructed not to report servicemen in the family enumerations but to treat them as residents of their duty posts. The 1920 census includes schedules for overseas military and naval forces.
The original 1920 census schedules were destroyed by authorization of the Eighty-third Congress, so it is not possible to consult originals when microfilm copies prove unreadable.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1920 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Rebecca Ann Belcher:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I8583@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Highfill Chapel Cemetery, Taswell [162865]

136. 7John Wesley Suddarth, son of Lewis Suddarth and 6Lydia M. Stroud [52]. Born about 1852 in Crawford, Indiana. Died on 4 July 1942, about 90 years old.

Married Margaret Ann Enlow about 1875 when about 23 years old (Margaret Ann was about 25 years old). Margaret Ann Enlow b. about 1850 in Indiana.

Issue of John Wesley Suddarth and Margaret Ann Enlow:

      i. dau. 8Frank Suddarth .
      ii. dau. Daisy Suddarth b. on 4 Nov. 1888 in Crawford; m. Grover Everett Cox (15 Nov. 1885 in Orange–), son of Lewis Mcclellen Cox and Nancy Elizabeth North, on 6 July 1908 in Crawford when 19 years old (Grover Everett was 22 years old).
      iii. son Simon O. Suddarth b. on 31 March 1886 in Crawford; m. Minnie M. Cummins (10 May 1893 in Crawford–), dau. of Jackson Cummins and Mary Grimes, on 23 Dec. 1914 in Crawford when 28 years old (Minnie M. was 21 years old).

Notes on John Wesley Suddarth:

In the 1930 census they had living with them the following children:

Suddarth, Zelma J., Grandau., age 14
Mary M. Grandau., age 12
Farrell E., Grandson, age 10
Thelma B. Grandau., age 3.5
All born in Indiana.

137. 7Joseph Boyde Suddarth, son of Lewis Suddarth and 6Lydia M. Stroud [52]. Born on 27 May 1860 in Crawford, Indiana.

Married Sarah Elizabeth McGUIRE.

Issue of Joseph Boyde Suddarth and Sarah Elizabeth McGUIRE:

      i. son 8Jame Lewis Suddarth b. on 16 Aug. 1884 in Crawford.
      ii. son Marion Franklin Suddarth b. on 22 April 1893 in Pike, Indiana, Patoka Township.
      iii. son Oliver Suddarth b. on 8 Aug. 1898 in Pike.

Notes on Joseph Boyde Suddarth:

1 BIRT 2 DATE ABT 1858 2 PLAC IN 1 BIRT 2 DATE ABT 1861

138. 7Andrew S. Suddarth, son of Lewis Suddarth and 6Lydia M. Stroud [52]. Born on 3 Aug. 1868 in Crawford, Indiana. Died on 3 Aug. 1914, 46 years old.

Married Martha Ann Hollen on 30 Jan. 1888 when 19 years old.

Issue of Andrew S. Suddarth and Martha Ann Hollen:

      i. dau. 8Lydia Suddarth b. on 24 Oct. 1887 in Crawford; m. William Key (14 Feb. 1884 in Crawford–), son of David Key and Emma Padgett, on 23 April 1906 in Crawford when 18 years old (William was 22 years old).
244   ii. dau. Pashia I. Suddarth b. on 16 Aug. 1892 in Crawford.


Issue of 6Isom Stroud [57] (5Isham (Isom) Stroud [18], 4John Stroud [10], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Christina Jones

139. 7William Henry Stroud, son of 6Isom Stroud [57] and Christina Jones. Born on 19 Oct. 1864 in Orange, Indiana. Died on 21 Sep. 1942 in Indiana, 77 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Union Chapel Cemetery.

Married first Minnie Belle Rawlings, dau. of Edward A. Rawlings (son of John Rawlings and Malinda _____) and Lucinda Jane Poe (dau. of Jacob Poe and Mary Indiana Boston), on 6 July 1889 in Crawford when 24 years old (Minnie Belle was 22 years old). Minnie Belle Rawlings b. on 11 Feb. 1867 in Crawford; d. on 11 Nov. 1894, 27 years old; bur. in Crawford.

Issue of William Henry Stroud and Minnie Belle Rawlings:

245   i. son 8Lewis F. Stroud b. on 4 Oct. 1890 in Harrison.
246   ii. son Charles Stroud b. on 19 Dec. 1892 in Crawford.

Married second Emma Whitman Jones on 28 Feb. 1895 in Crawford when 30 years old. Emma Whitman Jones b. in Harrison.

Issue of William Henry Stroud and Emma Whitman Jones:

247   iii. dau. 8Ada Stroud .
      iv. dau. Mabelle Stroud b. on 25 Nov. 1901 in Crawford; m. James McINTOSH (5 Oct. 1896 in Crawford–March 1966 in Remote, Coos, Oregon), son of Wesley McINTOSH and Dora Totten, on 12 Sep. 1921 in Crawford when 19 years old (James was 24 years old).
248   v. son William Edward Stroud b. in 1900.
      vi. dau. Minnie Belle Stroud m. Henry McKinley.

Notes on William Henry Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3601@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Union Chapel Cemetery, North Of Milltown [86001]

Census
Date: 1900
Place: , Orange, Indiana
Note: census, 57-47/6-48

Notes for the family of William Henry Stroud and Minnie Belle Rawlings:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book F page 56Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by John W. Tower, JP

Notes for the family of William Henry Stroud and Emma Whitman Jones:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book F page420Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by Isaac Goodman

Sources for the family of William Henry Stroud and Minnie Belle Rawlings:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of William Henry Stroud and Emma Whitman Jones:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Minnie Belle Rawlings:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I11370@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Union Chapel Cemetery, North Of Milltown [202013]

140. 7Martha Maybelle Stroud, dau. of 6Isom Stroud [57] and Christina Jones. Born on 1 Dec. 1867 in Orange, Indiana. Died on 4 Nov. 1917 in Illinois, 49 years old.

Married Sherman Lockhart, son of James Alexander Lockhart and Emily J. Burton, on 27 Dec. 1886 in Crawford when 19 years old (Sherman was 20 years old). Sherman Lockhart b. on 16 March 1866 in Harrison; d. in 1932 in Bridgeport, Lawrence, Illinois, USA, 65 or 66 years old.

Issue of Martha Maybelle Stroud and Sherman Lockhart:

      i. dau. 8Minnie F. Lockhart b. in 1895 in Orange.
      ii. dau. Gladys Lockhart b. in 1897 in Orange.
      iii. dau. Blanche Lockhart b. on 14 Oct. 1898 in Orange.
249   iv. son John Cadmus Lockhart b. on 25 March 1889 in Orange.
      v. dau. Ola Mae Lockhart b. on 20 May 1893 in Orange.
      vi. son William Beecher Lockhart b. on 11 July 1886 in Orange; d. on 5 April 1963 in Lawrence, 76 years old; m. Cora Belle Seitzinger (1885–) on 12 Feb. 1906 when 19 years old (Cora Belle was 20 or 21 years old).

Notes on Sherman Lockhart:

Notes for the family of Sherman Lockhart and Martha Maybelle Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book E page 386Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by William Tyler, MG.

Sources for the family of Sherman Lockhart and Martha Maybelle Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

141. 7Ada F. Stroud, dau. of 6Isom Stroud [57] and Christina Jones. Born on 26 Aug. 1876 in Orange, Indiana. Died on 17 Dec. 1961 in Marengo, Crawford, Indiana, USA, 85 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Union Chapel Cemetery.

Married William H. Seacat, son of John Seacat (son of George Seacat and Mahala Davis) and Amanda Emiline Totten, on 24 April 1898 in Crawford when 21 years old (William H. was 21 years old). William H. Seacat b. on 22 Dec. 1876 in Harrison; d. on 15 March 1959 in Marengo, 82 years old; bur. in Crawford.

Issue of Ada F. Stroud and William H. Seacat:

      i. dau. 8Lois Seacat b. in 1902.
250   ii. dau. Gladys Seacat b. on 20 April 1904 in Crawford.

Notes on Ada F. Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3606@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Union Chapel Cemetery, North Of Milltown [86094]

Notes on William H. Seacat:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3607@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Union Chapel Cemetery, North Of Milltown [86113]

Census
Date: 1920
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Whisky Run Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Roll: T625_426, Page: 11A, Line 230
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [86120]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [86121]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [86122]

Notes for the family of William H. Seacat and Ada F. Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book G page 118Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by Enoch P. Stevens, MG.

Sources for William H. Seacat:

Source 1
Title: 1920 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1920 Census was begun on 1 January 1920. The following questions were asked by enumerators: Name of street, avenue road, etc.; house number or farm; number of dwelling in order of visitation; number of family in order of visitation; name of each person whose place of abode was with the family; relationship of person enumerated to the head of the family; whether home owned or rented; if owned, whether free or mortgaged; sex; color or race; age at last birthday; whether single, married, widowed, or divorced; year of immigration to United States; whether naturalized or alien; if naturalized, year of naturalization; whether attended school any time since 1 September 1919; whether able to read; whether able to write; person’s place of birth; mother tongue; father’s place of birth; father’s mother tongue; mother’s place of birth; mother’s mother tongue; whether able to speak English; trade, profession, or particular kind of work done; industry, business, or establishment in which at work; whether employer, salary or wage worker, or working on own account; number of farm schedule.
The date of the enumeration appears on the heading of each page of the census schedule. All responses were to reflect the individual’s status as of 1 January 1920, even if the status had changed between 1 January and the day of enumeration. Children born between 1 January and the day of enumeration were not to be listed, while individuals alive on 1 January but deceased when the enumerator arrived were to be counted.
Unlike the 1910 census, the 1920 census did not have questions regarding unemployment, Union or Confederate military service, number of children, or duration of marriage. It did, however, include four new question columns: one asked the year of naturalization and three inquired about mother tongue. The 1920 census also asked the year of arrival and status of every foreign-born person and inquired about the year of naturalization for those individuals who had become U.S. citizens. In 1920 the census included, for the first time, Guam, American Samoa, and the Panama Canal Zone.
Due to boundary modifications in Europe resulting from World War I, some individuals were uncertain about how to identify their national origin. Enumerators were instructed to spell out the name of the city, state, province, or region of respondents who declared that they or their parents had been born in Germany, Austria-Hungary, Russia, or Turkey. Interpretation of the birthplace varied from one enumerator to another. Some failed to identify specific birthplaces within those named countries, and others provided an exact birthplace in countries not designated in the instructions.
There are no separate Indian population schedules in the 1920 census. Inhabitants of reservations were enumerated in the general population schedules. Enumerators were instructed not to report servicemen in the family enumerations but to treat them as residents of their duty posts. The 1920 census includes schedules for overseas military and naval forces.
The original 1920 census schedules were destroyed by authorization of the Eighty-third Congress, so it is not possible to consult originals when microfilm copies prove unreadable.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1920 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of William H. Seacat and Ada F. Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of Isaac Jones and 6Nancy Catherine Stroud [61] (5Abraham Stroud [20], 4John Stroud [10], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1])

142. 7Emma F. Jones, dau. of Isaac Jones and 6Nancy Catherine Stroud [61]. Born on 13 Oct. 1870 in Crawford, Indiana.

Married Cadmus C. Funk, son of Abraham Clark Funk (son of Rheuben Funk and Lucinda Spencer) and Lavina Briscoe, on 12 Feb. 1899 in Crawford when 28 years old (Cadmus C. was 28 years old). Cadmus C. Funk b. on 15 Oct. 1870 in Milltown, Crawford, Indiana; d. on 15 May 1941, 70 years old; m. (1) 7Mary Catherine Stroud (14 Oct. 1869 in Orange–), dau. of 6Isom Stroud [57] and Christina Jones (dau. of Henry Jones and Margaret Crecelius), on 26 April 1890 in Crawford when 19 years old (Mary Catherine was 20 years old).

Issue of Emma F. Jones and Cadmus C. Funk:

      i. son 8Rossen B. Funk b. on 9 Nov. 1899 in Crawford; m. Fern D. Luckett (11 June 1899 in English, Crawford, Indiana–), dau. of MD Charles D. Luckett and Lone Eckerty, on 19 Sep. 1923 in Crawford when 23 years old (Fern D. was 24 years old).

Notes on Cadmus C. Funk:

Notes for the family of Cadmus C. Funk and Mary Catherine Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book F page 107Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by John Winkleflock, MG

Notes for the family of Cadmus C. Funk and Emma F. Jones:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book G page 167Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by John R. Stroud, MG

Sources for the family of Cadmus C. Funk and Mary Catherine Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Cadmus C. Funk and Emma F. Jones:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

143. 7Henry Wilbert Jones, son of Isaac Jones and 6Nancy Catherine Stroud [61]. Born on 2 Dec. 1882 in Crawford, Indiana.

Married first Lettie _____. Lettie _____ b. in 1888 in Indiana.

Issue of Henry Wilbert Jones and Lettie _____:

      i. dau. 8Vivian Jones b. in 1914 in Indiana.
      ii. son Wilbert B. Jones b. in 1916 in Indiana.
      iii. dau. Garnet R. Jones b. in 1918 in Indiana.
      iv. son Carl R. Jones b. in 1921 in Indiana.
      v. dau. Edith E. Jones b. in 1926 in Indiana.

Married second Frona Lawalin on 5 May 1943 in Crawford when 60 years old (Frona was 46 years old). Frona Lawalin b. on 14 Jan. 1897 in Perry.

Notes on Henry Wilbert Jones:

Notes for the family of Henry Wilbert Jones and Frona Lawalin:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book O page 537Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by Leonard Cummins, MG.

Sources for the family of Henry Wilbert Jones and Frona Lawalin:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

144. 7James Ott Jones, son of Isaac Jones and 6Nancy Catherine Stroud [61]. Born on 17 Jan. 1884 in Crawford, Indiana. Died on 12 Jan. 1947, 62 years old.

Married Rebecca Lucinda ’Lula’ Crecelius, dau. of Jacob Manuel ’Cooper’ Crecelius (son of Jacob Crecelius and Lucinda Spence) and Nancy E. Pirtle, on 19 Aug. 1916 in Crawford when 32 years old (Rebecca Lucinda ’Lula’ was 23 years old). Rebecca Lucinda ’Lula’ Crecelius b. on 30 May 1893 in Crawford; bur. in Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs.

Issue of James Ott Jones and Rebecca Lucinda ’Lula’ Crecelius:

      i. son 8Hazel O. Jones b. on 6 July 1917 in Crawford; d. before 2001, at most 83 years old; m. Rose Mary Sloan (10 Feb. 1927 in Crawford–), dau. of Rigley Sloan and Nora E. Austin, on 19 June 1943 in Crawford when 25 years old (Rose Mary was 16 years old).
251   ii. dau. Lola Opal Jones b. on 6 Jan. 1921 in Crawford.
252   iii. dau. Jackie Ruth Jones b. on 3 Sep. 1932 in Crawford.

Notes on James Ott Jones:

Notes for the family of James Ott Jones and Rebecca Lucinda ’Lula’ Crecelius:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book K page 243Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by A. J. Oster.

Sources for the family of James Ott Jones and Rebecca Lucinda ’Lula’ Crecelius:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Rebecca Lucinda ’Lula’ Crecelius:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I38345@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs, Old Town) Cemetery, Marengo [625780]


Issue of 7Abraham Key [151] and 6Nancy Rebecca Stroud [63] (5Wesley Stroud [21], 4John Stroud [10], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1])

145. 7Claude E. Key, son of 7Abraham Key [151] and 6Nancy Rebecca Stroud [63]. Born in Jan. 1878 in Crawford, Indiana.

Married Melinda C. _____ in 1904 when 25 or 26 years old (Melinda C. was 22 or 23 years old). Melinda C. _____ b. in 1881 in Indiana.

Issue of Claude E. Key and Melinda C. _____:

      i. dau. 8L. Key b. about 1905 in Indiana.
      ii. dau. Rella Key b. in 1907 in Indiana.
      iii. son Ralph L. Key b. in 1920 in Indiana.


Issue of John Moore and 6Mahala M. Stroud [64] (5Wesley Stroud [21], 4John Stroud [10], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1])

146. 7Albert Moore, son of John Moore and 6Mahala M. Stroud [64]. Born on 10 Dec. 1883. Died on 28 Sep. 1957, 73 years old. Buried in Cana Uniontown Cemetery.

Married Nellie Lee, dau. of Robert E. Lee (son of William J. Lee and Sarah Key) and Sarah Elizabeth Brown (dau. of James Zachary Brown and Rebecca A. Mathers), on 11 July 1910 in Crawford, Indiana when 26 years old (Nellie was 18 years old). Nellie Lee b. on 17 Jan. 1892; d. on 12 Jan. 1933, 40 years old; bur. in Cana Uniontown Cemetery.

Issue of Albert Moore and Nellie Lee:

253   i. son 8John Emery Moore b. on 13 June 1911.
254   ii. son Elmer Edward Moore b. on 20 April 1914 in North Vernon, Jennings, Indiana.
255   iii. dau. Alice Elizabeth Moore b. on 28 Sep. 1918 in Lexington, Scott, Indiana.
256   iv. son Albert Leroy Moore b. on 29 July 1921 in Lovett, Jennings, Indiana.
257   v. son Jerald Andrew Moore b. on 11 Jan. 1924.
258   vi. son Charles Robert Moore b. on 17 Dec. 1927.

Notes on Albert Moore:

Notes for the family of Albert Moore and Nellie Lee:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book J page 83Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by Bennett Miller, JP.

Sources for the family of Albert Moore and Nellie Lee:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of 6Henry C. Stroud [65] (5Isaiah Stroud [22], 4John Stroud [10], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Rachel Eastridge

147. 7Joseph F. Stroud, son of 6Henry C. Stroud [65] and Rachel Eastridge. Born on 4 Nov. 1874 in Perry, Indiana. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Pleasant Ridge Cemetery.

Married first Naomi P. Nash on 24 July 1898 in Crawford when 23 years old. Naomi P. Nash d. on 8 Aug. 1917.

Issue of Joseph F. Stroud and Naomi P. Nash:

      i. son 8Ray Stroud b. about 1900.
      ii. son Roy Stroud b. about 1902.
      iii. dau. Agatha Stroud b. on 6 Nov. 1904 in Crawford; m. Arnold Felker (4 Sep. 1902 in Crawford–), son of Edward Felker and Nora Baker, on 15 May 1922 in Crawford when 17 years old (Arnold was 19 years old).
      iv. dau. Astha Stroud b. about 1907.

Married second Rebecca Satterfield, dau. of William H. Satterfield and Mary A. Franks, on 28 Oct. 1918 in Crawford when 43 years old (Rebecca was 34 years old). Rebecca Satterfield b. on 5 Nov. 1883 in Crawford.

Notes on Joseph F. Stroud:

Census
Date: 1920
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Union Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Roll: T625_426, Page: 11B, Line 236
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Stroud, Joe F., head, age 45 , Rebecca, wife, age 37 , Roy, son, age unreadable , Ray, son, age 18 , Agatha, daughter, age 13 Roll, ??, ??, age 15 Stroud, Henry, father, age 75 , Rachel, step mother, age 73
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [86349]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [86350]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [86351]

Notes for the family of Joseph F. Stroud and Naomi P. Nash:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book G Page 130Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Notes for the family of Joseph F. Stroud and Rebecca Satterfield:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book K page 451Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by Otis Watson, MG.

Sources for Joseph F. Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1920 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1920 Census was begun on 1 January 1920. The following questions were asked by enumerators: Name of street, avenue road, etc.; house number or farm; number of dwelling in order of visitation; number of family in order of visitation; name of each person whose place of abode was with the family; relationship of person enumerated to the head of the family; whether home owned or rented; if owned, whether free or mortgaged; sex; color or race; age at last birthday; whether single, married, widowed, or divorced; year of immigration to United States; whether naturalized or alien; if naturalized, year of naturalization; whether attended school any time since 1 September 1919; whether able to read; whether able to write; person’s place of birth; mother tongue; father’s place of birth; father’s mother tongue; mother’s place of birth; mother’s mother tongue; whether able to speak English; trade, profession, or particular kind of work done; industry, business, or establishment in which at work; whether employer, salary or wage worker, or working on own account; number of farm schedule.
The date of the enumeration appears on the heading of each page of the census schedule. All responses were to reflect the individual’s status as of 1 January 1920, even if the status had changed between 1 January and the day of enumeration. Children born between 1 January and the day of enumeration were not to be listed, while individuals alive on 1 January but deceased when the enumerator arrived were to be counted.
Unlike the 1910 census, the 1920 census did not have questions regarding unemployment, Union or Confederate military service, number of children, or duration of marriage. It did, however, include four new question columns: one asked the year of naturalization and three inquired about mother tongue. The 1920 census also asked the year of arrival and status of every foreign-born person and inquired about the year of naturalization for those individuals who had become U.S. citizens. In 1920 the census included, for the first time, Guam, American Samoa, and the Panama Canal Zone.
Due to boundary modifications in Europe resulting from World War I, some individuals were uncertain about how to identify their national origin. Enumerators were instructed to spell out the name of the city, state, province, or region of respondents who declared that they or their parents had been born in Germany, Austria-Hungary, Russia, or Turkey. Interpretation of the birthplace varied from one enumerator to another. Some failed to identify specific birthplaces within those named countries, and others provided an exact birthplace in countries not designated in the instructions.
There are no separate Indian population schedules in the 1920 census. Inhabitants of reservations were enumerated in the general population schedules. Enumerators were instructed not to report servicemen in the family enumerations but to treat them as residents of their duty posts. The 1920 census includes schedules for overseas military and naval forces.
The original 1920 census schedules were destroyed by authorization of the Eighty-third Congress, so it is not possible to consult originals when microfilm copies prove unreadable.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1920 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Joseph F. Stroud and Naomi P. Nash:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Joseph F. Stroud and Rebecca Satterfield:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of 6Francis M. Stroud [66] (5Isaiah Stroud [22], 4John Stroud [10], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Elizabeth Allstott

148. 7Leroy Stroud, son of 6Francis M. Stroud [66] and Elizabeth Allstott. Born on 23 Dec. 1878 in Indiana.

Married Minnie Crews.

Issue of Leroy Stroud and Minnie Crews:

      i. dau. 8Elizabeth Stroud b. on 16 Aug. 1914 in Coalmont, Clay, Indiana, USA; m. Odis Hollen (31 May 1909 in Crawford–), son of John Hollen and Evaline Jones, on 23 Dec. 1930 in Crawford when 16 years old (Odis was 21 years old).
      ii. son Elgie Stroud b. on 14 Sep. 1909 in Crawford; m. 9Audrey Lois Brubeck (29 Oct. 1914 in Orange–), dau. of Elmer F. Brubeck (son of William B. Brubeck and Minnie E. Eastridge) and 8Claire B. Suddarth [242], on 21 Feb. 1931 in Crawford when 21 years old (Audrey Lois was 16 years old).


Issue of 6Elijah J. Stroud [67] (5Isaiah Stroud [22], 4John Stroud [10], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Rachel Ann Enlow

149. 7Malinda Jane Stroud, dau. of 6Elijah J. Stroud [67] and Rachel Ann Enlow. Born on 6 Nov. 1871 in Crawford, Indiana. Died on 18 June 1944 in Indiana, 72 years old.

Married John Will Megenity, son of Elijah Megenity and Mary Jane _____, on 25 Oct. 1891 in Crawford when 19 years old (John Will was about 24 years old). John Will Megenity b. about 1867 in Crawford.

Issue of Malinda Jane Stroud and John Will Megenity:

      i. dau. 8Ruth Megenity b. on 3 May 1899 in Crawford; m. (1) _____ Holsapple; divorced; m. (2) Joseph Hoffman (27 June 1897 in Dyer, Lake, Indiana–), son of Joseph Hoffman and Katherine Schillo, on 9 Aug. 1933 in Crawford when 34 years old (Joseph was 36 years old).
      ii. son Russell Megenity b. about 1900 in Crawford.
      iii. dau. Anna M. Megenity b. about 1903 in Crawford.
      iv. dau. Mary Alice Megenity b. about 1910 in Crawford.
      v. dau. Edith O. Megenity b. about 1912 in Crawford.
      vi. son Norman E. Megenity b. about 1915 in Crawford.
      vii. son James Arthur Megenity b. in Crawford.
      viii. son Fred Megenity b. in Crawford.
      ix. son Lee Megenity b. in Crawford.

Notes on John Will Megenity:

Census
Date: 01 JAN 1920
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Roll: T625_426, Page: 11B, Line 255
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Megenity, John W., head, age 53 , Melinda J., wife, age 47 , Ruth A., daughter, age 21 , Russell G., son, age 19 , Alma M., duaghter, age 16 , Mary A., daughter, age 9 , Edith O., daughter, age 7 , Norman E., son, age 4
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [86516]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [86517]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [86518]

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): Page 14, Line 109
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Used as source for parents of John.
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [86527]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [86528]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [86529]

Notes for the family of John Will Megenity and Malinda Jane Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book F page 203Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by Issac Bullington, JP.

Sources for John Will Megenity:

Source 1
Title: 1920 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1920 Census was begun on 1 January 1920. The following questions were asked by enumerators: Name of street, avenue road, etc.; house number or farm; number of dwelling in order of visitation; number of family in order of visitation; name of each person whose place of abode was with the family; relationship of person enumerated to the head of the family; whether home owned or rented; if owned, whether free or mortgaged; sex; color or race; age at last birthday; whether single, married, widowed, or divorced; year of immigration to United States; whether naturalized or alien; if naturalized, year of naturalization; whether attended school any time since 1 September 1919; whether able to read; whether able to write; person’s place of birth; mother tongue; father’s place of birth; father’s mother tongue; mother’s place of birth; mother’s mother tongue; whether able to speak English; trade, profession, or particular kind of work done; industry, business, or establishment in which at work; whether employer, salary or wage worker, or working on own account; number of farm schedule.
The date of the enumeration appears on the heading of each page of the census schedule. All responses were to reflect the individual’s status as of 1 January 1920, even if the status had changed between 1 January and the day of enumeration. Children born between 1 January and the day of enumeration were not to be listed, while individuals alive on 1 January but deceased when the enumerator arrived were to be counted.
Unlike the 1910 census, the 1920 census did not have questions regarding unemployment, Union or Confederate military service, number of children, or duration of marriage. It did, however, include four new question columns: one asked the year of naturalization and three inquired about mother tongue. The 1920 census also asked the year of arrival and status of every foreign-born person and inquired about the year of naturalization for those individuals who had become U.S. citizens. In 1920 the census included, for the first time, Guam, American Samoa, and the Panama Canal Zone.
Due to boundary modifications in Europe resulting from World War I, some individuals were uncertain about how to identify their national origin. Enumerators were instructed to spell out the name of the city, state, province, or region of respondents who declared that they or their parents had been born in Germany, Austria-Hungary, Russia, or Turkey. Interpretation of the birthplace varied from one enumerator to another. Some failed to identify specific birthplaces within those named countries, and others provided an exact birthplace in countries not designated in the instructions.
There are no separate Indian population schedules in the 1920 census. Inhabitants of reservations were enumerated in the general population schedules. Enumerators were instructed not to report servicemen in the family enumerations but to treat them as residents of their duty posts. The 1920 census includes schedules for overseas military and naval forces.
The original 1920 census schedules were destroyed by authorization of the Eighty-third Congress, so it is not possible to consult originals when microfilm copies prove unreadable.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1920 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1870 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database details those persons enumerated in the 1870 United States Federal Census, the Ninth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to the actual images of the 1870 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, M593, 1761 rolls; part of Minnesota T132. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1870 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Added to this, enumerators were presented with printed instructions, which account for the greater degree of accuracy compared with earlier censuses. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; age at last birthday (if a child was under one year of age, months of age were to be stated as fractions, such as 1/12); sex; color; profession; occupation or trade of every male and female; value of real estate; place of birth; whether mother and father were of foreign birth; whether born or married within the year and the month; those who could not read; those who could not write; whether deaf, dumb, blind, or insane or “idiotic”. No relationships were shown between members of a household. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1870 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of John Will Megenity and Malinda Jane Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

150. 7Charles W. Stroud, son of 6Elijah J. Stroud [67] and Rachel Ann Enlow. Born in 1872 in Indiana.

Married Mary J. Schoonover on 11 Dec. 1900 in Crawford when 27 or 28 years old (Mary J. was about 16 years old). Mary J. Schoonover b. about 1884 in Indiana.

Issue of Charles W. Stroud and Mary J. Schoonover:

259   i. dau. 8Zoda Harriet Stroud b. on 2 Aug. 1902 in Milltown, Crawford, Indiana.
260   ii. son Leo Edward Stroud b. on 11 Dec. 1904 in Crawford.
      iii. dau. Ruth Lavern Stroud b. in 1908; d. in 1908, an infant.
261   iv. son William Samuel Stroud b. on 2 Nov. 1910 in Indiana.
262   v. dau. Lorraine Francis Stroud b. on 16 July 1912.
      vi. son Charles Franklin Stroud b. in 1919 in Indiana; d. on 26 Nov. 1942 in (Philippines), Fort William McKinley, Manila, 22 or 23 years old; bur. in (Philippines), Manila, Manila American Cemetery, Fort Bonifacio.
263   vii. son Donald Fredrick Stroud b. on 17 Dec. 1923 in Crawford.

Notes on Charles W. Stroud:

Census
Date: 1920
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Roll: T625_426, Page: 5B, Line 123
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Stroud, Charles W., head, 38 , Mary J., wife, age 36 , Leo, son, age 14 , William S., son, age 9 , Lora F., daughter, age 8 , Charles F., son, age 7
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [90913]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [90914]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [90915]

Notes for the family of Charles W. Stroud and Mary J. Schoonover:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book G page 308Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by N. Stephenson, JP.

Sources for Charles W. Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1920 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1920 Census was begun on 1 January 1920. The following questions were asked by enumerators: Name of street, avenue road, etc.; house number or farm; number of dwelling in order of visitation; number of family in order of visitation; name of each person whose place of abode was with the family; relationship of person enumerated to the head of the family; whether home owned or rented; if owned, whether free or mortgaged; sex; color or race; age at last birthday; whether single, married, widowed, or divorced; year of immigration to United States; whether naturalized or alien; if naturalized, year of naturalization; whether attended school any time since 1 September 1919; whether able to read; whether able to write; person’s place of birth; mother tongue; father’s place of birth; father’s mother tongue; mother’s place of birth; mother’s mother tongue; whether able to speak English; trade, profession, or particular kind of work done; industry, business, or establishment in which at work; whether employer, salary or wage worker, or working on own account; number of farm schedule.
The date of the enumeration appears on the heading of each page of the census schedule. All responses were to reflect the individual’s status as of 1 January 1920, even if the status had changed between 1 January and the day of enumeration. Children born between 1 January and the day of enumeration were not to be listed, while individuals alive on 1 January but deceased when the enumerator arrived were to be counted.
Unlike the 1910 census, the 1920 census did not have questions regarding unemployment, Union or Confederate military service, number of children, or duration of marriage. It did, however, include four new question columns: one asked the year of naturalization and three inquired about mother tongue. The 1920 census also asked the year of arrival and status of every foreign-born person and inquired about the year of naturalization for those individuals who had become U.S. citizens. In 1920 the census included, for the first time, Guam, American Samoa, and the Panama Canal Zone.
Due to boundary modifications in Europe resulting from World War I, some individuals were uncertain about how to identify their national origin. Enumerators were instructed to spell out the name of the city, state, province, or region of respondents who declared that they or their parents had been born in Germany, Austria-Hungary, Russia, or Turkey. Interpretation of the birthplace varied from one enumerator to another. Some failed to identify specific birthplaces within those named countries, and others provided an exact birthplace in countries not designated in the instructions.
There are no separate Indian population schedules in the 1920 census. Inhabitants of reservations were enumerated in the general population schedules. Enumerators were instructed not to report servicemen in the family enumerations but to treat them as residents of their duty posts. The 1920 census includes schedules for overseas military and naval forces.
The original 1920 census schedules were destroyed by authorization of the Eighty-third Congress, so it is not possible to consult originals when microfilm copies prove unreadable.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1920 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Charles W. Stroud and Mary J. Schoonover:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of John Key and 6Delana Stroud [73] (5Abraham Stroud [24], 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1])

151. 7Abraham Key, son of John Key and 6Delana Stroud [73]. Born in May 1847 in Indiana. Died in 1926 in Indiana, 78 or 79 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs.

Married 6Nancy Rebecca Stroud [63], dau. of 5Wesley Stroud [21] and Winna _____, on 17 Nov. 1869 in Crawford when 22 years old (Nancy Rebecca was about 23 years old).

Issue of Abraham Key and Nancy Rebecca Stroud:

145   i. son 7Claude E. Key b. in Jan. 1878 in Crawford.

Notes on Abraham Key:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3656@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs, Old Town) Cemetery, Marengo [88182]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0271, Page Number 394D
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Abriham KEY Self M Male W 34 IN Teamster IN IN Rebecca KEY Wife M Female W 39 IN Keeping House IN IN Claudie E. KEY Son S Male W 2 IN IN IN Simon KEY Brother S Male W 15 IN Works On Farm IN IN William ADAMS Other S Male W 38 IN Mail Carrier No Relation IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [88200]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [88201]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [88202]

Notes for the family of Abraham Key and Nancy Rebecca Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C page 470Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by John H. Bobbitt, ADM

Sources for Abraham Key:

Source 1
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Abraham Key and Nancy Rebecca Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

152. 7Simon E. Key, son of John Key and 6Delana Stroud [73]. Born on 18 Sep. 1859 in Orange, Indiana. Died on 29 Dec. 1940 in Orange, 81 years old. Buried in Orange, Indiana, Bluff Springs Cemetery.

Married Nancy Adeline Wells, dau. of Levi Wells (son of Jesse Wells and Margaret Moore) and Rebecca Ellen Self, in Orange. Nancy Adeline Wells b. in 1867 in Orange; d. on 7 March 1900 in Orange, 32 or 33 years old; bur. in Orange.

Issue of Simon E. Key and Nancy Adeline Wells:

264   i. son 8Elmer O. Key b. on 24 Aug. 1889 in Orange.
      ii. son Edward R. Key b. on 1 Nov. 1890 in Orange; d. on 9 April 1989 in Corydon, Harrison, Indiana, 98 years old; bur. in Orange; m. Nellie M. Manship (Sep. 1895 in Orange–), dau. of Samuel Manship, on 3 Jan. 1913 in Orange when 22 years old (Nellie M. was 17 years old).
      iii. dau. _____ Key b. on 28 Jan. 1893 in Orange.
265   iv. dau. Lula Adelle Key b. on 4 March 1894 in Orange.

Notes on Simon E. Key:

Death
Note: KEY,Simon; “Valeene---SIMON E. KEY, son of John and Lana Stroud Key, was born September 18, 1859 and died December 29, 1940, at the age of 81 years, 3 months and 11 days. He was the youngest of a family of six children, all of them having passed to the great beyond. Most of his life hasbeen spent in this community among friends and neighbors, where he will be greatly missed. In his early life he was married to Nancy Adeline Wells and to this union were born four children, Elmer and Edd Key, and Mrs. Lula Lines, all of near Valeene, also a child who died in infancy. All his life he hadfaith in the Great Master, and in August 1940, he placed his membership in the Methodist Church. Mr. Key had been afficted for several months but bore his pain with great patience. Besides his children, he has nine grandchildren and five great grandchildren

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I11877@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Orange, Indiana, Bluff Springs Cemetery, Southeast Township, Valeene, Section 15 T1s R1e [209742]

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Crawford, Indiana
Note: Living with brother Abraham & family.

Notes on Nancy Adeline Wells:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I11882@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Orange, Indiana, Bluff Springs Cemetery, Southeast Township, Valeene, Section 15 T1s R1e [209865]


Issue of 6Rial Stroud [74] (5Abraham Stroud [24], 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Martha E. Neal

153. 7Joab Stroud, son of 6Rial Stroud [74] and Martha E. Neal. Born on 13 Oct. 1857 in Crawford, Indiana. Died on 9 Dec. 1927 in Crawford, 70 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Mathers Cemetery.

Married Melissa Mathers, dau. of William Tobias Mathers (son of James Mathers and Mary Key) and Mary Sillings (dau. of Shadreck Sillings and Martha Potter), on 20 Sep. 1885 in Crawford when 27 years old (Melissa was 28 years old). Melissa Mathers b. on 13 Oct. 1856 in Crawford; d. on 9 March 1918 in Crawford, 61 years old; bur. in Crawford.

Issue of Joab Stroud and Melissa Mathers:

266   i. son 8Claude D. Stroud b. on 6 July 1886 in Crawford.
267   ii. dau. Maude Stroud b. on 9 Sep. 1888 in Crawford.
268   iii. dau. Laura Stroud b. on 4 March 1891 in Indiana.
269   iv. son Ernest Stroud b. on 24 Feb. 1893.
      v. dau. Daisy Stroud b. on 7 Aug. 1896; d. in 1899 in Crawford, two or three years old; bur. in Crawford.

Notes on Joab Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I518@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Mathers Cemetery, English [19585]

Census
Date: 1910
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township, District 34
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 36, line 256
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Stroud, Joab, head, age 53, m 24 yrs , Lizzie, wife, age 53, m 24 yrs, 5 born 4 living , Laura, daughter, age 18, s

Notes for the family of Joab Stroud and Melissa Mathers:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book E page 366Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by John W. Wilkes, MG.

Sources for Joab Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1910 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, actual images of the 1910 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, T624, 1784 rolls may be browsed by selecting a state, county, township, and enumeration district.
Enumerators of the 1910 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; relationship to head of family; age at last birthday; sex; color or race; whether single, married, widowed, or divorced; number of years of present marriage; number of children born; number of children now living; birthplace; mother tongue; birthplace of father and mother; mother tongue of father and mother; year of immigration to the U.S.; whether naturalized or alien; whether able to speak English, or if not, give language spoken; trade or profession; industry; whether employer, employee, or working on own account; if an employee, whether out of work on April 15, 1910; if an employee, number of weeks out of work during year 1909, whether able to read; whether able to write; attended school any time since September 1, 1909; home owned or rented; home owned free or mortgaged; farm or house; number of farm schedule; whether a survivor of the Union or Confederate Army or Navy; whether blind; whether deaf and dumb. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1910 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Joab Stroud and Melissa Mathers:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Melissa Mathers:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I517@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Mathers Cemetery, English [19566]

154. 7William Riley Stroud, son of 6Rial Stroud [74] and Martha E. Neal. Born on 12 Nov. 1861 in Milltown, Crawford, Indiana. Died on 15 March 1939 in Temple, Crawford, Indiana, USA, 77 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Mathers Cemetery.

Married Mary Ann Mathers, dau. of William Tobias Mathers (son of James Mathers and Mary Key) and Mary Sillings (dau. of Shadreck Sillings and Martha Potter), on 31 Aug. 1882 in Crawford, Indiana when 20 years old (Mary Ann was 17 years old). Mary Ann Mathers b. on 27 June 1865 in Crawford; d. on 5 July 1901 in Temple, 36 years old; bur. in Crawford.

Issue of William Riley Stroud and Mary Ann Mathers:

      i. son 8Charles Curtis Stroud b. about 1883; d. about 1895, about twelve years old; bur. in Crawford.
270   ii. dau. Lulu Pearl Stroud b. on 5 Oct. 1887 in Crawford.
271   iii. dau. Clara Ann Stroud b. on 13 March 1889 in Crawford.
272   iv. dau. Minnie Dell Stroud b. on 27 June 1891 in Crawford.
      v. son Clarence Alva Stroud b. on 13 March 1894 in Temple; d. on 26 Sep. 1918 in (France), 24 years old; bur. in (France), Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery, Romagne; m. Ruth Evelyn Ridgley (21 May 1898–May 1973 in Saint Francisville, Lawrence, Illinois) on 7 July 1917 in Saint Francisville when 23 years old (Ruth Evelyn was 19 years old).
273   vi. son Ivan Cecil Stroud b. on 19 May 1895 in Temple.
274   vii. dau. Versie Hazel Stroud b. on 29 Oct. 1899 in Temple.

Notes on William Riley Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I320@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Mathers Cemetery, English [15395]

Census
Date: 1900
Place: , Crawford, Indiana
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Sterling Twp, Crawford, Indiana, Entry 123-32/7-90
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Census
Date: 1910
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): Page 26, line 259
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Stroud, William R, head, age 48, wd Curl, Clara, daughter, age 21, m, 1 yr, 1 born 1 living Stroud, Minnie, daughter, age 19, s , Clarence, son, age 17, s , Ivan, son, age 14, s , Versie, daughter, age 11, s Curl, Arthur, grandson, age 2/12, s

Census
Date: 1920
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township
See source 3 for this person
Page(s): Roll: T625_426, Page: 7A, Line 185
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Stroud, William R., head, age 59 Dillman, Bessie H., daughter, age 20 , Artie B., son in law, age 19 , Olive L., grandaughter, age 2/12

Census
Date: 1930
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township
See source 4 for this person
Page(s): , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township, District 11
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: William (HD) age 69 Ivan (S) age 34, Mildred (DL) age 27, Junior (GS) age 2 7/12
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [15438]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [15439]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [15440]

Event
Type: Photo Event
See source 5 for this person
Extracted text: William R. Stroud
Media format: jpg
Media file: Stroud - 0007.jpg
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [15462]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [15463]

Media link
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 2 _SCBK Y [15471]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 2 _PRIM Y [15472]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 2 _TYPE PHOTO [15473]

Family Bible recorded d.o.b. as 13 Nov 1865

No listing for Charles Curtis Lulu P. as b. Oct 1885 Clara A. as b. Mar 1888 Name Minnie as Mamie b. Jun 1890 Clarence A. as b. May 1893 Name Ivan C. as Cecil J. b. May 1895 All above family page entries are from family records.

William Stroud worked as a laborer helping build Dam 44 on the Ohio River.

Note: Versie always wrote middle name as Raleigh.

Notes for the family of William Riley Stroud and Mary Ann Mathers:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book E Page157Assessment: 4Note: Married by A. J. Goodman, MG.Extracted text: There are two handwritten notes attached to the marriage record for William and Mary Ann that were written by the same person, apparently, William Mathers. The handwriting is obviously the same, however the note from Rial Stroud has his name followed by the entry “his mark” followed by an “x”. On the note from William Mathers, there is his signature.Media format: jpgMedia file: stroud - 0191.jpgSee source 2 for this familyExtracted text: Marriage Certificate of Willaim Stroud and Mary Mathers with permission notes from Rial stroud and William MathersMedia format: jpgMedia file: stroud - 0191.jpgSee source 2 for this familyExtracted text: Back-left to right: Clarence Stroud, Minnie Stroud, Ivan Stroud, Lulu not in picture From left to right: Clara Stroud, William Stroud, Versie Stroud.Media format: jpgMedia file: Stroud - 0002.jpgSee source 2 for this familyExtracted text: Clara, Ivan & Versie StroudMedia format: jpgMedia file: stroud - 0020.jpgSee source 2 for this familyExtracted text: Ivan Stroud on left and Clarence Stroud on right - last leave home!Media format: jpgMedia file: stroud - 0087a.jpgSee source 2 for this familyExtracted text: Left to Right - William R. Stroud, Children; Lulu, Versie, Clara, IvanMedia format: jpgMedia file: stroud - 0096.jpgSee source 2 for this familyExtracted text: L to R - Clara Stroud Gresham holding Ruth , Beulah on left of Clara, and Arthur Curl in front of Clara, Lulu Stroud Thornell holding Ralph, Bill Thornell, Thelma.Media format: jpgMedia file: stroud - 0106.jpg

Sources for William Riley Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1900 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database is an index to all individuals enumerated in the 1900 United States Federal Census, the Twelfth Census of the United States. In addition, the names of those listed on the population schedule are linked to actual images of the 1900 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, T623, 1854 rolls. (If you do not initially find the name on the page that you are linked to, try a few pages forward or backward, as sometimes different pages had the same page number.)
Enumerators of the 1900 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; address; relationship to the head of household; color or race; sex; month and year of birth; age at last birthday; marital status; number of years married; the total number of children born of the mother; the number of those children living; places of birth of each individual and the parents of each individual; if the individual was foreign born, the year of immigration and the number of years in the United States; the citizenship status of foreign-born individuals over age twenty-one; occupation; whether the person could read, write, and speak English; whether the home was owned or rented; whether the home was on a farm; and whether the home was mortgaged. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1900 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1910 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, actual images of the 1910 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, T624, 1784 rolls may be browsed by selecting a state, county, township, and enumeration district.
Enumerators of the 1910 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; relationship to head of family; age at last birthday; sex; color or race; whether single, married, widowed, or divorced; number of years of present marriage; number of children born; number of children now living; birthplace; mother tongue; birthplace of father and mother; mother tongue of father and mother; year of immigration to the U.S.; whether naturalized or alien; whether able to speak English, or if not, give language spoken; trade or profession; industry; whether employer, employee, or working on own account; if an employee, whether out of work on April 15, 1910; if an employee, number of weeks out of work during year 1909, whether able to read; whether able to write; attended school any time since September 1, 1909; home owned or rented; home owned free or mortgaged; farm or house; number of farm schedule; whether a survivor of the Union or Confederate Army or Navy; whether blind; whether deaf and dumb. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1910 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 3
Title: 1920 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1920 Census was begun on 1 January 1920. The following questions were asked by enumerators: Name of street, avenue road, etc.; house number or farm; number of dwelling in order of visitation; number of family in order of visitation; name of each person whose place of abode was with the family; relationship of person enumerated to the head of the family; whether home owned or rented; if owned, whether free or mortgaged; sex; color or race; age at last birthday; whether single, married, widowed, or divorced; year of immigration to United States; whether naturalized or alien; if naturalized, year of naturalization; whether attended school any time since 1 September 1919; whether able to read; whether able to write; person’s place of birth; mother tongue; father’s place of birth; father’s mother tongue; mother’s place of birth; mother’s mother tongue; whether able to speak English; trade, profession, or particular kind of work done; industry, business, or establishment in which at work; whether employer, salary or wage worker, or working on own account; number of farm schedule.
The date of the enumeration appears on the heading of each page of the census schedule. All responses were to reflect the individual’s status as of 1 January 1920, even if the status had changed between 1 January and the day of enumeration. Children born between 1 January and the day of enumeration were not to be listed, while individuals alive on 1 January but deceased when the enumerator arrived were to be counted.
Unlike the 1910 census, the 1920 census did not have questions regarding unemployment, Union or Confederate military service, number of children, or duration of marriage. It did, however, include four new question columns: one asked the year of naturalization and three inquired about mother tongue. The 1920 census also asked the year of arrival and status of every foreign-born person and inquired about the year of naturalization for those individuals who had become U.S. citizens. In 1920 the census included, for the first time, Guam, American Samoa, and the Panama Canal Zone.
Due to boundary modifications in Europe resulting from World War I, some individuals were uncertain about how to identify their national origin. Enumerators were instructed to spell out the name of the city, state, province, or region of respondents who declared that they or their parents had been born in Germany, Austria-Hungary, Russia, or Turkey. Interpretation of the birthplace varied from one enumerator to another. Some failed to identify specific birthplaces within those named countries, and others provided an exact birthplace in countries not designated in the instructions.
There are no separate Indian population schedules in the 1920 census. Inhabitants of reservations were enumerated in the general population schedules. Enumerators were instructed not to report servicemen in the family enumerations but to treat them as residents of their duty posts. The 1920 census includes schedules for overseas military and naval forces.
The original 1920 census schedules were destroyed by authorization of the Eighty-third Congress, so it is not possible to consult originals when microfilm copies prove unreadable.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1920 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 4
Title: 1930 US Census
ABBR: 1930 US Census
_TAG:
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 5
Title: Family Photos
Extracted Text:
Clarence A. and Agnes I. Dillman Collection
MEDI: Personal
ABBR: Family Photos
_QUOTED: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of William Riley Stroud and Mary Ann Mathers:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: Family Photos
Extracted Text:
Clarence A. and Agnes I. Dillman Collection
MEDI: Personal
ABBR: Family Photos
_QUOTED: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Mary Ann Mathers:

Birth
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Mary Ann Mathers
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 DATE 14 SEP 1886 [15994]
Extracted text: Note: Records are unclear as to the exact date of birth of John Thomas and Mary Ann. John’s family and census records show his DOB as Mar 20, 1865. This is also on his death cert and gravestone. The family of Mary Ann Stroud say that she was born on June 27, 1865 which is also on her death cert and gravestone. Question to be researched!

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I328@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Mathers Cemetery, English [16006]

Sources for Mary Ann Mathers:

Source 1
Title: Notes of Bertha and Lula Mathers
ABBR: Notes of Bertha and Lula Mathers
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of 6Rial Stroud [74] (5Abraham Stroud [24], 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Martha Jane Dooley

155. 7Herman Tilden Stroud, son of 6Rial Stroud [74] and Martha Jane Dooley. Born on 4 July 1881 in Indiana. Died on 1 April 1966 in Milltown, Crawford, Indiana, 84 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Mathers Cemetery.

Married Myrtle Laura White, dau. of William S. White (son of Benajmin V. White and Lydia Margaret Sillings) and Mary Alice Hall, on 6 July 1903 in Crawford when 22 years old (Myrtle Laura was 16 years old). Myrtle Laura White b. on 14 Nov. 1886 in Billett, Lawrence, Illinois, USA; d. on 13 May 1969 in Depauw, Harrison, Indiana, 82 years old; bur. in Crawford.

Issue of Herman Tilden Stroud and Myrtle Laura White:

      i. dau. 8Mary Stroud b. about 1905 in Indiana.
275   ii. son Edford E. Stroud b. on 8 July 1907 in Crawford.
276   iii. son Tilden Richard Stroud b. on 14 Sep. 1912 in Crawford.
      iv. dau. Hattie J. Stroud b. on 19 Dec. 1915 in Crawford; m. Charles A. Deweese (9 Sep. 1906 in Washington–April 1966 in Milltown), son of Irvine Claudius Mitchell Deweese (son of John ’Thomas’ Deweese and Ruthena Crecelius) and Anne King, on 25 March 1939 in Crawford when 23 years old (Charles A. was 32 years old).
      v. dau. Rosetta Stroud b. about 1920 in Indiana; m. _____ Watson.
      vi. dau. Inez L. Stroud b. on 24 April 1924 in Pekin, Washington, Indiana; m. William J. Mosier (4 June 1922 in Depauw–23 April 1995 in Depauw), son of Edgar Mosier and Violet Jacobs.
277   vii. son Edward William Stroud b. on 25 March 1925 in Temple, Crawford, Indiana, USA.

Notes on Herman Tilden Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3051@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Mathers Cemetery, English [72951]

Census
Date: 1910
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Sterling Township, District 34
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 28, line 276
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Stroud, Harry F., age 27, m 6 yrs. , Myrtle, wife, age 23, m 6 yrs, 2 born 2 living , Mary, daughter, age 5, s , Edford, son, age 2, s , Elizabeth, aunt, age 82, wd, 7 born 2 living

Notes for the family of Herman Tilden Stroud and Myrtle Laura White:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book G Paage 505Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by Thomas J. Brown, JP.

Sources for Herman Tilden Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1910 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, actual images of the 1910 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, T624, 1784 rolls may be browsed by selecting a state, county, township, and enumeration district.
Enumerators of the 1910 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; relationship to head of family; age at last birthday; sex; color or race; whether single, married, widowed, or divorced; number of years of present marriage; number of children born; number of children now living; birthplace; mother tongue; birthplace of father and mother; mother tongue of father and mother; year of immigration to the U.S.; whether naturalized or alien; whether able to speak English, or if not, give language spoken; trade or profession; industry; whether employer, employee, or working on own account; if an employee, whether out of work on April 15, 1910; if an employee, number of weeks out of work during year 1909, whether able to read; whether able to write; attended school any time since September 1, 1909; home owned or rented; home owned free or mortgaged; farm or house; number of farm schedule; whether a survivor of the Union or Confederate Army or Navy; whether blind; whether deaf and dumb. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1910 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Herman Tilden Stroud and Myrtle Laura White:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Myrtle Laura White:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3368@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Mathers Cemetery, English [80808]

156. 7Pearl V. Stroud, dau. of 6Rial Stroud [74] and Martha Jane Dooley. Born on 1 April 1893 in Crawford, Indiana. Died in May 1973 in English, Crawford, Indiana, 80 years old.

Married first Omer E. Brown, son of John W. Brown and Martha Bennett, on 22 Nov. 1909 in Crawford when 16 years old (Omer E. was 22 years old). Divorced. Omer E. Brown b. on 25 March 1887 in Crawford.

Issue of Pearl V. Stroud and Omer E. Brown:

      i. dau. 8Nellie Brown b. in 1912 in Indiana.
      ii. son Clifton Brown b. on 27 April 1913 in Orange.

Married second Luther B. Turner, son of Charles H. Turner and Malinda Jane Denbo (dau. of Woodfield Grant Denbo and Lucinda J. Mathers), on 18 April 1928 in Crawford when 35 years old (Luther B. was 41 years old). Luther B. Turner b. on 18 July 1886 in Crawford; d. on 3 March 1988 in Leavenworth, Crawford, Indiana, 101 years old; m. (1) Zena M. Hicks (16 June 1880 in Crawford–), dau. of Marion Hicks and Sarah Roberson, on 22 Feb. 1923 in Crawford when 36 years old (Zena M. was 42 years old); divorced.

Issue of Pearl V. Stroud and Luther B. Turner:

      iii. son 8James A. Turner b. about 1928 in Indiana.

Notes on Omer E. Brown:

Notes for the family of Omer E. Brown and Pearl V. Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book J Page 8Assessment: 4Note: Married by J. W. Trowbridge, MG.Divorce: OCT 1927Date: OCT 1927

Sources for the family of Omer E. Brown and Pearl V. Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Luther B. Turner:

Census
Date: 1930
Place: , Jay, Indiana, Richland Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Roll: 595; Page: 9B; Enumeration District: 14
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Turner, Luther B., age 43, born Indiana , Pearl, age 36, born Indiana , James A., age 1 5/12, born Indiana
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [104792]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [104793]

(Research):In 1910 we find a Luther B. Turner 23, born Indiana, living in Fayette County, Illinois with wife Rachel P. age 20, born Illinois and son Henry T., age 9/12. Could theis be the same person?

Notes for the family of Luther B. Turner and Pearl V. Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book M page 257Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by Leonard Cummins,MG.

Notes for the family of Luther B. Turner and Zena M. Hicks:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book L page 383Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by Leonard Cummins, MG.MarriageNote: This was the second marriage for Luther, he stated that he had previoulsy divorced on june 1921.Divorce: 1928Date: 1928

Sources for Luther B. Turner:

Source 1
Title: 1930 US Census
ABBR: 1930 US Census
_TAG:
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Luther B. Turner and Pearl V. Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Luther B. Turner and Zena M. Hicks:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of 6Allen Stroud [75] (5Abraham Stroud [24], 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Elizabeth Ann Toney

157. 7Armina Jane Stroud, dau. of 6Allen Stroud [75] and Elizabeth Ann Toney. Born about 1864 in Indiana.

Married Charles L. Stewart, son of Dr. Lewis Byrum Stewart (son of David Mitchell Stewart and Annie Sloan) and Cynthia Ann Weathers (dau. of Richard Weathers and Chloe Jones), on 21 Oct. 1888 in Crawford when about 24 years old (Charles L. was 36 or 37 years old). Charles L. Stewart b. in 1851 in Indiana; m. (2) Helen Morton in 1897 in Crawford when 45 or 46 years old.

Issue of Armina Jane Stroud and Charles L. Stewart:

      i. dau. 8Fern Stewart b. on 25 Sep. 1893 in Marengo, Crawford, Indiana, USA; m. (1) _____ Taylor; divorced; m. (2) Robert J. S. Freyberger (1 Jan. 1896 in Dubois–), son of John A. Freyberger and Barbara Neuham, on 10 Dec. 1935 in Crawford when 42 years old (Robert J. S. was 39 years old).

Notes on Charles L. Stewart:

Notes for the family of Charles L. Stewart and Armina Jane Stroud:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book F page 11Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by John M. Johnson, MGMarriage License: , Crawford, IndianaPlace: , Crawford, IndianaSee source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book F Page 11Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Sources for the family of Charles L. Stewart and Armina Jane Stroud:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

158. 7Monzelle Stroud, dau. of 6Allen Stroud [75] and Elizabeth Ann Toney. Born about 1866 in Indiana.

Married Albert J. Bailey. Albert J. Bailey b. in Crawford.

Issue of Monzelle Stroud and Albert J. Bailey:

      i. dau. 8Ada G. Bailey b. on 2 April 1884 in Crawford; m. Samuel H. Bline (15 June 1873 in Harrison, Indiana, Spencer Township–), son of Joseph L. Bline and Charity Caroline Summers, on 22 Sep. 1915 in Crawford when 31 years old (Samuel H. was 42 years old).

Notes on Monzelle Stroud:

If this is Nova M. STROUD, then she married Elisha M. JONES 1 Sep 1889 in Orange Co., IN.

159. 7John W. Stroud, son of 6Allen Stroud [75] and Elizabeth Ann Toney. Born about 1873 in Indiana. Died before 1929.

Married Dovie N. Weathers, dau. of Albert Thomas Weathers (son of Squire Beauchamp Weathers and Ruth Sharp) and Rebecca M. Boswell, on 6 Jan. 1899 in Orange when about 26 years old (Dovie N. was 22 years old). Dovie N. Weathers b. on 27 March 1876 in Crawford.

Issue of John W. Stroud and Dovie N. Weathers:

278   i. dau. 8Renetta Marie Stroud b. on 2 April 1899 in Orange.

Notes on John W. Stroud:

Census
Date: 1900
Place: , Orange, Indiana
Note: census, Southeast Township.

Notes for the family of John W. Stroud and Dovie N. Weathers:

MarriageNote: Record C-9 3241899 marriage needs to be verified against original records to see if a misprint may have occurred for this marriage.Marriage License: , Orange, IndianaPlace: , Orange, Indiana


Issue of 6James Watson (Wilson) Stroud [79] (5William Stroud [25], 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Emma Ann Williams

160. 7John William Stroud, son of 6James Watson (Wilson) Stroud [79] and Emma Ann Williams. Born in July 1860 in Clay City, Clay, Indiana, USA. Died on 19 Dec. 1901 in Effingham, Illinois, Jackson Township, 41 years old.

Married Sarah Ann Reynolds, dau. of Wade Reynolds and Julia Alden, on 24 Aug. 1887 when 27 years old (Sarah Ann was 18 years old). Sarah Ann Reynolds b. on 13 Dec. 1868 in Kansas; d. on 25 June 1936 in Effingham, 67 years old.

Issue of John William Stroud and Sarah Ann Reynolds:

279   i. dau. 8Lola Mabel Stroud b. on 8 Sep. 1889 in Illinois.
      ii. son Nobel Stroud b. on 5 Aug. 1891 in Effingham, Effingham, Illinois; d. in May 1892 in Effingham, about nine months old.
      iii. dau. Maudie Stroud b. in Feb. 1893 in Effingham; d. on 23 July 1911 in Effingham, 18 years old; bur. in Effingham, Illinois, Watson Cemetery.
      iv. son John Delbert Stroud b. on 30 June 1895 in Watson, Effingham, Illinois; d. on 3 March 1980 in Odin, Marion, Illinois, 84 years old; bur. in Marion, Illinois, Peaceful Valley Cemetery; m. Viola Davis.
      v. dau. Goldie Irene Stroud b. on 5 Jan. 1898 in Watson; d. on 24 April 1986 in Odin, 88 years old; bur. in Marion; m. Edward William Davis on 16 Sep. 1922 in Saint Louis, Saint Louis, Missouri when 24 years old.
280   vi. son Gorman Spencer Stroud b. on 22 Aug. 1899 in Watson.

161. 7Nancy Isabelle Stroud, dau. of 6James Watson (Wilson) Stroud [79] and Emma Ann Williams. Born on 5 April 1863 in Clay City, Clay, Indiana, USA. Died on 20 April 1935 in Effingham, Effingham, Illinois, 72 years old. Buried in Effingham, Illinois, Watson Cemetery.

Married William H. Pontious on 9 March 1892 in Effingham, Illinois, Jackson Township when 28 years old.

Issue of Nancy Isabelle Stroud and William H. Pontious:

      i. son 8Clarence M. Pontious b. on 22 May 1897; d. in Nov. 1974 in Effingham, 77 years old.

Notes on Nancy Isabelle Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3674@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Effingham, Illinois, Watson Cemetery, Watson [88514]

162. 7Alexander Stroud, son of 6James Watson (Wilson) Stroud [79] and Emma Ann Williams. Born in April 1865 in Indiana.

Married Lottie McKENNAN (EVANS) on 25 Feb. 1892 in Effingham, Illinois when 26 years old (Lottie was 26 years old). Lottie McKENNAN (EVANS) b. in March 1865 in Indiana.

Issue of Alexander Stroud and Lottie McKENNAN (EVANS):

      i. dau. 8Flossy Stroud b. in March 1895.
      ii. dau. Goldie Stroud b. in Feb. 1898.

Notes on Alexander Stroud:

Sherman STROUD Who is this? Brother or son of Alexander STROUD? Phil BELLANGER has d.o.b. as Feb 1867, but this cannot be correct if this is a son of Alexander! Check this out!!!


Issue of 6Annel Stroud [80] (5William Stroud [25], 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Martha A. Huffstutter

163. 7Walter Stroud, son of 6Annel Stroud [80] and Martha A. Huffstutter. Born on 4 March 1861/2 in Harrison, Indiana. Died on 9 May 1937 in Nevada, Vernon, Missouri. Buried in Vernon, Missouri, Marvin Chapel Cemetery.

Married first Francis J. Stukesberry, dau. of William Stukesberry, on 16 Dec. 1883 in Vernon, Missouri (Francis J. was about 16 years old). Francis J. Stukesberry b. about 1867 in Missouri; d. before 1885 in Vernon; bur. in Vernon.

Married second Cora Agenne on 27 July 1885 in Vernon. Cora Agenne d. before 1890 in Vernon; bur. in Vernon.

Issue of Walter Stroud and Cora Agenne:

281   i. son 8George Curtis Stroud b. on 15 May 1886 in Vernon, Missouri, Sandstone Township.

Married third Iva Alice Conkle, dau. of Jacob Conkle and Magra Eleanor Hawk, on 7 Oct. 1890 in Vernon (Iva Alice was 29 years old). Iva Alice Conkle b. on 31 March 1861 in Bucyrus, Crawford, Ohio; d. on 24 Sep. 1923 in Nevada, 62 years old; bur. in Vernon.

Issue of Walter Stroud and Iva Alice Conkle:

      ii. dau. 8Margery Alice Stroud b. on 30 July 1891 in Vernon, Missouri, Virgil Township; d. on 21 Feb. 1978 in Eldorado Springs, Cedar, Missouri, 86 years old; bur. in Vernon, Missouri, Mount Vernon Cemetery; m. Jacob Leonidas Stout (7 Feb. 1889–Aug. 1964 in Missouri) on 27 Feb. 1915 when 23 years old (Jacob Leonidas was 26 years old).
      iii. dau. Bessie May Stroud b. on 24 Oct. 1892 in Vernon; d. on 6 May 1980 in El Dorado Springs, Cedar, Missouri, 87 years old; bur. in Nevada; m. John W. Latta (13 Dec. 1887–15 Oct. 1969 in Missouri) on 10 March 1913 when 20 years old (John W. was 25 years old).
282   iv. dau. Esther Lee Stroud b. on 7 Oct. 1896 in Vernon.
      v. dau. Infant Stroud b. on 8 May 1900 in Vernon; d. about 1900 in Vernon, an infant.
      vi. son Walter Stroud b. on 25 Oct. 1901 in Vernon; d. in April 1986, 84 years old; m. Jesse Irene Gossett (7 Jan. 1902–15 Nov. 1996).

Married fourth Addie Duff on 27 Oct. 1925 in Olathe, Johnson, Kansas.

Notes on Walter Stroud:

Census
Date: 1870
Place: , Harrison, Indiana
Note: census, Blue River Township, p 7, age 8 yrs

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Effingham, Illinois
Note: census, Jackson Township, p 400, age 18 yrs

Census
Date: 1900
Place: , Vernon, Missouri
Note: census, Virgil Township, p 136, age 39 yrs

Census
Date: 1910
Place: , Vernon, Missouri
Note: census, 126 0136 0056


Issue of 6Annel Stroud [80] (5William Stroud [25], 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Elizabeth Moon

164. 7Katie May Stroud, dau. of 6Annel Stroud [80] and Elizabeth Moon. Born on 5 April 1894 in Vernon, Missouri. Buried in Cherokee, Cherokee, Iowa, USA.

Married Jesse Byerly. Jesse Byerly b. on 2 Nov. 1891; d. on 30 March 1982, 90 years old; bur. in Cherokee.

Issue of Katie May Stroud and Jesse Byerly:

      i. dau. 8Genevieve Byerly b. on 6 June 1914 in Missouri; d. on 11 Feb. 1999, 84 years old; m. Frank Day.
      ii. son Joseph Byerly b. on 27 Jan. 1916 in Iowa; d. on 13 April 1996 in Cherokee, 80 years old; m. Edith Polston.
      iii. son Anuel Byerly b. on 20 July 1918 in Iowa; m. Dorothy Ferick.
      iv. dau. Infant Byerly b. about 1920.
      v. dau. Infant Byerly b. about 1920.
      vi. dau. Louise Byerly b. on 9 June 1924 in Independence, Jackson, Missouri; m. Alex Clark.
      vii. son Kenneth Byerly b. on 22 Dec. 1931.
      viii. son Jay Byerly b. on 7 Oct. 1933.

165. 7Annel Stroud, son of 6Annel Stroud [80] and Elizabeth Moon. Born on 5 April 1894 in Vernon, Missouri. Died in 1952, 57 or 58 years old.

Married Annie Stratton on 18 July 1919 when 25 years old (Annie was 17 years old). Annie Stratton b. on 13 Sep. 1901; d. on 25 April 1993 in Quimby, Cherokee, Iowa, 91 years old.

Issue of Annel Stroud and Annie Stratton:

      i. dau. 8Elizabeth Stroud b. on 22 Feb. 1920; m. Anthony Reinert.
      ii. dau. Dorothy Ellen Stroud b. on 9 April 1921; m. Donald Clark.
      iii. son Garland Anuel Stroud b. on 11 March 1922; d. on 28 Dec. 1996 in Brooksville, Hernando, Florida, USA, 74 years old; m. Lillian Smith.
      iv. dau. Evelyn Mae Stroud b. on 9 Oct. 1923; m. Albert Hendricksen.
      v. son Darrell Charles Stroud b. on 15 Aug. 1925 in Indiana; m. (1) Doris Brandt; m. (2) Betty Louise (True) Stroud (23 Dec. 1932 in Frankfort, Franklin, Kentucky–), dau. of John Mason True and Hazel Jones.
      vi. dau. Betty Jane Stroud b. on 1 March 1928 in Crawford; m. Richard Stevenson.
      vii. son Roy Alfred Stroud b. on 25 Aug. 1933; m. Lidia Mordini.
      viii. dau. Anna Belle Stroud b. on 23 Dec. 1934; m. Francis Steele.
      ix. son Jerry Kay Stroud b. on 28 May 1942; m. (1) Azelia Huck; m. (2) Bonnie Maddox.

Notes on Annie Stratton:

51049

485-32-2493


Issue of David Marion Bruner and 6Nancy Jane Stroud [81] (5William Stroud [25], 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1])

166. 7Amanda Bruner, dau. of David Marion Bruner and 6Nancy Jane Stroud [81]. Born in Nov. 1856 in Harrison, Indiana. Died on 16 Feb. 1939 in Clarksville, Clark, Indiana, USA, 82 years old.

Married Michael Seigle. Michael Seigle b. on 18 Jan. 1854 in Covington, Kenton, Kentucky; d. on 9 May 1915 in Jeffersonville, Clark, Indiana, 61 years old.

Issue of Amanda Bruner and Michael Seigle:

283   i. dau. 8Delia Rosalie Seigle b. on 24 July 1882 in Clarksville.
284   ii. son George Federick Seigle b. on 27 Aug. 1884 in Clarksville.
      iii. dau. Katherine C. Seigle b. on 29 May 1887 in Clarksville; d. on 27 April 1907 in Clarksville, 19 years old.
      iv. dau. Ella Mae Seigle b. on 10 Oct. 1889 in Clarksville; d. on 29 Aug. 1905 in Clarksville, 15 years old.
      v. dau. Anna Pearl Seigle b. in 1892 in Clarksville; d. before 1900 in Clarksville, at most seven years old.


Issue of 6Joseph F. Stroud [82] (5Thomas Stroud Jr. [26], 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Louisa Jane White

167. 7Eliza Jane Stroud, dau. of 6Joseph F. Stroud [82] and Louisa Jane White. Born on 9 May 1858.

Married first William Albert Malinsky. William Albert Malinsky b. about 1852.

Married second John Munday on 7 June 1880 when 22 years old (John was 58 years old). John Munday b. on 7 March 1822; d. on 3 March 1889, 66 years old.

Issue of Eliza Jane Stroud and John Munday:

285   i. son 8Oscar H. Munday b. on 12 Oct. 1882.
286   ii. son John W. Munday b. on 15 March 1887.

Married third James B. Edwards on 7 Sep. 1890 when 32 years old (James B. was 37 years old). James B. Edwards b. on 16 March 1853; d. on 21 Sep. 1900, 47 years old.

Issue of Eliza Jane Stroud and James B. Edwards:

287   iii. dau. 8Lula Ethel Edwards b. on 2 Aug. 1894.
      iv. son James Franklin Edwards b. on 21 Jan. 1896; d. on 11 Sep. 1941, 45 years old; m. (1) _____ Lorena; m. (2) Lyda Purvis.
      v. son Charles E. Edwards b. on 12 July 1898; m. _____ Lota on 8 Nov. 1919 when 21 years old.

168. 7Hannibal Hamlin Stroud, son of 6Joseph F. Stroud [82] and Louisa Jane White. Born in March 1861. Died on 15 May 1930, 69 years old.

Married Ida Belle Davis, dau. of F. J. Davis and Adaline Russell, on 9 June 1883 in Effingham, Illinois when 22 years old (Ida Belle was about 17 years old). Ida Belle Davis b. about 1866; d. in 1928, about 62 years old.

Issue of Hannibal Hamlin Stroud and Ida Belle Davis:

      i. dau. 8Infant Stroud .
      ii. son Foster Elwood Stroud b. on 16 Dec. 1884.
288   iii. son Ellsworth Hamilton Stroud b. before 22 April 1888/9.
      iv. son Oscar M. Stroud b. on 30 Sep. 1897; d. in March 1974 in Manassas, Manassas (City), Virginia, 76 years old.
      v. dau. Bessie B. Stroud b. in 1901; m. _____ Hancher.
      vi. dau. Belva Grace Stroud b. on 16 Feb. 1903; m. _____ Hadden.
      vii. son Otto Charles Stroud b. on 22 Aug. 1905.
      viii. son Lloyd Raymond Stroud b. on 6 March 1908; d. in July 1969 in Greenup, Cumberland, Illinois, USA, 61 years old.


Issue of 6Ner Stroud [85] (5Thomas Stroud Jr. [26], 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Mary Francis Merry

169. 7Mary Elizabeth Stroud, dau. of 6Ner Stroud [85] and Mary Francis Merry. Born on 27 Jan. 1868 in Winterrowd, Effingham, Illinois.

Married Aberdell Flinn. Aberdell Flinn b. in Feb. 1871.

Issue of Mary Elizabeth Stroud and Aberdell Flinn:

      i. son 8Clarence Flinn m. (1) Gladys Woody; m. (2) _____ Lucille.
      ii. dau. Losia Flinn m. D. Chesnut.
289   iii. son John Alvin Flinn b. on 21 Nov. 1892.

170. 7Hattie Elizabeth Stroud, dau. of 6Ner Stroud [85] and Mary Francis Merry. Born on 29 Sep. 1875 in Winterrowd, Effingham, Illinois. Died in 1963, 87 or 88 years old.

Married Charles Edgar Lewis on 26 Jan. 1896 when 20 years old (Charles Edgar was 20 years old). Charles Edgar Lewis b. on 27 Sep. 1875; d. on 5 May 1958, 82 years old.

Issue of Hattie Elizabeth Stroud and Charles Edgar Lewis:

290   i. son 8Rufus Cecil Lewis b. on 3 Oct. 1897.
291   ii. son Charles Everett Lewis b. in 1900.
      iii. son Raymond Lewis b. in 1903; m. (1) _____ Goldie; m. (2) _____ Leona; m. (3) _____ Jule.
292   iv. son Frank Edward Lewis b. on 22 March 1905.
293   v. dau. Verda Olive Lewis b. on 20 Nov. 1907.

171. 7Pertman Waymack Stroud, son of 6Ner Stroud [85] and Mary Francis Merry. Born on 10 Oct. 1877 in Effingham, Illinois. Died on 1 Nov. 1945 in Effingham, 68 years old. Buried in Effingham, Illinois, Mt. Zion Cemetery.

Married first Alice Ann Mahaney, dau. of Andrew Jackson Mahaney and Jane Fields, on 28 Aug. 1901 in Effingham when 23 years old (Alice Ann was 21 years old). Alice Ann Mahaney b. on 13 Nov. 1879; d. on 18 May 1908 in Effingham, 28 years old; bur. in Effingham.

Issue of Pertman Waymack Stroud and Alice Ann Mahaney:

294   i. dau. 8Hazel Viola Stroud b. on 21 Aug. 1902 in Effingham, Illinois, Lucas Township.
295   ii. dau. Helen Fern Stroud b. on 23 March 1904 in Effingham.

Married second Zeba Alosia Reed Etzell after 1909 when at least 32 years old (Zeba Alosia Reed was at least 30 years old). Zeba Alosia Reed Etzell b. on 31 Aug. 1879; d. in April 1957 in Effingham, 77 years old; bur. in Effingham.

Issue of Pertman Waymack Stroud and Zeba Alosia Reed Etzell:

      iii. dau. 8Mary Jane Stroud b. on 23 Dec. 1910 in Effingham; d. on 14 Feb. 1990 in Illinois, 79 years old; m. George Schopmeyer (31 Aug. 1890–Feb. 1969 in Illinois) on 7 Feb. 1959 when 48 years old (George was 68 years old).

Notes on Alice Ann Mahaney:

Occupation
Note: Schoolteacher - Taught 2nd grade at Effingham, IL . Certified to teach Aug 3, 1901

Tuberculosis

172. 7William Ura Stroud, son of 6Ner Stroud [85] and Mary Francis Merry. Born on 24 April 1880 in Winterrowd, Effingham, Illinois. Died in Nov. 1982 in Illinois, 102 years old. Buried in Wheeler, Jasper, Illinois.

Married first Theodosia M. Birkheimer. Theodosia M. Birkheimer b. on 19 May 1883; d. on 12 Sep. 1962, 79 years old.

Issue of William Ura Stroud and Theodosia M. Birkheimer:

296   i. son 8John Draper Stroud b. on 30 Sep. 1917.

Married second Lilly May Nichols in 1900 when 19 or 20 years old (Lilly May was 18 or 19 years old). Lilly May Nichols b. on 21 Feb. 1881; d. on 19 Nov. 1940, 59 years old.

Issue of William Ura Stroud and Lilly May Nichols:

      ii. son 8Dell Stroud b. about 1903.
      iii. dau. Cleo Stroud b. on 1 May 1906.

173. 7James Ner Stroud, son of 6Ner Stroud [85] and Mary Francis Merry. Born on 4 Oct. 1883 in Winterrowd, Effingham, Illinois. Died on 28 Nov. 1945 in Effingham, Effingham, Illinois, 62 years old. Buried in Jasper, Illinois, Wheeler Cemetery.

Married Bessie Bell Blunk on 28 Aug. 1904 when 20 years old (Bessie Bell was 17 years old). Bessie Bell Blunk b. on 25 Oct. 1886 in Effingham; d. on 24 Dec. 1964 in Decatur, Macon, Illinois, 78 years old.

Issue of James Ner Stroud and Bessie Bell Blunk:

297   i. dau. 8Susie Mary Stroud b. on 5 Nov. 1906 in Effingham.
298   ii. son Jesse Thomas Stroud b. on 2 April 1911 in Effingham.
299   iii. son James Earl Stroud b. on 8 Aug. 1912.
      iv. son Harvey Howard Stroud b. on 15 Oct. 1914; d. on 11 July 1939, 24 years old.
300   v. son Everett Henry Stroud b. on 14 April 1916.
301   vi. dau. Dora Mae Stroud b. on 31 May 1918.
302   vii. dau. Evea Deloris Stroud b. on 31 March 1920.
303   viii. son Edison Dale Stroud b. on 4 Sep. 1922 in Effingham.
304   ix. dau. Helen Lucille Stroud b. on 9 April 1927 in Jasper, Illinois.
305   x. dau. Anabelle Stroud b. on 1 March 1930 in Jasper.

Notes on James Ner Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3711@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Jasper, Illinois, Wheeler Cemetery, Wheeler [89097]


Issue of 6Samuel Josephus Stroud [86] (5Thomas Stroud Jr. [26], 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Johanna Katherine Eilers

174. 7Eliza Helen Stroud, dau. of 6Samuel Josephus Stroud [86] and Johanna Katherine Eilers. Born on 3 Dec. 1873 in Effingham, Effingham, Illinois.

Married Doctor James Elias Beard MD on 1 Dec. 1895 when 21 years old (Doctor James Elias MD was about 26 years old). Doctor James Elias Beard MD b. about 1869; d. on 8 June 1904 in Altamont, Effingham, Illinois, USA, about 35 years old.

Issue of Eliza Helen Stroud and Doctor James Elias Beard MD:

      i. dau. 8Ethel Lucretia Beard d. on 2 Aug. 1903.
306   ii. son John Beard b. in Sep. between 100 and 4099.
      iii. dau. Clara Beard .
307   iv. son Russell Beard .
308   v. son Samuel Beard b. on 13 Jan. 1900.
309   vi. son James C. Beard b. in 1905.

175. 7Bertha Mae Stroud, dau. of 6Samuel Josephus Stroud [86] and Johanna Katherine Eilers. Born on 31 Dec. 1883 in Mount Zion, Macon, Illinois. Died on 7 April 1933 in Cleveland, Cuyahoga, Ohio, USA, 49 years old. Buried in Effingham, Illinois, Mt. Zion Cemetery.

Married B. Woody.

Issue of Bertha Mae Stroud and B. Woody:

310   i. son 8Jean Able Hamilton b. on 15 Jan. 1906.

Notes on Bertha Mae Stroud:

Bertha taught school in Illinois and Louisville, KY. While in Louisville, she entered nursing training and later became a nurse in Cleveland, Ohio. She was gifted with a beautiful voice and was a talented pianist.

176. 7Ernest Ray Stroud, son of 6Samuel Josephus Stroud [86] and Johanna Katherine Eilers. Born on 12 Dec. 1889 in Effingham, Effingham, Illinois. Died on 11 March 1962 in Altamont, Effingham, Illinois, USA, 72 years old. Buried in Effingham, Illinois, Union Cemetery.

Married Mabel Overland. Mabel Overland b. in 1892; d. in 1951 in Altamont, 58 or 59 years old; bur. in Effingham.

Issue of Ernest Ray Stroud and Mabel Overland:

311   i. dau. 8Margit Stroud b. on 17 Jan. 1929.
312   ii. dau. Ruth Stroud b. on 7 Dec. 1930.

Notes on Ernest Ray Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3721@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Effingham, Illinois, Union Cemetery, Altamont [89271]

Event: - 2nd Lt. IL Field Artillery, US Army National Guard
Type: Military Service
Place: War (1917-1918) (World War I)
See source 1 for this person
Extracted text: Ernest Stroud
Media format: jpg
Media file: wwi Service Ribbon.jpg
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [89286]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [89287]

Sources for Ernest Ray Stroud:

Source 1
Title: War (1917-1918) (WW I) Service Records
ABBR: War (1917/4/6-1918/11/11) (WW I) Service
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Mabel Overland:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3726@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Effingham, Illinois, Union Cemetery, Altamont [89366]


Issue of 6Ephriam Joy Stroud [87] (5Thomas Stroud Jr. [26], 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Mary E. Wathens

177. 7Herschel Starr Stroud, son of 6Ephriam Joy Stroud [87] and Mary E. Wathens. Born on 28 Feb. 1879. Died on 18 Dec. 1942, 63 years old.

Married first Gladys Thelma Robinson.

Issue of Herschel Starr Stroud and Gladys Thelma Robinson:

      i. dau. 8Deloris Ruth Stroud m. Bill Wilson.
313   ii. son Herschel Steven Stroud b. on 8 June 1923.

Married second Minnie Croner.

Notes on Herschel Starr Stroud:

Death
Cause: Died of wounds during WW II.


Issue of 6Richard Nalls Stroud [88] (5Thomas Stroud Jr. [26], 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Sarah Jane Duckworth

178. 7Daisia J. Stroud, dau. of 6Richard Nalls Stroud [88] and Sarah Jane Duckworth. Born on 24 Sep. 1877.

Married Walter Preston Lown, son of Erving G. J. Lown and Nancy Erwin, on 16 April 1896 in Effingham, Effingham, Illinois when 18 years old (Walter Preston was 33 years old). Walter Preston Lown b. in March 1863.

Issue of Daisia J. Stroud and Walter Preston Lown:

      i. son 8Richard Glen Lown .
314   ii. dau. Thelma Lown .
315   iii. dau. Leafie Z. Lown b. on 9 May 1897.
      iv. son Harold Lown b. on 29 March 1904; d. on 12 March 1990 in Mendota, La Salle, Illinois, 85 years old; m. Prudence _____ (17 April 1907–Feb. 1993 in Mendota).
316   v. dau. Bernice Evelyn Lown b. on 24 June 1910.

179. 7Vandana Stroud, dau. of 6Richard Nalls Stroud [88] and Sarah Jane Duckworth. Born on 20 July 1879. Died on 8 May 1967 in Saint Louis, Saint Louis, Missouri, 87 years old.

Married Thomas Zandrew Poynter, son of James Thomas Poynter and Mary Emily McCULLOUGH, on 2 Oct. 1898 in Effingham, Illinois when 19 years old (Thomas Zandrew was 20 years old). Thomas Zandrew Poynter b. on 6 March 1878 in Effingham, Illinois, Lucas Township; d. on 27 Feb. 1941 in Effingham, Effingham, Illinois, 62 years old.

Issue of Vandana Stroud and Thomas Zandrew Poynter:

317   i. dau. 8Silvia Leila Poynter b. on 18 Aug. 1899.
318   ii. dau. Charlotte Poynter b. on 1 July 1901.
      iii. son Lovell Zandrew Poynter b. on 19 Oct. 1903; d. in 1942, 38 or 39 years old.
      iv. son Nolle Kenneth Poynter b. on 27 Aug. 1905; d. on 23 June 1993 in Missouri, 87 years old.

Notes on Thomas Zandrew Poynter:

Notes for the family of Thomas Zandrew Poynter and Vandana Stroud:

MarriageNote: Another source lists date of marriage as 30 Oct 1898.

180. 7Zolinda Helena Stroud, dau. of 6Richard Nalls Stroud [88] and Sarah Jane Duckworth. Born on 31 Oct. 1880. Died on 21 May 1963 in Dietrich, Effingham, Illinois, 82 years old. Buried in Effingham, Illinois, Dietrich Cemetery.

Married Ora Claudius Poe, son of Benjamin Franklin Poe and Delana Jane Redden, on 24 Dec. 1899 when 19 years old (Ora Claudius was 21 years old). Ora Claudius Poe b. on 3 Oct. 1878 in Effingham, Illinois, Lucas Township; d. in Feb. 1963 in Illinois, 84 years old; bur. in Effingham.

Issue of Zolinda Helena Stroud and Ora Claudius Poe:

319   i. dau. 8Jane Irene Poe b. on 12 Sep. 1900 in Effingham, Illinois, Union Township.
320   ii. son Rufus Asa Poe b. in 1902 in Effingham.
321   iii. son Reuben Clyde Poe b. on 17 Jan. 1904 in Effingham.
322   iv. dau. Nellie Agnes Poe b. on 13 July 1905 in Effingham.
      v. dau. Infant Poe b. on 13 July 1905 in Effingham; d. on 13 July 1905 in Effingham, newborn.
323   vi. son Aubrey Virgil Poe b. on 21 May 1907 in Effingham.
324   vii. dau. Josie Violet Poe b. on 7 Jan. 1909 in Effingham.
      viii. son Donald Edgar Poe b. on 13 Aug. 1911 in Effingham; m. (1) Ruby Pearl Hawn; m. (2) Bernadine Ruth Ruby (29 June 1912–2 June 1993 in Effingham, Effingham, Illinois) in Madeira Beach, Pinellas, Florida.
325   ix. dau. Lavera Margarete Poe b. on 12 April 1918 in Effingham.
326   x. son Ora Claudius Poe b. on 5 May 1923 in Effingham.

Notes on Zolinda Helena Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3732@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Effingham, Illinois, Dietrich Cemetery, Dietrich [89450]

Notes on Ora Claudius Poe:

Death
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): 332-28-0934
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [89517]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [89518]

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3736@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Effingham, Illinois, Dietrich Cemetery, Dietrich [89520]

Sources for Ora Claudius Poe:

Source 1
Title: Social Security Administration
Extracted Text:
Most of the names listed in the Social Security Death Index date from the 1960s. Though the Social Security Act was created in 1935, a computer system for reporting death benefit claims did not exist until 1962.
Keep in mind that the Social Security Death Index does not list every person who received Social Security Benefits. This index only lists deaths that were actually reported to the Social Security Administration.
Once you’ve found the name of a relative, you can request a copy of the full Social Security report from the Social Security Administration. You can also use the information in this index to obtain birth, death, and employment records.
ABBR: Social Security Administration
_PAREN: Y

181. 7Rev. Austin Edgar Stroud, son of 6Richard Nalls Stroud [88] and Sarah Jane Duckworth. Born on 11 May 1887 in Effingham, Illinois, Lucas Township. Died on 1 May 1933, 45 years old.

Married Effie Mae Gephart, dau. of Thomas Benton Gephart and Lora Etta Poe, on 21 June 1909 when 22 years old (Effie Mae was 19 years old). Effie Mae Gephart b. on 12 Feb. 1890 in Effingham; d. on 25 Jan. 1959, 68 years old.

Issue of Rev. Austin Edgar Stroud and Effie Mae Gephart:

327   i. son 8Rupert Loran Stroud b. on 20 July 1910.
328   ii. dau. Naidene Stroud b. on 4 Jan. 1913.
      iii. son 1st Lt. Adrian Pershing Stroud US Army Air Force b. on 11 Dec. 1918; d. on 15 Dec. 1945 in China-Burma-India Theater - Wor, 27 years old; bur. in (Philippines), Manila, Manila American Cemetery, Fort Bonifacio; m. Lois Schubert.
329   iv. dau. Eleanor Lita Stroud b. on 1 Feb. 1923.
      v. son Gene Stanley Stroud b. on 7 Dec. 1927.

182. 7Josephine Elizabeth Stroud, dau. of 6Richard Nalls Stroud [88] and Sarah Jane Duckworth. Born on 21 Oct. 1891. Died on 20 July 1950, 58 years old.

Married Henry Bernard Gossman, son of Bernhard Gossman and Emma Adeline Agrue, on 16 March 1909 in Effingham, Illinois, Union Township when 17 years old (Henry Bernard was 29 years old). Henry Bernard Gossman b. on 20 Feb. 1880 in Effingham, Illinois, Lucas Township; d. about 1951, about 71 years old.

Issue of Josephine Elizabeth Stroud and Henry Bernard Gossman:

330   i. son 8Therman Gossman b. on 31 Dec. 1910.


Issue of Thomas Herron and 6Irena Helena Stroud [89] (5Thomas Stroud Jr. [26], 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1])

183. 7Mabel Herron, dau. of Thomas Herron and 6Irena Helena Stroud [89]. Born in May 1890.

Married Freeman Wools. Freeman Wools b. on 31 March 1886; d. in Aug. 1968 in Indianapolis, Marion, Indiana, 82 years old.

Issue of Mabel Herron and Freeman Wools:

      i. son 8Thomas Wools b. on 10 Jan. 1909; d. in Feb. 1980 in Worthington, Greene, Indiana, 71 years old.
      ii. son Freeman Wools b. about 1913.

Notes on Freeman Wools:

46218

308-12-6360


Issue of 6William Riley Luther [91] (5Delaney Stroud [27], 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Allie Melinda Haltom

184. 7William Thomas Luther, son of 6William Riley Luther [91] and Allie Melinda Haltom. Born on 4 Sep. 1871 in Clay, Indiana. Died on 21 April 1952 in Brazil, Clay, Indiana, USA, 80 years old.

Married Nora Chaney on 27 Nov. 1889 when 18 years old (Nora was 16 years old). Nora Chaney b. on 5 Nov. 1873 in Brazil; d. on 23 Aug. 1944 in Brazil, 70 years old.

Issue of William Thomas Luther and Nora Chaney:

      i. son 8_____ Luther b. on 9 April 1892 in Clay.
      ii. dau. _____ Luther b. on 8 Jan. 1902 in Clay.
      iii. son _____ Luther b. on 27 Aug. 1896 in Clay.

Notes on William Thomas Luther:

Birth
See source 1 for this person

Notes for the family of William Thomas Luther and Nora Chaney:

See source 1 for this family

Sources for William Thomas Luther:

Source 1
Author: Janice Hagan
Title: Hand written Family Listings and “Luther News” published 1986-1989
Publication: Athens, Georgia, about 1980.
ABBR: Correspondence--Janice Hagan
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of William Thomas Luther and Nora Chaney:

Source 1
Author: Clay County, Indiana
Title: State of Indiana, County of Clay, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Clay, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of George Brock and 6Ally Louiza Maria Luther [92] (5Delaney Stroud [27], 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1])

185. 7Mary A. Brock, dau. of George Brock and 6Ally Louiza Maria Luther [92]. Born in 1858 in Clay, Indiana. Died in 1888 in Indiana, 29 or 30 years old.

Married Preston Sills on 17 May 1877 in Sullivan when 18 or 19 years old (Preston was 35 years old). Preston Sills b. on 17 Aug. 1841 in Sullivan; d. on 30 Nov. 1916 in Sullivan, 75 years old.

Issue of Mary A. Brock and Preston Sills:

      i. son 8John Sills b. in 1870 in Indiana.
      ii. dau. Elizabeth Sills b. in 1871 in Indiana.
      iii. son David Sills b. in 1873 in Indiana.
      iv. dau. Caroline Sills b. in 1876 in Indiana.

Notes on Mary A. Brock:

Birth
See source 1 for this person

Death
See source 1 for this person

Sources for Mary A. Brock:

Source 1
Author: Janice Hagan
Title: Hand written Family Listings and “Luther News” published 1986-1989
Publication: Athens, Georgia, about 1980.
ABBR: Correspondence--Janice Hagan
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Preston Sills:

Birth
See source 1 for this person

Death
See source 1 for this person

Census
Date: 1880
Place: , Sullivan, Indiana, Jackson Township
See source 2 for this person
Page(s): NA Film Number T9-0312, Page Number 418A
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Preston SILLS Self M Male W 39 IN Shoe Maker KY KY Mary SILLS Wife M Female W 20 IN Keeping House IN IN John SILLS Son S Male W 10 IN IN IN Elizabeth SILLS Dau S Female W 9 IN IN IN David SILLS Son S Male W 7 IN IN IN Caroline SILLS Dau S Female W 4 IN IN IN
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [891677]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [891678]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _VERI YES [891679]

Sources for Preston Sills:

Source 1
Author: Janice Hagan
Title: Hand written Family Listings and “Luther News” published 1986-1989
Publication: Athens, Georgia, about 1980.
ABBR: Correspondence--Janice Hagan
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Source 2
Title: 1880 US Census
Extracted Text:
The 1880 U.S. Census introduced several new questions dealing with mental health, schooling, and family relationships.
Many of these questions, specifically those detailing mental and physical health, can only be found within the original census document.
This data can offer personal detail lacking in earlier census surveys, and covers a generation that the 1930 U.S. Census does not cover.
The family relationships category can provide information about extended family. If a married daughter has been counted as part of her father’s household, for example her married surname will likely appear in the census.
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1880 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

186. 7Mahala Alice Brock, dau. of George Brock and 6Ally Louiza Maria Luther [92]. Born on 17 March 1873 in Clay, Indiana. Died on 1 July 1940 in Greene, 67 years old. Buried in Greene, Indiana, Lebanon Cemetery.

Married Sampson Weatherman on 28 March 1889 in Brazil, Clay, Indiana, USA when 16 years old (Sampson was 31 years old). Sampson Weatherman b. on 2 March 1858; d. in Jan. 1917 in Clay, 58 years old; bur. in Clay, Indiana, Sanders Cemetery.

Issue of Mahala Alice Brock and Sampson Weatherman:

      i. dau. 8Lola Mabel Weatherman b. on 3 June 1890 in Clay; d. on 7 Dec. 1892 in Clay, two years old.
      ii. dau. Myrtle Goldie Weatherman b. on 20 June 1893 in Clay; d. on 15 April 1980, 86 years old.
      iii. son Robert Ray Weatherman b. on 6 May 1896 in Clay; d. in April 1977 in Vigo, 80 years old.
      iv. son Albert Weatherman b. on 23 June 1899 in Indiana; d. in 1981 in South Bend, St. Joseph, Indiana, 81 or 82 years old.
      v. dau. Beatrice Glennsora Weatherman b. on 25 April 1903 in Indiana; d. on 3 March 1988 in Greene, 84 years old; bur. in Greene.
      vi. dau. Reba Lucille Weatherman b. on 28 Feb. 1907 in Indiana; d. on 10 June 1998 in Mishawaka, St. Joseph, Indiana, 91 years old.
      vii. dau. Eva Nell Weatherman b. on 4 Nov. 1910 in Indiana.

Notes on Mahala Alice Brock:

Birth
See source 1 for this person

Death
See source 1 for this person

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I58146@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Greene, Indiana, Lebanon Cemetery, Midland [891875]

Sources for Mahala Alice Brock:

Source 1
Author: Hochstetler, T. Max
Title: Correspondence by email
Publication: Address: Maxhochstetler@prodigy.net (July 2000)
ABBR: Correspondence--Max Hochstetler
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Sampson Weatherman:

Birth
Note: This birthdate is estimated.

Death
See source 1 for this person

Notes for the family of Sampson Weatherman and Mahala Alice Brock:

See source 1 for this family

Sources for Sampson Weatherman:

Source 1
Author: Hochstetler, T. Max
Title: Correspondence by email
Publication: Address: Maxhochstetler@prodigy.net (July 2000)
ABBR: Correspondence--Max Hochstetler
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of Sampson Weatherman and Mahala Alice Brock:

Source 1
Author: Hochstetler, T. Max
Title: Correspondence by email
Publication: Address: Maxhochstetler@prodigy.net (July 2000)
ABBR: Correspondence--Max Hochstetler
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y


Issue of 6Elisha Stroud [97] (5Rev. Annual Stroud MG [29], 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Ruth Adeline Rawlings

187. 7Sarah Emma Stroud, dau. of 6Elisha Stroud [97] and Ruth Adeline Rawlings. Born on 21 Feb. 1876 in Morehead, Neosho, Kansas. Died on 24 March 1941 in Vancouver, Clark, Washington, 65 years old. Buried in Clark, Washington, Park Hill Cemetery.

Married John William Coffield, son of Alfred Heywood Coffield and Esther Brittle Wagle, on 22 Sep. 1892 in Morehead when 16 years old (John William was 23 years old). John William Coffield b. on 22 July 1869 in Beardstown, Cass, Illinois, USA; d. on 14 Feb. 1949 in Vancouver, 79 years old; bur. in Clark.

Issue of Sarah Emma Stroud and John William Coffield:

      i. dau. 8Ruth Ione Coffield b. on 18 Sep. 1893 in Thayer, Neosho, Kansas; d. on 30 Dec. 1931 in Canby, Clackamas, Oregon, USA, 38 years old; bur. in Multnomah, Oregon, Riverside Cemetery; m. William Reto Abel on 17 June 1915 in Vancouver when 21 years old.
      ii. dau. Nellie May Coffield b. on 6 Sep. 1895 in Thayer; d. on 6 Sep. 1895 in Thayer, newborn.
331   iii. dau. Esther Viola Coffield b. on 13 Sep. 1896 in Thayer.
332   iv. dau. Naomi Harriet Coffield b. on 30 Dec. 1898 in Thayer.
      v. son Edward Elisha Coffield b. on 14 April 1901 in Thayer; d. on 27 Sep. 1971 in Vancouver, 70 years old; m. _____ Fletcher.
      vi. son Alfred Heywood Coffield b. on 17 April 1903 in Thayer; d. in 1986 in Reedsport, Douglas, Oregon, 82 or 83 years old; m. (1) _____ Greene; m. (2) _____ Quarnbergm.
      vii. son _____ Coffield m. _____ Anderson.

Notes on Sarah Emma Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3346@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Clark, Washington, Park Hill Cemetery, Vancouver [80327]

Notes on John William Coffield:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I48343@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Clark, Washington, Park Hill Cemetery, Vancouver [765397]

John was a twin, his cousins were triplet boys, who at about 5 years won a prize at the county fair with one dressed a girl with ribbons.


Issue of 6John Riley Stroud [99] (5Rev. Annual Stroud MG [29], 4Thomas Stroud Sr. [11], 3Abraham Strode American Patriot [6], 2Thomas Stroud Strode [3], 1George Strode [1]) and Rachel P. Purkhiser

188. 7Nora M. Stroud, dau. of 6John Riley Stroud [99] and Rachel P. Purkhiser. Born in Dec. 1870 in Indiana. Died after 1920, at least 50 years old.

Married Elisha M. Jones about 1890 in Crawford when about 20 years old (Elisha M. was about 26 years old). Elisha M. Jones b. in Dec. 1864 in Indiana; d. after 1920, at least 56 years old.

Issue of Nora M. Stroud and Elisha M. Jones:

333   i. dau. 8Florence M. Jones b. on 4 Jan. 1892/3 in Marengo, Crawford, Indiana, USA.
334   ii. dau. Ola E. Jones b. on 27 Nov. 1895 in Orange.
335   iii. dau. Rehue Jones b. on 26 May 1899 in Crawford.

Notes on Nora M. Stroud:

A female child born no first name given: Jones, Father Elisha M Mother Nora Stroud Sex F DOB 27 Nov 1895 H- 3 8 Orange

189. 7George Sanford Stroud, son of 6John Riley Stroud [99] and Rachel P. Purkhiser. Born on 1 Sep. 1878 in Marengo, Crawford, Indiana, USA.

Married Fannie M. Jones on 9 Feb. 1900 in Orange, Indiana when 21 years old (Fannie M. was 16 or 17 years old). Fannie M. Jones b. in 1883 in Indiana.

Issue of George Sanford Stroud and Fannie M. Jones:

      i. dau. 8Helen Stroud b. about 1904 in Indiana.
      ii. son Densil Stroud b. about 1909 in Indiana.
336   iii. dau. Beulah R. Stroud b. on 29 Sep. 1914 in Indiana.

Notes on George Sanford Stroud:

Census
Date: 1910
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty Township
Note: Page 38a

Notes for the family of George Sanford Stroud and Fannie M. Jones:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book C-9, page 421Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence

Sources for the family of George Sanford Stroud and Fannie M. Jones:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Orange, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

190. 7James G. Stroud, son of 6John Riley Stroud [99] and Rachel P. Purkhiser. Born on 18 May 1880 in Crawford, Indiana. Died on 22 Jan. 1912 in Indiana, 31 years old. Buried in Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs.

Married Edith Miller, dau. of Thomas Halleck Miller (son of Logan Miller and Rebecca Alspaugh) and Catherine B. Riddle (dau. of Perry Riddle and Patience Tadlock), on 4 Nov. 1903 in Crawford when 23 years old (Edith was 19 years old). Edith Miller b. on 2 Oct. 1884 in Crawford; d. on 20 Dec. 1976 in Fittstown, Pontotoc, Oklahoma, 92 years old.

Issue of James G. Stroud and Edith Miller:

      i. son 8James Marvin Stroud b. on 16 Sep. 1905 in Crawford; d. on 21 Feb. 1985 in Saint Louis, Saint Louis, Missouri, 79 years old; m. Marie F. Mosely about 1927 when about 22 years old.

Notes on James G. Stroud:

GEDCOM No more than four place names can be entered: 0 @I3747@ INDI ◊ 1 BURI ◊ 2 PLAC , Crawford, Indiana, Marengo (Big Springs, Old Town) Cemetery, Marengo [89702]

Census
Date: 1910
Place: , Crawford, Indiana, Liberty Township
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): Page 2 line 17
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Extracted text: Stroud, James G. age 29, m 6 yrs , Edith W., age 25, m 6 yrs, 1 born 1 living , Marviin M., age 4

Schoolteacher

Notes for the family of James G. Stroud and Edith Miller:

See source 1 for this familyPage(s): Book G page 532Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidenceNote: Married by J. A. Breeden

Sources for James G. Stroud:

Source 1
Title: 1910 US Census
Extracted Text:
This database is an index to the head of households enumerated in the 1910 United States Federal Census, the Thirteenth Census of the United States. In addition, actual images of the 1910 Federal Census, copied from the National Archives and Records Administration microfilm, T624, 1784 rolls may be browsed by selecting a state, county, township, and enumeration district.
Enumerators of the 1910 census were instructed to record the names of every person in the household. Enumerators were asked to include the following categories in the census: name; relationship to head of family; age at last birthday; sex; color or race; whether single, married, widowed, or divorced; number of years of present marriage; number of children born; number of children now living; birthplace; mother tongue; birthplace of father and mother; mother tongue of father and mother; year of immigration to the U.S.; whether naturalized or alien; whether able to speak English, or if not, give language spoken; trade or profession; industry; whether employer, employee, or working on own account; if an employee, whether out of work on April 15, 1910; if an employee, number of weeks out of work during year 1909, whether able to read; whether able to write; attended school any time since September 1, 1909; home owned or rented; home owned free or mortgaged; farm or house; number of farm schedule; whether a survivor of the Union or Confederate Army or Navy; whether blind; whether deaf and dumb. The categories allowed Congress to determine persons residing in the United States for collection of taxes and the appropriation of seats in the House of Representatives
MEDI: Census/Tax
ABBR: 1910 US Census
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Sources for the family of James G. Stroud and Edith Miller:

Source 1
Title: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
ABBR: State of Indiana, County of Crawford, Marriage Records
_ITALIC: Y
_PAREN: Y

Notes on Edith Miller:

Death
See source 1 for this person
Page(s): 303-18-7405
Assessment: Direct and primary evidence used, or by dominance of the evidence
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG3 YES [89766]
Unrecognized GEDCOM tag: 3 _TAG4 YES [89767]

Census
Date: 01 JAN 1920
Place: , Crawford, I